SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING & PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Undergraduate Degree Programs

School of Engineering and Physical Sciences (SEPS) is the second largest school in NSU, comprising four departments: the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE); Civil and Environmental Engineering Department (CEED); Architecture; and the Department of Mathematics and Physics (DMP). The structure of the curriculum of the departments under the school comprises four major blocks: the university-wide general education courses; school of engineering core requirements for basic sciences, mathematics and common engineering courses; major core courses of each department; and elective courses with concentration. Along with these, a unique feature of SEPS curriculum is inclusion of a Capstone Design course at final year level. In fact, very recently a major review of the SEPS curriculum was made following the standard practices adopted in the USA, specifically the professional bodies, for example, ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, USA) criteria. This updated curriculum also qualifies for the local requirement of the Institution of Engineers, Bangladesh (IEB) and the Institute of Architects, Bangladesh (IAB). 

Department of Architecture

Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.)

Program Objective

The objective of the Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.) degree is to prepare master builders of the future based on three guiding principles: critical thinking developed through the awareness and knowledge of the arts and the sciences; creative approach by believing in the human capacity for innovation as a tool for the betterment of self and the society; and ethical responsibility to serve others.

Its aim is to provide the students with education and experiences that are broadly based on the fundamentals of the profession and are delivered through hands-on learning.

 

The Curriculum

The curriculum in architecture requires fifteen semesters of study for the first professional degree, the Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.). The breakdown of the total 160 credits is given below:

Category

                Credits

 

 

University General Education Courses

   34 Credits

 

Languages

12 Credits

 

 

Humanities

9 Credits

 

 

Social Sciences

9 Credits

 

 

Computer & Math Skills (cross listed in Architecture Foundation Courses)

(9 Credits)

 

 

Sciences with Lab

4 Credits

 

 

Architecture Foundation Courses

 

56 Credits

Major Requirements

60 Credits

 

 

 

 

Major Elective Courses

 

9 Credits

 

Free Electives

4 Credits

 

 

Total

160 Credits

Bachelor of Architecture (B. ARCH.)                     (160 Credits)

 

GENERAL EDUCATION                                                                          (34 Credits)

  • Languages                                                                                                 (12 Credits)

 

English Composition                                                                                

      • ENG 102 Introduction to Composition                                  3* non degree/waiver
      • ENG 103 Intermediate Composition                                      3

English Speech/ Professional Communication                                               

      • ENG 111 Public Speaking                                                      3                                             
      • ENG 115 Literature                                                                3
  • Humanities                                                                                  (9 Credits)

 

Philosophy/Ethics (any one)                                                         3

      • PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy
      • PHI 104 Introduction to Ethics                                              3

History (World/Indo-Bangladesh/Islamic)                                                          

      • HIS 101 Bangladesh Culture and Heritage                            3
      • HIS 102 Introduction to World Civilization                          3
  • Social Sciences                                                                            (9 Credits)

 

Political Science/ Government (any one)                                      3

      • POL 101 Introduction to Political Science
      • POL 104 Introduction to Governance

Economics (Micro/ Macro Principles) (any one)                           3

      • ECO 101 Introduction to Microeconomics
      • ECO 104 Introduction to Macroeconomics

Sociology/ Geography/ Anthropology (any one)                          3

      • ENV 203/ GEO 205 Introduction to Bangladesh Geography
      • ANT 101 Introduction to Anthropology
      • SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
  • Computer and Math Skills                                                                     -

 

Computer Information Systems                                                              

      • MIS 105 Introduction to Computers (cross listed)                                        

Calculus I                                                                                     

      • MAT 116 Pre-Calculus (cross listed)                                                             
      • MAT 120 Calculus – I (cross listed)                                                              

Probability & Statistics                                                                            

      • STA 172 Introduction to Statistics (cross listed)
  • Sciences (with lab)                                                                       (4 Credits)

 

      • BIO 103 Biology I – Lab                                                                   4
      • CHE 101 General Chemistry – Lab (cross listed)                                                                 
      • PHY 107L Physics I – Lab (cross listed)           

ARCHITECTURE FOUNDATION COURSES                          (56 Credits)

      • MIS 105          Introduction to Computers                                        3
      • MAT 116 Pre-Calculus                                                                       3
      • MAT 120 Calculus - I                                                                         3
      • STA 172 Introduction to Statistics                                                     3
      • CHE 101 General Chemistry – Lab                                                    4         
      • PHY 107L Physics I – Lab                                                                 4         
      • ARC 241 Architectural History I                                                       3
      • ARC 342 Architectural History II                                                      3
      • ARC 261 Environmental Control Systems I                                      3
      • ARC 262 Environmental Control Systems II                                     3
      • ARC 263 Building Service Systems I                                                            3
      • ARC 264 Building Service Systems II                                               3
      • ARC 271 Construction Materials & Assemblies I                              3
      • ARC 272 Construction Materials & Assemblies II                            3
      • ARC 451 Engineering Economics & Practice                                    3
      • ARC 452 Professional Technical Writing                                           3
      • CEE 281 Structural Systems I                                                            3
      • CEE 282 Structural Systems II                                                          3

 

DESIGN & COMMUNICATION                                                              (60 Credits)

      • ARC 111 Architectural Design Studio I                                            6
      • ARC 112 Architectural Design Studio II                                           6
      • ARC 213 Architectural Design Studio III                                         6
      • ARC 214 Architectural Design Studio IV                                         6
      • ARC 315 Architectural Design Studio V                                           6
      • ARC 316 Architectural Design Studio VI                                         6
      • ARC 417 Architectural Design Studio VII                                        6
      • ARC 418 Architectural Design Studio VIII                                      6
      • ARC 510 Architectural Design Studio IX                                         6
      • ARC 519 Architectural Design Studio X                                           6
      • ARC 500 Professional Internship                                           non-credit

 

MAJOR ELECTIVES                                                                                (9 Credits)

 

Area I (any one)                                                                                        3

      • ARC 131 Sources in Architecture                                                     
      • ARC 132 Basic Architectural Theory                                                

Area II (any one)                                                                                       3

      • ARC 343 Contemporary Architecture
      • ARC 391 Urban Design & Planning

                                               
Area III (any one)                                                                                     3

      • ARC 321         Computer Graphics and Design Media                                 
      • ARC 392         Interior Design Studio

 

      • Special Topics: An elective course equivalent to 3 credit hours belong to any of the above three specializations may be offered depending on student demand, availability of specialized teacher including regular or visiting faculty member. In one semester one such course may be offered. 3 Credit Hours   

                       

FREE ELECTIVE                                                                                       (4 Credits)

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

UNIVERSITY GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES

Please see page 34 for General Education Requirements: The Courses

Architecture Foundation Courses:

 

ARC 241        Architectural History I
Comparative study of architecture from a historical perspective in the context of changing technologies and cultural formations, predominantly but not exclusively with reference to Western Civilization. Ideology, analysis, and criticism. Critical evolution of architecture from political, social and religious viewpoints with examples from ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece and Rome. Comparative study of European art and architecture from early Christian, Byzantine, Romanesque, Medieval, Gothic and Renaissance, Baroque to Modern. Art nouveau, Bauhaus, Modern masters. 3 Credits

 

ARC 261        Environmental Control Systems I
External and internal environments; considerations of macro climate, site climate, human comfort criteria and ranges; solar control, day-lighting, energy and other issues affecting design. Climatic zones, characteristics and influence of climatic conditions on the natural and built environments. Behaviour and performance of a building and its components as a climatic modifier to provide comfort and energy savings through architectural design. Architectural responses to different climatic conditions; building shape, orientation, materials, construction systems, details and design solutions. Passive thermal design and natural ventilation. 3 Credits

 

ARC 262        Environmental Control Systems II
Study of luminous and sonic environments and supporting building systems. Physical properties of light and illumination. Vision, effects of light on comfort and performance. Daylight prediction tools, supplementary and artificial lighting. Architectural acoustics, properties or sound, fundamentals of sound perception, generation and propagation. Behaviour of sound in enclosed space; room acoustics and noise control systems, acoustic design of rooms for speech, music and multi-purpose use. Internal acoustic and basic sound systems.  Prerequisite: PHY 107L. 3 Credits

ARC 263        Building Service Systems I
Sanitation and plumbing related to buildings. Water requirements, sources, supply and distribution. Building sewage and sewer systems. Waste disposal and recycling. Air-conditioning; cooling load calculation, design of ducts, air handling and distribution; equipment. Mechanical systems for vertical and horizontal transportation. Electrical systems, communication and security. Electrical wiring for various types of buildings. Illumination and electrical lighting. Prerequisite: ARC 262. 3 Credits

ARC 264        Building Service Systems II
Energy management; codes and regulatory standards and behaviour of buildings envelop. Energy efficiency and sustainability. Study of building subsystems inter-system relationships and synergistic integration; high performance building and greater overall value. Energy simulation and sustainability. Sustainable sites and water efficiency. Green building. Life safety and service systems. Design of occupant health and safety, indoor environmental quality, fire hazards and fire fighting methods. Related building codes and standards. Earthquake vulnerability and building form configuration. Prerequisite: ARC 263. 3 Credits

ARC 271        Construction Materials & Assemblies I
Various building materials, with emphases on the anatomy of buildings, including the function, physical makeup and the working principles of various building materials, their interrelationships and design implications. Local materials and construction system. Types of structures, construction methods and techniques. Foundation, floor, wall and roof systems. Classification of materials. Preparation, manufacture, properties, uses and application of industrialized and vernacular materials. Indoor and outdoor finish, cladding. Appropriateness of application and expression. 3 Credits

 

ARC 272        Construction Materials & Assemblies II
Building systems and introduction to the process of construction from design initiation to construction completion; comprehensive study of the building construction systems and methods, and their implications on sustainability and decision-making. Moisture and thermal protection, termite control, insulation, etc. Doors and windows. Physical and construction details of kitchen, bathroom, stair, elevators and escalators. Construction techniques of special forms: dome, vault, shell, space frame and metal structure. Prerequisite: ARC 271. 3 Credits

 

 

ARC 342        Architectural History II
Art and architecture of the Indian sub-continent. Ancient period including Indus Valley, Vedic, Buddhist and Hindu periods and medieval including pre-Mughal and Mughal to the beginning of the colonial area. Reference to provincial architecture with emphasis on Bengal. Social, cultural, political and economic development and their influence on the built form. Architectural elements and their context, materials and techniques. Comparative analysis. Critical evaluation of the transformation and reflection. 3 Credits

 

ARC 451        Engineering Economics & Practice
Building enterprise, and private and public macroeconomics. Construction cost estimates and cost control, time value of money and building life-cycle cost, measuring the worth of investments, depreciation and tax consideration of cash-flows. Potential and projected rate of return on investment. Professional ethics and practice; The regulatory system: planning and urban design controls, building code and approval process. Management principles and practice. Responsibilities and liabilities of building professionals, relationship with architects, local authorities and building legislation. Prerequisite: ECO 101 or ECO 104. 3 Credits

ARC 452        Professional Technical Writing
Technical documentation. Tender documents, rules, regulations and obligations. Selection of Contractor, and work award. Supervision of construction, bill and certificate of payment. Preparation of schedules. Specifying materials and methods of installation and precautions, building services, environmental protection. Meaning, scope, objectives, function and nature of management. Importance and scope of management in the construction sector. Grouping of activities, delegation and decentralization. Motivation, coordination, supervision. Steps of control. Construction management. Leadership issues. Prerequisites ENG 103. 3 Credits

                       
CEE 281         Structural Systems I
Statics: review of vector mathematics; moment and force resultants; static equilibrium in two dimensions; friction; centroids; center of gravity; distributed loadings; moments of inertia of areas; Introduction to the fundamental principles and methods of structural analysis (beams, trusses, frames), support conditions, axial force, shear force and bending moment diagrams of statically determinate systems, deflection of beams; stresses and strains in structural elements, constitutive laws, states of stress (axial, bending, shear,  and torsion); instability of columns. Prerequisite: PHY 107L. MAT 120. 3 Credits

 

CEE 282         Structural Systems II
Loads on structures, wind and earthquake loads, design philosophies; analysis of reinforced concrete beam section under service loading, design of reinforced concrete beams according to ultimate stress design methods; reinforced concrete floor and roof systems, Design of columns by ultimate stress design, foundations, rafts and pile caps; Study of steel, properties and composition; commonly used shapes and sizes; introduction to AISC methods (ASD and LRFD) for design of tension, compression members and beams. Prerequisite: ARC 281. 3 Credits

 

Major Requirements

ARC 111        Architectural Design Studio I
Two-dimensional exercises in various media. Basic composition with different elements of forms, points, lines and shapes. Study of order, balance, proportion, solid-void relationship, symmetry, flexibility, rhythm and harmony through composition; relevance to art and architecture, music, etc. Exposure to color media, composition and techniques. Exercise in color and texture. Mechanical and free hand architectural presentation drawings, including, multi view drawings, plan and elevations. 6 Credits. Studio          

ARC 112        Architectural Design Studio II
Fundamentals of three dimensional composition. Elements of forms and spaces and their different aspects. Layering and sequence of space, solids and voids, transparency and opacity. Multi-layer analysis of compositions of different media and finding three-dimensional expression through application of basic ordering principles. Study of basic design components such as order and balance, proportion, solid-void relationship, symmetry, movement, flexibility, harmony and shade and shadow. Mechanical and free hand architectural presentation drawings, including, section and isometric/axonometric drawings.  Prerequisite: ARC 111. 6 Credits. Studio

ARC 213        Architectural Design Studio III
Ergonomics and elementary architectural spaces. Development of awareness and perception of fundamentals of architecture: scale, proportion and space. Creative problem-solving in two- and three-dimensional exercises. Study of various materials. Simple assignments to comprehend architectural elements, man-space relationship, activity-space relationship and form-space relationship as essential design generators. Mechanical and free hand architectural presentation drawings, one and two point perspectives, rendering with shade and shadow.  Prerequisite: ARC 112. 6 Credits. Studio

ARC 214        Architectural Design Studio IV
Design process emphasizing on conceptualization and generation of forms, interplay between form and space, and experimentation with various types of spatial relationships. Ideation developed through analytical study. Investigating major design parameters- site, circulation pattern and function through small exercises. Design for a site situation and limited program, simple functional and technical requirements. Study of Architects’ work. Basic computer aided drawing and use of CAD software in architectural presentation in 2D and 3D. Prerequisite: ARC 213. 6 Credits. Studio

ARC 315        Architectural Design Studio V
Exploratory investigation and analysis of the fundamental design principles, technical concepts and applications, and the measures of quality in architecture. Explore the nature of problems with which architecture is concerned and develop design methods for the structuring of concepts and forms that respond to identified need. Critical study of form and spatial quality, and indoor-outdoor relationship. Technical construction drawing, symbols and terminology. Constructional and architectural details, shop drawings. Working drawing for project execution, architectural details of plan, elevation and section.  Prerequisite: ARC 214. 6 Credits. Studio

ARC 316        Architectural Design Studio VI
Review of design principles; experimentation with the vocabulary of architectural form, space and order; understanding function, structure and environment and their relationships. Phenomenology of elements of shelter; climatic, technological and environmental implications in designing space. Design exercises on complex briefs emphasizing innovative ideas that incorporate formal and functional expressions, environmental needs and structural solutions. Tall buildings, earthquake load and building form. Working drawing for project execution: finishing materials of interior and exterior; schedules of openings and finishing materials. Prerequisite: ARC 315. 6 Credits. Studio

ARC 417      Architectural Design Studio VII
Urban issues as a major design parameter to grow an awareness of site, location, climate, economy, technology, political and socio-cultural aspects and ecology. Study of nature and relationship of spaces with urban context, and realism imposed by functional, technical, economic and statutory requirements. Civic-social facilities at the community and urban scale, and collaboration among the several disciplines shaping the human habitat: urban design, landscape, sociology, and economics. Urban renewal, regeneration, redevelopment, and conservation project.  Prerequisite: ARC 316.  6 Credits. Studio

ARC 418        Architectural Design Studio VIII
Core professional studies with emphasis on group topical areas of study on broader context. Social, cultural, political and economic aspects as parameter for designing.  Study of defined localities with edges, in an urban or rural community context, and realism imposed by function, technology, and statute. Design studies of housing types and planned communities, at a wider scale, and their impact on the immediate environment, and collaboration among the several disciplines involved in planning the human settlement: urban planning, sociology, and economics.  Prerequisite: ARC 417. 6 Credits. Studio

ARC 510      Architectural Design Studio IX
Conduct advanced independent architectural research requiring the articulation of a conceptual and professional position. Design of building with different complex functions, emphasizing on holistic integration for optimum performance and constructability with best possible economy under realistic temporal, technical, legal, and budgetary limitations. All design phases from feasibility and formulation of programs to preparation of working and technical drawings and documents, to a synthetic size design, construction and systems. Partial construction documentation. Prerequisite: ARC 418. 6 Credits. Studio

ARC 519        Architectural Design Studio X
Conduct advanced independent architectural research requiring the articulation of a conceptual and professional position and realize them in a terminal capstone project or thesis addressing design issues on specific building types or complexes depending on the student’s particular interests, talents and capacities. Complete design solution based upon investigations and objective analysis of the physical and contextual aspects of the problem and related factors and transforming them into a tangible architectural solution of professionally acceptable quality, presented and defended in a public jury.  Prerequisite: ARC510. 6 Credits. Studio

ARC 500        Professional Internship
Non-credit but mandatory; 300 working hours of supervised and monitored training in an architectural consultant’s office over 12 weeks; usually during the fifth year of study and preferably not spread in more than one semester. Portfolio of work during the training along with mentors report. Training on the application of the architectural knowledge, linking theory with the practice; integration with other professions, society and the built environment. Prerequisite: 120 Credits and ARC 316. Non Credit.

Major Electives
Note: any one course from each pool is required.

ARC 131        Sources in Architecture
Introductory studies of creative arts like painting, sculpture, music, film, photography etc. Art as an expression of the material culture. People and art. Evolution of art through the ages. Criticism of art in particular context, methodology. Sculpture as a form of artistic and architectural expression. Techniques; basic shapes and free expressions in plastic material and mixed media.  Music and its form. Ordering principles of music. The Indian and the Western concepts; Raga versus western classical music. Film as a media to understand three-dimensional journey through spaces: orientation, lighting, setting, color, makeup. 3 Credits.

ARC 132        Basic Architectural Theory
Concepts of form generation. Analysis of design as a non-verbal language structured by grammar; sign and symbol, order, form and proportion, expression and communication. Aesthetic as knowledge, activity, methods and models. Aesthetic communication. Basic theories of architecture on point, line, plane, form, volume and space; source, generation and transformation of architectural elements, forms and spaces. Overview of theories and application of architectural proportion, scale and composition. Principles of spatial and formal organization. Analysis of the formal order of selected case studies. 3 Credits

ARC 321        Computer Graphics and Design Media
Importance of different instruments in architectural study and presentation. Use of computer software for digital presentation; animation and walk-through. Multi-media applications. 3D Architecture and solid modeling. Properties and uses of various media, materials and processes as tools for analysis, documentation and presentation of the designed environment. Basic skills and techniques relating to photography and printmaking. 3 Credits. Studio

ARC 333        Advanced Architectural Theory
Dialectic between a diachronic sequence of architectural theories and related works. Critical writings clarifying epistemological dimensions. Developing a critical awareness of architectural theories and the skill to apply theoretical knowledge in the comprehension, evaluation and criticism of architecture. Selected topics addressing the philosophy, theory, personality, and work of significant contemporary architects and urban designers. Examine the rise of post-modernism and afterwards; the development of the philosophy of significant contemporary architectural writers and architects in relation to their projects and executed work. Case studies. 3 Credits 

 

ARC 343        Contemporary Architecture
Selected topics addressing the philosophy, theory, personality, and work of significant contemporary architects and urban designers. Examines the rise of post-modernism and afterwards; the development of the philosophy of significant contemporary architectural writers and architects in relation to their projects and executed work. Case studies. 3 Credits

ARC 391        Urban Design & Planning
Urban design analysis, elements of design and development strategy. City planning according to artistic principles; urban morphology in terms of phases of development with emphasis on environmental, cultural and economic factors of growth. Responsive environment. Spatial and infrastructure elements of the city. Functional planning, comprehensive urban development process; system approach; advocacy and corporate planning. Incremental development, public-private collaboration, community incentives and control, project implementation strategy. Environmental Impact Assessment. 3 Credits

ARC 392        Interior Design Studio
Interior spaces; relationship between humans and interior spaces, its impact on function, forms and psychology. Basic principles of interior design methods, standards, planning and spatial conception, materials and technical considerations. Aspects of layout, furnishing and circulation in interior spaces. Materials in terms of textures, colors, illumination and acoustics. Lightweight construction systems, interior and exterior finishing materials. Theories of color, light and color, effects of color on people, use of color in interior in relation to function, materials, surface and color scheme integration. Graphics and symbols. Upholstery and their fixation. 3 Credits. Studio

ARC 491        Rural Studies
Theories and meaning of development; nature and scope of integrated rural development. Problems and issues in rural development: population, urbanization, migration, human resource. Development institutions; the process of planning, policies and strategies. Formulation of rural development projects, concepts, principles and techniques. Social, economic and physical characteristics of rural settlements. Traditional house form, vernacular architecture. Materials and construction system. 3 Credits

ARC 493        Landscape Design Studio
Landscape design considered as work of art, manifestation of cultural ideologies and act of humans in nature; space design and definition. Analysis of landscape elements, perceptual and technical aspects of landscape elements and exterior spaces, gardens, public open spaces, parks, and urban development. Design and practice. Basic identification of plants and landscape drawings. 3 Credits. Studio

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEED)

Bachelor of Science in Civil and Environmental Engineering (BS CEE)

Program Educational Objectives of BSCEE:

The general objective of the BSCEE degree program is to prepare graduates to become successful in their chosen career paths.  Specifically, the graduates of the program will be able to:

PEO-1: successfully apply fundamental mathematical, scientific, and engineering principles in formulating and solving engineering problems;
PEO-2: work competently in one or more core civil engineering discplines;
PEO-3: demonstrate social and ethical responsibility through personal and professional contributions to society; and
PEO-4: develop and promote new and improved skills and participate in the overall development of the civil engineering practice.

Summary of the BSCEE Curriculum:
The Bachelor of Science in Civil and Environmental Engineering (BSCEE) requires a minimum of 130 credits in about 4 years, i.e., in 12 semesters, each semester being 4-months long. The breakdown of the required total 130 semester credit hours is as follows:

Category

Credits

University-wide General Education Courses

34

School of Engineering and Physical Sciences (SEPS) Core

38

Civil and Environmental Engineering Core

43

Civil and Environmental Engineering Electives

09

Free Electives

03

Civil and Environmental Engineering Capstone Design Project

03

Co-op/ Internship

Non-Credit

Total Credit =

130 Credits

 

Weekly Contact Hours:
The weekly contact hours for different types of courses of the revised curriculum are as follows:

Course type

Credit Hour

Lecture Hours /Week

Lab or Design Lab Hours /Week

Lecture only

3 or non-credit

3

0

Lab only

0 or 1

0

3

Design Lab only

0 to 3

0

3

Lecture with embedded Lab or Design Lab

3 or 4

3

3

Capstone Design

1 to 2

0

3

Co-op/Internship

non-credit

Will be evaluated based on last two semesters’ work on co-op /internship

 

Details of the Proposed Curriculum:
The course details of the revised curriculum are presented in the following pages, followed by the course descriptions.

Bachelor of Science in Civil and Environmental Engineering (BSCEE)         (130 Credits)

University General Education Courses(34 Credits)

  • Languages                                                                                             (12 Credits)

ENG 102 Introduction to Composition                                                  3
ENG 103 Intermediate Composition                                                      3
CEE 401 / EEE 401 Professional Communication                                 3
ENG 115 Literature                                                                                3

  • Humanities                                                                                             (9 Credits)

PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy                                                       3
/ PHI 104 Introduction to Ethics                                                          
HIS 101 Bangladesh Culture and Heritage (3 credits)                           6
/ HIS 102 Introduction to World Civilizations (3 credits)                                             
/ HIS 203 Islamic History (3 credits) – Any two courses

  • Social Sciences                                                                                        (9 Credits)

POL 101 Introduction to Political Science / POL 104 Governance       3
ECO 101 Micro Economics / ECO 104 Macro Economics                    3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology                                                       3
/ ENV 203 Geography
/ GEO 205 Bangladesh Geography
/ ANT 101Anthropology        

  • Computer and Math Skills                                                                   -          

CSE 115 Programming Language I (With Lab)*                                    4
MAT 125 Linear Algebra*                                                                      3
STA 172 Introduction to Probability & Statistics*                                 3
MAT 116 Pre-calculus*                                                                           0

  • Sciences (with lab)                                                                                 (4 Credits)

BIO 103 Biology I                                                                                  4
/ ENV 107 Introduction to Environmental Science
/ PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology 
/ PBH 101 Introduction to Public Health                                           
CHE 101 Chemistry I*                                                                           4
PHY 107 Physics I*                                                                                4

School of Engineering and Physical Sciences Core                                               (38 Credits)

MAT 116 Pre-calculus**                                                                         0
CSE 115 Programming Language I (With Lab)**                                  4
MAT 125 Linear Algebra**                                                                    3
STA 172 Introduction to Probability & Statistics **                              3         
CHE 101 Chemistry I (With Lab)**                                                       4
PHY 107 Physics I (With Lab)**                                                           4
MAT 120 Calculus I                                                                                3
MAT 130 Calculus II                                                                              3
MAT 250 Calculus III                                                                             3
MAT 350 Engineering Mathematics                                                       3
PHY 108 Physics II (With Lab)                                                              4
CEE/EEE 452 Engineering Economics                                                   3
CEE 112 Computer Aided Drawing for Engineers                                1

*   In School of Engineering and Physical Sciences Core       
** Counts toward General Education

Major Requirements                                                                                                 (55 Credits)

  • Civil and Environmental Engineering Core                                               (43 Credits)

CEE 100 Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering             0
CEE 131 Construction Practices and Surveying                                      3
CEE 132 Surveying and GIS Lab                                                                        1
CEE 210 Engineering Mechanics                                                             3
CEE 214 Engineering Materials                                                               3
CEE 216 Engineering Materials Lab                                                        1
CEE 217 Solid Mechanics                                                                        3
CEE 218 Solid Mechanics Lab                                                                 1
CEE 241 Hydraulics and Open Channel Flow                                         3
CEE 242 Hydraulics and Open Channel Flow Lab                                 1
CEE 311 Structural Analysis I                                                                 3
CEE 312 Computer Aided Structural Analysis and Design Lab             1
CEE 313 Reinforced Concrete I                                                              3
CEE 314 Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures Lab                                    1
CEE 321 Geotechnical Engineering I                                                       3
CEE 322 Geotechnical Engineering Lab                                                  1
CEE 333 Transportation Engineering I                                                    3
CEE 334 Transportation Engineering Lab                                                1
CEE 341 Hydrology, Irrigation and Drainage Engineering                     3
CEE 351 Environmental Engineering I                                                    3
CEE 352 Environmental Engineering Lab                                               1
CEE 412 Computer Applications in Civil & Environmental Engineering-Lab 1

 

  • Capstone Design                                                                                            (3 Credits)

CEE 391 Junior Capstone                                                                         1
CEE 491 Senior Capstone                                                                                    2

 

  • Co-op/Internship                                                                                           (0 Credit)

             CEE 498                                                                                                  0

  • Civil and Environmental Engineering Electives (3 courses, 3 credits each) (9 credits)

The specialized elective courses will ensure students depth of understanding in a particular area of interest. Students must take minimum three courses (9 credits) to fulfill the requirements of specialized courses. These elective courses have embedded Labs or Design Labs, as per course requirements. One option is there as Special Topics, where a specialized elective course equivalent to 3 credit hours may be offered, other than the listed ones, depending on student demand and availability of specialized faculty. The Civil and Environmental Engineering Electives are as follows:    

CEE 411 Structural Analysis II                                                                3
CEE 413 Reinforced Concrete II                                                             3         
CEE 421 Geotechnical Engineering II                                                     3
CEE 432 Transportation Engineering II                                                   3
CEE 441 Water Resources Engineering                                                   3
CEE 451 Pollution Control and Waste Management                               3
CEE 400 Special Topic                                                                             3

  • Free Electives                                                                                                       (3 Credits)

 

There is a 3 credits open elective, which a student may choose to take from any discipline. However, similar courses already taken in the core or other categories will not be counted.

Course Descriptions

Civil and Environmental Engineering Core and Electives

CEE 100 Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering
History of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Professional bodies and societies; Civil Engineering Codes; Engineering Ethics; Branches of civil engineering; details on construction technologies for all branches of Civil Engineering; description of some outstanding civil engineering projects. 0 credit (Non-credit). Three hours of lecture per week.

CEE 131 Construction Practices and Surveying
Common construction practices; Planning and management of construction projects; Detail estimation of engineering projects; Analysis of rates and specifications. Introduction to surveying: chain survey; traverse survey; leveling and contouring; calculation of areas and volumes; problems of heights and distances; curves and curve ranging; uses of modern surveying equipments. Tachometry, Astronomical surveying and Photogrammetry. 3 Credits

CEE 132 Surveying and GIS Lab
Field work: Chain Survey, plane table Surveying; traverse survey; leveling and contouring; curve setting; tacheometry; demonstrations of total station survey; Remote sensing: introduction to global positioning system (GPS). Introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS). 1 Credit

CEE 210 Engineering Mechanics
Statics: review of vector mathematics; moment and force resultants; static equilibrium in two & three dimensions; structural analysis of trusses and cables; friction; centroids; center of gravity; distributed loadings; moments of inertia of areas; moments of inertia of masses; Dynamics: review of concepts of velocity and acceleration; dynamics of particles and rigid bodies; concepts of work, energy, momentum; introduction to vibrations; Prerequisite: MAT 125; 3 Credits

CEE 214 Engineering Materials
Mechanical behavior of materials; variability; atomic structures and properties of materials; properties, selection criteria, applications and uses of steel, aluminum, mineral aggregates, Portland cement, Portland cement concrete, asphalt, asphalt concrete, masonry, wood, protective coating materials, and composites; concrete mix design; laboratory experiments; Prerequisite: CEE 210; 3 Credits

 

CEE 216 Engineering Materials Lab
Experiments to test various physical and engineering properties of common civil engineering materials including aggregates, concrete, asphalt, and timber; Prerequisite: CEE 210; 1 Credit

CEE 217 Solid Mechanics
Introduction to the fundamental principles and methods of structural analysis(beams, frames), support conditions, axial force, shear force and bending moment diagrams of statically determinate systems, deflection of beams; stresses and strains in structural elements, constitutive laws, states of stress (axial, bending, shear,  and torsion);Transformation of stresses, instability of columns, virtual work principles. Prerequisite: CEE 210; 3 Credits

CEE 218 Solid Mechanics Lab
Experiments to test the mechanical properties various common civil engineering materials including steel, aluminum, alloys, etc.; Prerequisite: CEE 210; 1 Credit

 

CEE 241 Hydraulics and Open Channel Flow
Fluid properties, conservation laws, fluid kinematics, fluid flow concepts: continuity equations, energy and momentum equations, laminar and turbulent flow, incompressible flow, boundary layer theory, similitude and dimensional analysis, fluid measurement in orifices, nozzles, venturimeter, weirs and pitot tubes, open channel flow concepts and channel design. Civil engineering applications are emphasized and demonstrated in the laboratory experiments. Prerequisite: CEE 210 and MAT 120; 3 Credits

CEE 242 Hydraulics and Open Channel Flow Lab
Fluid flow measurement and related experiments are conducted in a laboratory setting. Determination of Center of Pressure,  Proof of Bernoulli’s Theorem,  Flow Through Venturimeter, Flow Through Orifice, Coefficient of Velocity by Coordinate Method, Flow through Mouth Piece, Flow over V-notch,  Flow Over Sharp Crested Weir and Fluid Friction in Pipe are conducted by the students; Prerequisite: CEE 210 and MAT 120; 1 Credit.

CEE 311 Structural Analysis I
Stability and determinacy of structures; wind and earthquake loads; approximate analysis of statically indeterminate structures. e.g. braced trusses, portal frames, mill bent and multi storied building frames; influence lines; moving loads on beams, frames and trusses; arch and cables; Analysis of statically indeterminate frames by moment distribution method. Prerequisite: CEE 217; 3 Credits.

CEE 312 Computer Aided Structural Analysis and Design Lab
Computer aided analysis of trusses and frames; design considerations for steel structures, e.g. high-rise building, modular bridge etc. Prerequisite: CEE 217; 1 Credit.

CEE 313 Reinforced Concrete I
Materials of reinforced concrete; loads and design philosophies, analysis of beam section under service loading, analysis and design of singly reinforced, doubly reinforced and T-beams according to USD methods; shear and diagonal tension; bond and anchorage; reinforced concrete floor and roof systems, one way stab and two way slab design by ACI coefficients. Design of columns; strength interaction diagrams, foundations, individual and combined footings, introduction to pre-stressed concrete. Prerequisite: CEE 217 and CEE 214; 3 Credits.

 

CEE 314 Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures Lab
Classroom tutorials on practical design considerations of reinforced concrete structures: detailing of concrete beams, columns, slabs and foundations; design of stair case, shear wall, water tanks; design considerations for slab bridge, deck girder bridge and balanced cantilever bridge; Prerequisite: CEE 217 and CEE 214; 1 Credit.

CEE 321 Geotechnical Engineering I
Introduction to soil mechanics and foundation engineering, including formation and classification of soils; phase relationships; permeability; effective stress; seepage; consolidation; shear strength; slope stability; retaining walls, geo-textiles; bearing capacity, types and selection of foundations; piles on clay, piles on sand; caissons, sheet pile, coffer dam; Earth retention systems, shore-piles, soldier piles, braced excavations. Prerequisite: CEE 214 and CEE 217; 3 Credits.

CEE 322 Geotechnical Engineering Lab
Soil exploration, Soil sampling and investigation techniques; Identification of soil; tests on physical properties of soil, mechanical properties of soil and consolidation characteristics of soil; Demonstrations on field tests, standard penetration test and cone penetration tests. Prerequisite: CEE 214 and CEE 217; 1 Credit.

CEE 333 Transportation Engineering I
An introduction to the design, planning, operation, management, and maintenance of transportation systems; Transportation Systems; Transportation Economics; Land-Use; Vehicle & Human Characteristics; Traffic Flow Characteristics; Geometric Design of Highways;  Public Passenger Transportation; Urban Transportation Planning; Transportation Safety; Highway Materials; Bituminous Paving Mix Design. Prerequisite: CEE 214; 3 Credits.

CEE 334 Transportation Engineering Lab
Tests on highway materials; bituminous mix design; quality control; traffic analysis and signal design; transportation modeling. Prerequisite: CEE 214; 1 Credit.

CEE 341 Hydrology, Irrigation and Drainage Engineering
Fundamentals of hydrologic science and its applications. Hydrologic processes such as precipitation, evaporation, transpiration by vegetation, infiltration, and storm runoff. Understanding of groundwater flow, hydraulics of wells, transport of pollutants, Probabilistic analysis and risk estimation for hydrologic variables, Irrigation engineering basics, Crop water requirement and design of irrigation facilities, Drainage engineering, Rainfall-runoff relationship in urban and rural context, drainage system design. Prerequisite: MAT 361, CEE 241; 3 Credits.

CEE 351 Environmental Engineering I
Human need of water-global and local perspectives, Water demand analysis, water supply sources, Water treatment and distribution facilities. Sewerage and wastewater engineering, Characteristics of wastewater, waste water collection and treatment facilities.  Applied hydraulics of pipelines and pumps. Urban and rural water supply options and appropriate technologies. Prerequisite: CEE 241, CHE 101/ CHE  120; 3 Credits.

CEE 352 Environmental Engineering Lab
Water and wastewater sampling techniques, sample preservation, physical, chemical and biological tests of water and wastewater; sampling and laboratory analysis of air, sampling and laboratory analysis of soil and solid waste. Prerequisite: CEE 241, CHE 101/ CHE  120; 1 Credit.

 

CEE 391 Junior Capstone
One design problem from each of the five major divisions of Civil and Environment Engineering. Written and oral presentation of completed projects. Pre-requisite: all 3rd (300) level core courses completed. 1 Credit.

CEE 400 Special Topics
Any advanced and/important topic directly related to civil and environmental engineering may be offered from the concerned department. The course will provide adequate lab or design experience to students. Pre-requisite: Concerned department will determine based on topic’s requirement. 3 Credits.

CEE 401 Professional Communication
This course introduces students to various kinds of technical and professional writing and communication skills.  Engineering project proposal writing, presenting study or research report, tender and quotation, official letter, email and memo, public speech and presentation skill, business communications, customer handling, complaint handling, fundamentals of marketing skill, fundamentals of human resources management at workplace, motivation and problem solving at work, dispute resolution and local/international negotiations.  Prerequisite: ENG 103.  3 Credits

CEE 411 Structural Analysis and Design II
Analysis of statically indeterminate structures (beams, trusses and frames) by Stiffness method and flexibility methods; Training in commonly used structural analysis computer program(s). Modeling of two- and three-dimensional structures Analysis methods and Design philosophies of bridges, building frames, and long-span cable structures. The lab component will cover design labs and experiments related to the topics covered in the theory part.  Prerequisite: CEE311; 3 Credits.

CEE 412 Computer Applications in Civil and Environmental Engineering-Lab
Application of computers to solution of civil and environmental engineering problems using various numerical methods; mathematical modeling and error analysis; solution of algebraic and differential equations; numerical differentiation and integration; curve-fitting; root-finding. Prerequisite: MAT 130; 1 Credit.

CEE 413 Reinforced Concrete Design II
Slab design by Direct Design Method and Equivalent frame method; Reciprocal load method to design columns under biaxial bending; rafts and pile caps; retaining walls; yield line analysis of slabs; strip method for slabs, concrete building systems; shear walls; stair design; water tanks design. The lab component will cover design labs and experiments related to the topics covered in the theory part.  Prerequisite: CEE 313; 3 Credits.

CEE 421 Geotechnical Engineering II
Critical study of case histories of projects in foundation engineering; current procedure for design and construction of foundations, embankments and waterfront structure. Seismic hazard analysis, cyclic response of soils and rock; wave propagation through soil and local site effects; liquefaction and post liquefaction behavior, seismic soil-structure of foundations and underground structures, seismic design of retaining walls, underground structures and tunnels. Construction and machine vibrations. Blasting. The lab component will cover design labs and experiments related to the topics covered in the theory part.  Prerequisite: CEE321; 3 Credits.

 

CEE 432 Transportation Engineering II
Traffic loading and volume; Design of flexible and rigid pavements; Pavement maintenance; Highway capacity; Intersection control and design; Highway drainage and drainage structures; Environmental aspects of transportation; Railway Engineering; Introduction to waterways and airways;        Planning and design of airports. The lab component will cover design labs and experiments related to the topics covered in the theory part.  Prerequisite: CEE333; 3 Credits.

CEE 441 Water Resource Engineering
Further topics on Open Channel Flow, Behavior of alluvial rivers; river pattern and morphological processes; sedimentation, river training and bank protection works; navigation and dredging; sediment movement in river channels, bed forms and flow regimes; flood and its causes; methods of flood management; structural and nonstructural measures, Hydraulic structures – brief description. The lab component will cover design labs and experiments related to the topics covered in the theory part.  Prerequisite: CEE 341; 3 Credits.

CEE 451 Pollution Control and Waste management
Pollution of air, water and soil, noise pollution, radioactive  and hazardous pollution, specific sources and effects of pollution, health implication, analysis and design of control methods for air, water and land pollution;  Basic concept and design of  Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP) for Industries Pollution in Bangladesh: Bangladesh Environment Conservation Act and Rule (ECA and ECR. Waste management steps and technologies, waste classification, transportation and dumping, sanitary landfill, incineration design consideration, resource recovery and recycling; Pollution sampling laboratory and Field trip (depending on the instructor). The lab component will cover design labs and experiments related to the topics covered in the theory part.  Prerequisite: CEE351; 3 Credits.

CEE 491 Senior Capstone
Design projects selected from problems submitted by the students, faculty and local industry; Industry projects are given preference as they are best suited for meeting the course objectives; Instructional phase includes (not limited to): communications, report writing, visual aids, design process (requirements/specifications/objections, synthesis/analysis, design evaluation, implementation, maintainability, manufacturability, economic and social influences etc.), proposal preparation, estimating, project management and scheduling, contracts etc.; Performance phase includes (not limited to): design team formation and organization,  design proposals, implementation of design process, project scheduling and management, design reviews, design simulation and testing, preparation of documentation, drawings, specifications, etc., written and oral presentation of completed projects. Prerequisite: all 4th (400) level core courses completed; 2 Credits.

CEE 498 Co-op/Internship
This course is designed to provide real life experience to students through co-op/internship in the public and private industry such as a real estate firm, civil engineering design or construction firm. Students will work there, prepare detailed report and present in front of a departmental committee.  Pre-requisite: Departmental authorization. Pre-requisite: all 4th (400) level core courses completed. 0 Credit (Non-Credit).

 

School of Engineering and Physical Sciences Core

MAT 116 Pre-Calculus
Behavior of functions in some depth including properties, graphs, inverses, transformations, and compositions. This course pays particular attention to linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. It covers trigonometric functions and inverse trigonometric functions as well. Prerequisite: High School Mathematics. 0 Credit, 3 hours of lecture per week.

MAT 120 Calculus-I
Covers basic calculus and analytic geometry. Coordinates, Graphs and Lines; Functions and Limits; Differentiations; Application of Differentiation; Integration; Logarithmic and Exponential Functions. Prerequisite: MAT116. 3 Credits.

MAT 125 Linear Algebra
Homogeneous and Nonhomogeneous System of Linear Equations, Echelon form, Gaussian Elimination Method (unique, infinite numbers and no solutions)Properties of Determinants, Determinant by Cofactor Expansion, Evaluating Higher Order Determinants by Row Reduction, Cramer’s Rule .Matrices and Matrix Operations, Transpose, Properties of Transpose, Triangular, Symmetric and Skew Symmetric Matrices, Inverse, Properties of Invertible Matrices, Method of Finding the Inverse of a Matrix, Further Results on   System of Linear Equations using Inverse Matrix Technique, Rank .Introduction to Vectors, Vector addition and Scalar multiplication, Norm of a vector, Dot Product, Projections, Euclidean n-Space, Real Vector Space, Subspace, Linear Combinations, Linear Dependence and Independence, Spanning Set, Basis, Dimensions, Solution Space, Null Space, Rank and Nullity. General Linear Transformation, Kernel and Image of Linear Mapping, Rank and Nullity of Linear Mapping. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, Cayley Hamilton Theorem, Diagonalization. Geometric Linear Programming, Applications in Business and Economics. Prerequisite: MAT116 or an adequate test score. 3 Credits.

MAT 130 Calculus-II
Second course in calculus and analytic geometry. Applications of Definite Integral; Hyperbolic Functions, Inverse Trigonometric and Hyperbolic Functions; Techniques of Integration; Improper Integrals: L’Hospitals Rule; Topics of Analytical Geometry; Polar Coordinates and Parametric Equations. Prerequisite:  MAT120. 3 Credits.

MAT 250 Calculus-III
Infinite Series; Three Dimensional Vector Spaces; Vector valued Functions; Partial Derivatives: Functions of two variables, limits and continuity, partial derivatives,  differentiability and chain rule, directional derivatives and gradients, tangent planes and normal vectors, maxima and minima of functions of two variables. Multiple Integrals: Double integrals, double integrals over non-rectangular regions, double integrals in polar coordinates, triple integrals, centroid, center of gravity, triple integrals in cylindrical and spherical coordinates, change of variables in multiple. Topics in vector calculus: Vector fields, line integrals, Green’s theorem, surface integrals, the divergence theorem, stokes theorem. Prerequisite:  MAT130. 3 Credits.

MAT 350 Engineering Mathematics
First and Second Order Differential Equations. First order ordinary differential equations, linear differential equations with constant coefficients, Laplace transformations, Fourier transformation, power-series solutions of differential equations, Bessel functions. Prerequisite:  MAT250. 3 Credits.

MAT 361 Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Basics of elementary probability theory; discrete and continuous random variables along with their probability distributions(cumulative distribution function; expected values and variance); special random variables: Bernoulli, binomial, geometric, negative binomial, Poisson, hyper-geometric, uniform, exponential and normal distributions);multivariate distributions(joint distributions; marginal and conditional distributions; covariance and correlation); descriptive statistics and sampling distribution of statistics; parameter estimation by moment and maximum likelihood method; comparing the performance of estimators using properties of unbiasedness, efficiency and minimum variance; confidence interval estimation for the mean and difference of two means; hypothesis testing on mean and difference of two means. Prerequisite: MAT250. 3 Credits.

STA 172 Introduction to Statistics
Data collection and presentation, descriptive statistics, probability distributions, sampling distributions and the central limit theorem, point estimation and hypothesis testing, one way ANOVA, goodness of fit and contingency table, correlation and regression analysis. Applications are taken from a broad variety of fields such as biological and medical sciences, engineering, social sciences and economics. Prerequisite: None. 3 Credits.

EEE 452 / CEE 452  Engineering Economics
Time value of money and the mathematics of finance (loans, mortgages, etc). Economic analysis in making engineering design and business decisions. Feasibility study and appraisal of engineering projects. Risk analysis and assessment. Project delivery and contract pricing. Project planning and scheduling (WBS, Gantt Chart, CPM, PERT etc.). Financial accounting. Services engineering, billing, regulation policies, outsourcing, PPP, strategy development, etc.  3 Credits.

CEE 112 Computer Aided Drawing for Engineers
Introduction to Computer Aided Design (CAD). Lettering, numbering and heading; plane geometry. Projection (Solid Geometry). Development and true shape: cube, pyramid, cone, prism; section and true shape. Isometric drawing, oblique drawing. Plan, elevation and section of engineering structures; reinforcement details of beams, columns, slabs, stairs etc. 1 Credit.

PHY 107 Physics I (With Lab)
Vectors, equations of motions, Newton’s laws, conservation laws of energy, linear momentum, Work-Energy theorem, extension of linear into rotational motion including the conservation laws, gravitation, simple harmonic motion, travelling waves, calorimetry, thermal equilibrium, 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics.
Laboratory Work: Introduction to Measurements and Statistical Error, Force table, Atwood machine, Hook’s law, Mass-spring oscillation, Simple pendulum, Compound pendulum and Static equilibrium. Prerequisite: MAT120 and Physics in HSC/A Level. 4 Credits.

PHY 108 Physics II (With Lab)
Electricity and Magnetism: Coulomb’s Law, Electric field and Gauss’s Law, Potential, Capacitance field, Magnetic forces, Induced Electromotive force, AC circuit. Electric Field and Potential:- Conceptually, Electric Field and Potential:- Discrete System , Electric Field and Potential:- Continuous System, Electric Field and Potential:- Gauss’s Law, Capacitors and Capacitance, Dielectric, Ohm’s Law, Circuit Theory, Magnetic Force I, Magnetic Force II, Biot-Severt Law, Ampere’s Law, Inductance I, Inductance II, Alternating Fields and Current I, Alternating Fields and Current II, Maxwell’s Equation, Magnetic Properties of  Matter.
Laboratory Work: Introduction to electric equipment, Verification of Ohm’s law, Charging and Discharging of capacitor, Time constant of a Circuit with resistor and capacitor in series and Magnetic induction. Prerequisite: MAT130 and PHY107. 4 Credits.

CHE 101 Chemistry I (With Lab)
This course covers fundamental principles of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, Chemical Equilibrium and Kinetics, gas laws and solutions. This course is appropriate as a basic chemistry course or as a science elective for students who have science, engineering, or mathematics majors. Upon completion, students will be able to- Define chemistry as the study of matter, can apply the basic concepts in their future studies and apply safe laboratory skills to solve problems in a cooperative environment.
Laboratory Work: Introducing analytical balance, proving the law of definite proportions, estimation of Avogadro's number, standardization of HCl, acid Base titration, determination of density. Prerequisite: None. 4 Credits.

CSE 115 Programming Language I (With Lab) 
This is the first course in the computer science programming sequence and is required of all computer science and engineering major with no prior programming experience. This course introduces the fundamental concepts of structured programming. Topics include fundamental programming constructs: syntax and semantics of a higher-level language, variables, expressions, and assignment, simple I/O to console and files, conditional and iterative control structures, functions and parameter passing, dynamic memory allocation; Fundamental data structures: arrays, records, strings and string processing; Software development methodology: Fundamental design concepts and principles, testing and debugging strategies; Fundamental of computers; Professionalism, codes of ethics and responsible conduct, copyrights, intellectual property, and software piracy.
Laboratory Work: The lab components will deal with problem solving program development using the method and techniques covered in the theory part. Prerequisite: None. 4 Credits.

Bachelor of Science in Textile Engineering                       (130 Credits)

 

  • University wide General Education Courses    (34 credits)
  • Languages                                                                                             (12 credits)

ENG 102 Introduction to Composition                                                  3
ENG 103 Intermediate Composition                                                      3
ENG 111 Public Speaking /                                                                    3
CEE401/EEE 401 Professional Communication                                   
ENG 115 Literature                                                                                3

  • Humanities                                                                                             (9 credits)

PHI 104 Introduction to Ethics                                                                          3
HIS 101 Bangladesh Culture and Heritage                                            3
HIS 102 Introduction to World Civilizations                                         3
HIS 203 Islamic History

  • Social Sciences                                                                                        (9 credits)

POL 101 Introduction to Political Science /POL 104 Governance        3
ECO 101 Micro Economics / ECO 104 Macro Economics                    3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology / ENV 203 Geography /                3
GEO 205 Bangladesh Geography / ANT 101 Anthropology    

  • Computer and Math Skills                                                                   -          

CSE 115  Programming Language I (With Lab)                                     4
MAT 125 Linear Algebra*                                                                      3
STA 172 Introduction to Statistics*                                                       3
MAT 116 Pre-calculus*                                                                           0

  • Sciences (with lab)                                                                                 (4 credits)

CHE 101 Chemistry I*                                                                           4
PHY 107 Physics I*                                                                                4
BIO 103 Biology I / ENV 107 Introductions to Environmental            4
Science / PSY 101 Introductions to Psychology / 
PBH 101 Introduction to Public Health                                                             

  • School of Engineering and Physical Sciences Core                                          (38 credits)

 

CSE 115 Programming Language I (With Lab) **                                 4
CHE 101 Chemistry I (With Lab) **                                                      4
MAT 116 Pre-calculus**                                                                         0
MAT 120 Calculus I                                                                                3
MAT 125 Linear Algebra**                                                                    3
MAT 130 Calculus II                                                                              3
MAT 250 Calculus III                                                                             3
MAT 350 Engineering Mathematics                                                       3
STA 172 Introduction Statistics **                                                        3         
PHY 107 Physics I (With Lab) **                                                          4
PHY 108 Physics II (With Lab)                                                              4
CEE/EEE 452 Engineering Economics                                                   3
CEE 112 Computer Aided Drawing for Engineers                                1

* In School of Engineering and Physical Sciences core       
** Counts toward General Education

  • Major Requirements                                                                               (55 credits)

 

  • Textile Engineering Core                                                                 (43 credits)

TXT 111 Textile Fibers                                                                             3
TXT 201 Yarn Manufacturing Technology I                                            4
TXT 202 Fabric Manufacturing Technology I                                          4
TXT 203 Wet Process Technology I                                                         4
TXT 204 Garments Technology I                                                             4
TXT 209 Elements of Mechanical and Electrical engineering                  4
TXT 301 Yarn Manufacturing Technology II                                          3
TXT 302 Fabric Manufacturing Technology II                                        3
TXT 303 Wet Process Technology II                                                       3
TXT 304 Garments Technology II                                                           3
TXT 310 Fabric Structure and Design                                                     4
TXT 205 Textile Testing and Quality Control                                          4

  • Textile Engineering Electives (Three courses, 3 credits each)       (9 credits)

 

  • Capstone Design                                                                                (3credits)

Project/Design                                                                                        3

  • Co-op/Internship      

CEE 498                                                                                 non-credit

  • Free Electives                                                                                     (3 credits)

 

 

Course Descriptions

TXT 111         Textile Fibers
Natural cellulose and protein fibers like cotton, jute, ramie, silk, wool. Properties and chemical structure of fiber forming polymers: Fiber classification and identification. Stress-strain properties. Relationship between polymer structure, fiber properties and utilization. Manufactured Textile Fibers, Technologies of Formation, structure and properties of regenerated and synthetic fibers such as viscose, cellulose acetate, polyamides, polyesters, polyacrylonitrile, elastomeric fibers, glass fibers, carbon fibers, bi-component fibers, PVA etc. 3 Credits

TXT 112         Polymer Science
Linear, branched and cross-linked polymers, homopolymers and copolymers, repeat unit, degree of polymerization, molecular weight and their measurements, viscosity, end-groups, polymerization and its classification, technology of polymerization, tactility, conformation of polymer chains, crystallization and melting point of polymers, glass transition temperature and crystalline melting point, depolymerization, polymer degradation, criteria of fiber forming polymer. 3 Credits

TXT 201         Yarn Manufacturing Technology I
The techniques available for manufacturing yarns from short-staple (cotton). The principles involved in mixing, blow-room, carding and draw frame. Details on these techniques and machinery. Also includes jute spinning technology up to draw frame. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 3 Credits

TXT 202         Fabric Manufacturing Technology I                                              
Weaving: Fundamentals of the conversion yarns into woven fabrics. Also includes weaving preparation such as winding, warping, sizing and beaming. Classification and description of shuttle looms. Study of jute Hessian and sacking looms. Knitting: Knitting yarn preparation such as winding, principles of knitting, elements of knitted ioop structure. Details on flat-bed and circular knitting machine, including hosiery machine. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 3 Credits

TXT 203         Wet Processing Technology I                                                          
Introduction to the science and technology used in textile wet processing. Topics include pretreatment: singeing, desiring, scouring and bleaching. Technology of dyeing and printing. Structure of direct, acid, basic and vat dyes and their application on different fibers. Dyeing and printing methods and machinery. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 4 Credits

TXT 204         Garments Technology I                                                                   
Garments manufacturing sequence, sample garments making, basic components of shirt, trouser and their types. Detail on marker making, fabric spreading, fabric cutting, interlining etc. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 2 Credits

TXT 205         Textile Testing and Quality Control I                                            
Counting method for lap, sliver, roving and yarn. Fiber Testing: Testing on fibers such as length, fineness, strength, maturity, color, neps, trash, dust, moisture etc. and conventional instruments related to these tests including modern ones such as High-volume Instruments. (HVI), Advanced Fiber Information System (AFIS), User Quick spin System, User Microdots & Trash Analyzer (MDTA) etc. Yarn Testing: Single and bundle strength of yarn, testing of frequently-occurring yarn faults in Evenness Tester, seldom-occurring yarn faults in Classmate and User quantum yarn clearer, Quality Control: Discussion on quality, quality control, quality assurance and quality management. Steps taken in different steps of yarn manufacturing process on the basis of laboratory test data. On-line and Off-line quality control; norms of quality parameters, User Statistics for fiber, sliver, roving and yarns. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 3 Credits

TXT 206         Textile Physics                                                                                              
Analyses of physical structure of fibers by X-ray diffraction, Infra-red radiation, Optical microscope, viscoelastic analysis, scanning electron microscope, density. Detailed study of fiber properties like tensile, bending, frictional, optical and thermal properties. Creep and stress relaxation of fibers. Models based on viscoelastic behavior of fibers. Static electricity of fibers and its effect in textile processing. Fiber migration and yarn structure.Relation of yarn twist with strength. Tensile testing of fabric, fabric buckling, shear and drape etc. 3 Credits

 

MEE 209        Elements of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering                                
Thermodynamics and heat transfer, hydraulics, compressed air, pumps, boilers, steam engine, diesel and petrol engine, gas turbine. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. Elements of electrical engineering such as DC current, A.C. current, sub-station, system network, system protection, electrical hazards. Elements of electronics e.g, diodes, transistors, amplifiers, rectifiers, voltage amplification, power amplification, photo sensor and transducer, integrated circuits (IC.). Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 3 Credits

TXT 301         Yarn Manufacturing Technology II                                              
Continuation of yarn manufacturing techniques of short-staple fibers after draw frame from Yarn Manufacturing Technology I. This subject includes lap former, comber, speed frame, ring frame, doubling, twisting, reeling, building and baling. Long staple: jute spinning frame. Brief introduction of rotor spinning system. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 4 Credits

TXT 302         Fabric Manufacturing Technology                                                
Weaving: Different types of shedding techniques such as tappet, dobby and jacquard. ‘Picking and beating mechanism. Take-up nd let-off mechanism. Elementary study of modern looms such as air-jet, rapier, projectile loom etc. Knitting: Weft knitting mechanism and machines: Double cylinder hosiery machine, closed toe hosiery machine, circular half hose machine, stockings and panty hose production. Warp knitting mechanism and machines: Classification of warp knitting machinery. Tricot and Raschel machines, Compound needle warp knitting machine, crochet machine. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 4 Credits

TXT 303         Wet Processing Technology II                                            
Technology of dyeing and printing with sculpture, azoic, reactive and disperse dyestuffs of different fibers. Printing with pigment. Numerous techniques of finishing like shearing and cropping, calendaring, raising, folding, sanforising, mercerization and perchmentisation, resin finishing, water repellency, flame retardency etc. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 1 Credit

TXT 304         Garments Technology II                                                     
Sewing, sewing machines, sewing thread, alternative methods of joining fabrics such as by welding, adhesives, fusing, molding, trimmings, press and finishing. Folding and packing. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 2 Credits

TXT 310         Fabric Structure and Design                                                           
Structures of woven fabrics like plain fabrics, twill fabrics, satin and sateen weaves, drafting, denting and pegging. Structure analyses of fancy fabrics. Study of the various structures of knitted fabrics such as plain, rib, straight lock, cross lock, half- cardigan, full-cardigan, weft locknit etc. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 3 Credits

TXT 401         Yarn Manufacturing Technology III                                                                     
Study of the modern trend and developments in ring spinning system from blow-room to bailing; raw material management; blending and blending delay; count constancy, irregularity and autolevellers, automation in different stages and its relation with productivity and quality. Processing parameters at all stages. Waste control at every stages. Evaluation of properties of spun yarns; review of different spinning calculation and Spin plan. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 3 Credits

TXT 402         Yarn Manufacturing Technology IV
Detail study of processing synthetic fibers e.g., polyester, acrylic and their blends with cotton; Depth study of rotor, air-jet, friction and other new short staple spinning methods; Modern long staple spinning systems especially for jute such as repo, spin-guard, wrap spun, core spun and twist less spinning; Acrylic spinning. 3 Credits

TXT 403         Special Yarn Production                                                                 
Two-fold, manifold, cabled and core yarns, twisting and doubling machines, Manufacture of fancy yarns. Tow-to-top conversion, methods of producing textured yarns, twines, rope etc. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 1 Credit

TXT 404         Fabric Manufacturing Technology III                               
Weaving: Detail on modern automatic looms such as air-jet, rapier (flexible and rigid), water-jet, projectile and multiphase looms. Different classes, f jacquards, system of harness mounting, card cutting and lacing. Study on broad looms, cloth costing, cloth faults and remedies, factors controlling loom efficiency etc. Knitting: Colored stitch in weft knitting, weft knitted jacquard, rib jacquard. Production of weft knitted fabrics, loop transfer stitches, specialty weft knitted fabrics, laying in warp knitting, multiple guide bar warp knitting etc. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 3 Credits

TXT 405         Fabric Manufacturing Technology IV
Weaving: Electronic dobby and jacquard, color selection by computer programming; Detail on automation of modern looms such as weft replenishment, weft patterning, warp protector and stop motion; Terry loom and velveteen loom; Sizing of blended and synthetic yarns; Different methods of drying after sizing, means of uniform drying; Warp and weft strain and calculation; Variation in pick spacing; Different kinds of selvedges. Knitting: Production of knit goods from blended yarns; Linear and non-linear cams in weft knitting; Kinetics and economics of weft knitting Multi-axial Rachel machine etc. Nonwoven: Definitions and classifications, conventional and modern techniques for the production of nonwovens; Properties and uses of nonwoven fabrics etc. 3 Credits

TXT 406         Special Fabric Production                                                   
Production, features and uses of laminate, tape, belt, label, braid, lappet, swivel, velvets and velveteen carpet, triaxial fabrics, coated & filter fabrics etc. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 1 Credit

TXT 407         Wet Processing Technology III                                           
Applied Chemistry: Water treatment, different types of surface active agents. Chemistry, properties and uses of various acids, alkalis, salts etc. Dyeing: Dye aggregation, dyeing kinetics, structure and application of mordant dyes. Printing: Use of special type of synthetic and emulsion thickener, methods of screen and roller preparation, Finishing: Different types of softening agents and application, special finishing treatments such as rot-proofing, mildew-proofing etc. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 3 Credits

TXT 408         Wet Processing Technology IV
Pretreatment.: Vapour-Ioc and solvent scouring, bleaching and mercerizing effects. Dyeing: Additive and subtractive colour mixing. Dying of synthetic fibers such as nylon, acrylic, dyeing of blended fibers and fabrics. Color measurements, spectrophotometers, color fastness, assessment of color fastness with grey scale. Printing: Transfer printing, jet printing, flock printing, burn-out printing. Finishing: Low-wet pick-up finishing, optical brightening agents etc. 3 Credits

TXT 409         Special Wet Processing                                                                    
Foam technology, solvent dyeing, dyeing under hypercritical conditions, human color visions, trichromatictheory of color vision and color matching equations, metamerism. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 1 Credit

TXT 410         Garments Technology III                                                    
Garments washing: concept and requirement of washing, different types of ashes such as caustic wash, bleach wash, enzyme wash, stone wash, acid wash. Swatch making and garments dyeing. Factorial study of seam strength, mechanism of seam slippage, seam strength prediction, seam strength testing. Fabric sew ability assessment. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 3 Credits

TXT 411         Garments Technology IV
Production planning, production control and production management, line balancing. Tools of planning: Work measurements, time study, motion study and method study, material handling and transportation systems of garments components. Computer pattern making tools and techniques; Principles of purchasing, market utilization variation, fabric loss outside marker, control of material waste, production engineering etc. 2 Credits

TXT 412         Special Garments Production
Fashion house in Europe and US, the conversion of fashion design to the ready-made clothing industry. Fashion trends in different countries. Modern trends of fashion and design. Concept of apparel design, heat transfer and comfort. Thermal underwear, wind-proof garments, breathable fabrics and garments, fire-proof garments, rain coats, racing drivers garments etc. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 1 Credit

TXT 415         Maintenance of Textile Machinery
Maintenance: Types of maintenance, planning and organizing maintenance, repair cycle, maintenance stages, lubrication and lubricants, iflspection. Material handling: conveyor used in textile mills, hydraulic press and lift, truck hoist. Air-conditioning: comfort condition, psychometric chart, heating, cooling, humidification and dehumidification, ventilation, filtration, mill illumination. Machine erection: floor preparation, foundation, machine fixation, leveling etc. Various tools used in maintenance. Maintenance schedule. Adequate lab course embedded to cover the topics. 3 Credits

TXT 418         Textile Testing and Quality Control II
General: Introduction to quality control & assurance department. Duties and responsibilities of quality control personnel. Use of standards BSTI, ISO, ASTM, Oeko-Tex, British, Pakistan and Indian standards. Introduction to TQM and ISO 9000 series of quality management systems. Fabric, Wet Processing and Garments: Fabric testing such as fabric dimension, crimp of woven and knitted. fabrics. Tensile testing, ballistic and bursting tests, stiffness, handle, drape, air and water permeability, crease recovery etc. Carpet testing. Inspection and quality control of dyed yen, fabric and finished garments, in-process inspection. Product quality audit, effect of process control on costs and quality. 3 Credits

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Engineering (BSCSE)

Program Educational Objectives

The BSCSE curricula are designed to provide the fundamental principles of engineering and science, and the broad based general education essentials to the continued professional growth of the typical graduate. The general objective of the BSCSE degree program is to prepare graduates to become successful in their chosen career paths. Specifically, the graduates of the program will be able to:

PEO1- Expertise: Excel as professionals in computer science and engineering by building upon the problem-solving skills and knowledge, teamwork abilities, and communication skills acquired through the program;
PEO2-Enhancement: Participate in lifelong-learning activities that enhance their professional and personal development through continuing studies, including graduate studies, professional trainings, and licensure;
PEO3-Engagement: Demonstrate globally aware social justice, ethical and leadership role and responsibilities through personal and professional contributions to society.

Curriculum:

The BS in Computer Science and Engineering degree program requires a minimum of 130 credits in about 4 years (12 Semesters) to complete. The breakdown of the total 130semester credit hours is given as follows:

 

Category

Credits

University General Education Courses

34

School of Engineering & Physical Sciences (SEPS) Core

38

CSE Major Core

42

CSE Major Capstone Design Project

4

CSE Major Electives

9

Open Electives

3

Intern/Co-op /Directed Research

Non-credit

Total Credit

130  Credits

  • University wide General Education Courses    (34 Credits)

 

  • Languages                                                                                             (12 Credits)

ENG 102 Introduction to Composition                                                  3
ENG 103 Intermediate Composition                                                      3
ENG 111 Public Speaking /                                                                    3
CEE 401/EEE 401 Professional Communication                                  
ENG 115 Literature                                                                                3

  • Humanities                                                                                             (9 Credits)

PHI 104 Introduction to Ethics                                                                          3
HIS 101 Bangladesh Culture and Heritage                                            3
HIS 102 Introduction to World Civilizations /                                       3
HIS 203 Islamic History

  • Social Sciences                                                                                        (9 Credits)

POL 101 Introduction to Political Science / POL 104 Governance       3
ECO 101 Micro Economics / ECO 104 Macro Economics                    3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology / ENV 203 Geography /                3
GEO 205 Bangladesh Geography / ANT 101 Anthropology    

  • Computer and Math Skills                                                                   -          

CSE 115  Programming Language I (With Lab)                                     4
MAT 125 Linear Algebra*                                                                      3
MAT 361 Introduction to Probability & Statistics*                               3
MAT 116 Pre-calculus*                                                                           0

  • Sciences (with lab)                                                                                 (4 credits)

CHE 101 Chemistry I*                                                                           4
PHY 107 Physics I*                                                                                4
BIO 103 Biology I / ENV 107 Introductions to Environmental            4
Science / PSY 101 Introductions to Psychology / 
PBH 101 Introduction to Public Health                                                 

  • School of Engineering and Physical Sciences Core                                          (38 credits)

 

CSE 115 Programming Language I (With Lab) **                                 4
CHE 101 Chemistry I (With Lab) **                                                      4
MAT 116 Pre-calculus**                                                                         0
MAT 120 Calculus I                                                                                3
MAT 125 Linear Algebra**                                                                    3
MAT 130 Calculus II                                                                              3
MAT 250 Calculus III                                                                             3
MAT 350 Engineering Mathematics                                                       3
MAT 361 Introduction to Probability & Statistics **                            3         
PHY 107 Physics I (With Lab)**                                                           4
PHY 108 Physics II (With Lab)                                                              4
EEE 452 Engineering Economics                                                           3
CEE 112 Computer Aided Drawing for Engineers                                1

* In School of Engineering and Physical Sciences core       
** Counts toward General Education

CSE Core Courses

(42 Credits)

 

 

CSE 173 Discrete Mathematics

3

CSE 215 Programming Language II

3

CSE 215L Programming Language II Lab

1

CSE 225 Data Structures and Algorithm

3

CSE 225L Data Structures and Algorithm Lab

0

CSE 231 Digital Logic design

3

CSE 231L Digital Logic design Lab

0

EEE 141 Electrical Circuits I

3

EEE 141L Electrical Circuits I Lab

1

EEE 111 Analog Electronics I

3

EEE 111L Analog Electronics I Lab

1

CSE 311 Database Systems 

3

CSE 311L Database Systems Lab

0

CSE 323 Operating Systems Design

3

CSE 327 Software Engineering

3

CSE 331 Microprocessor Interfacing & Embedded Sys.

3

CSE 331L Microprocessor Interfacing &Emb. Sys. Lab

0

CSE 373 Design and Analysis of Algorithms

3

CSE 332 Computer Organization and Architecture

3

CSE 425 Concepts of Programming Language                  

3

CSE Major Capstone Design 

 (4 Credits)

CSE 299   Junior Design

1

CSE 499A  Senior Design I

1.5

CSE 499B  Senior Design II

1.5

Internship/Co-op      
CSE 498 Intern/Co-op /Directed Research    Non-credit

CSE Specialized Elective Courses                                                                (9 Credits)

The specialized elective courses will ensure students’ depth understanding in a particular area of interest. Students must take a minimum of three courses (minimum 9 credits) to fulfill the requirements of Specialized Courses. The courses will be selected and offered from the list of approved elective courses. A maximum of six courses may be offered per year, among which three can be taken. One option is there as Special Topics, where an elective course equivalent to 3 credit hours may be offered depending on student demand and availability of specialized faculty.

Open Elective Course                                                                                   (3 Credits)
There is a 3 credit open elective, which a student may choose to take from any discipline. However, similar courses already taken in the core or other categories will not be counted.

Course Descriptions

CSE 115         Programming language I
This is the first course in the computer science programming sequence and is required of all computer science and engineering major with no prior programming experience. This course introduces the fundamental concepts of structured programming. Topics include fundamental programming constructs: syntax and semantics of a higher-level language, variables, expressions, and assignment, simple I/O to console and files, conditional and iterative control structures, functions and parameter passing, dynamic memory allocation; Fundamental data structures: arrays, records, strings and string processing; Software development methodology: Fundamental design concepts and principles, testing and debugging strategies; Fundamental of computers; Professionalism, codes of ethics and responsible conduct, copyrights, intellectual property, and software piracy. The lab components will deal with problem solving program development using the method and techniques covered in the theory part. Prerequisite: None.  4 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 1 credit)

CSE 173 Discrete Mathematics
Introduction to discrete mathematical structures.  Topics include sets, propositions, Boolean algebra, relations, functions, algebraic systems, monoids, fields, groups, ring, induction, recursion, permutations and combinations, recurrence relation, generating functions and solutions, principles of counting, principles of inclusion and exclusion, discrete probability. Prerequisite: CSE 115. 3 Credits

CSE 215 Programming Language II
This is a more traditional programming course for computer science majors and other students with deep interest in the subject. This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of object oriented programming. Actual programs are constructed using one or more high level languages with emphasis placed on the concepts introduced in the previous course. Java is primarily chosen as the programming language in this course. Reusability, readability, and documentation are also strongly stressed. This course has separate mandatory laboratory session every week as CSE215L.  Prerequisite: CSE 173. 4 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 1 credit).

CSE 225 Data Structures & Algorithm
An introduction to the theory and practice of data structuring techniques. Topics include internal data representation, abstract data types, stacks, queues, list structures, recursive data structures, graphs and networks. Concept of object orientation as a data abstraction technique will be introduced. This course has separate mandatory laboratory session every week as CSE 225L. Prerequisite: CSE 215. 3 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 0 credit).

CSE 231 Digital Logic Design
This course provides an introduction to logic design and basic tools for the design of digital logic systems. A basic idea of number systems will be provided, followed by a discussion on combinational logic: logic gates, Boolean algebra, minimization techniques, arithmetic circuits (adders, subtractors), basic digital circuits (decoders, encoders, multiplexers, shift registers), programmable logic devices (PROM, PAL, PLA). The course will then cover sequential circuits: flip-flops, state transition tables and diagrams, state minimization, state machines, design of synchronous/asynchronous counters, RAM/ROM design. An introduction to programmable logic will also be provided. Hands-on experience will be provided through project on design of a logic system. This course has separate mandatory laboratory session every week as CSE 231L. Prerequisite: CSE 173. 3 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 0 credit).

EEE 111 Analog Electronics
In this course, a variety of electronic devices used in the design of analog electronics are studied. Basic understanding of semiconductor devices is covered. Emphasis is placed on diodes, BJT, and FET. Small and large signal characteristics and models of electronic devices, analysis and design of elementary electronic circuits are also included. This course has separate mandatory laboratory session every week as EEE 111L. Prerequisite: EEE 141. 4 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 1 credit).

EEE 141 Electrical Circuits I
The primary goal of this course is to introduce the basics of DC Electrical  Circuits. The concepts of current, voltage, power, and energy are studied. Topics include DC sources, resistance, capacitance, inductance, and magnetism. Resistive circuits are analyzed using Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s Laws. Circuits are also solved using superposition, Thevenin, Norton, nodal, and mesh analyses. Computer-aided analysis techniques using PSPICE are also introduced. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as EEE141L. Prerequisite: None. 4 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 1 credit).

CSE 311 Database Systems
Examines the logical organization of databases: the entity-relationship model; the hierarchical, network, and relational data models and their languages. Functional dependencies and normal forms.  Design, implementation, and optimization of query languages; security and integrity; concurrency control, and distributed database systems. This course has separate mandatory laboratory session every week as CSE 311L. Prerequisites: CSE 225. 3 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 0 credit).

CSE 323 Operating Systems Design
Operating Systems Design: An introduction to the structure of modern operating systems. Topics include operating systems structure, asynchronism, mutual exclusion, deadlocks, monitors, process state transition, interrupts, context switching, storage management for both real and virtual storage, processor scheduling, multi-processing, auxiliary storage management, computer systems performance, network and security. Prerequisite: CSE 332. 3 Credits

CSE 327 Software Engineering
Fundamentals of software engineering methods and different software process models. Basics of software project management and requirement engineering. Managing software evolution and designing software domain models. Understanding and learning different software patterns. Software testing strategies such as unit testing and integration testing. Aspects of people management. Prerequisite: CSE 311. 3 Credits

 

CSE 331 Microprocessor Interfacing & Embedded System
Fundamentals of assembly language programming.Basics of microprocessor and memory models. Designing instruction set, basic microcomputer component such as ALU, register, processing unit and control unit. Memory and digital circuit interfacing with microprocessor. This course has separate mandatory laboratory session every week as CSE 331L.  Prerequisite: CSE 323. 3 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 0 credit).

CSE 332 Computer Organization and Architecture
Design of ALU and a simple processor with common bus system, computer instructions and its executions, interrupt handling, control logic design: random logic and microprogramming; machine-level programming, RISC architecture and hardware, IEEE754 floating point representation and addition, Booth’s algorithm for multiplication; pipelining; data hazards and forwarding unit, control hazards and their remedies. Prerequisite:  CSE 231. 3 Credits

CSE 373 Design and Analysis of Algorithms
Complexity analysis, Divide and Conquer Problems, sorting and searching, Dynamic Programming, Greedy Algorithms, Amortized Analysis, Graph algorithms, Introduction to NP-Completeness, Approximation Algorithms. Prerequisite: CSE225, MAT 361. 3 Credits

CSE 425 Concepts of Programming Language
An introduction to the structure of programming languages.  Formal specification of syntax and semantics; structure of algorithmic, list processing, string manipulating, data description, and simulation languages:  basic data types, operations, statement types, and program structure; macro language and their implementation; and run-time representation of programs and data. Prerequisite: CSE 327. 3 Credits

CSE 299 Junior Design
Introductory design course to introduce the basics steps of design project implementation. It will be a multidisciplinary team work. Each team has to develop a design project, submit a written report and oral presentation of completed projects. Instructional phase includes (not limited to): communications, technical report writing, visual aids, design process etc. Prerequisite: Min 60 credits completed including CSE225, CSE231, ENG111, PHI104, PHY108, MAT350. 1 Credit

CSE 496 Special Topics
Availability of a faculty to teach a course on current topic of interests not listed in the curriculum. (as an example: CSE 495 Quantum Computing, CSE 495 Optical Computing etc.) Variable credits

CSE 498 Internship/Co-op/Directed Research
This course is designed to provide experience to students through internship/Co-op works in the public and private industry related to Electrical, Electronics, Telecommunication, and Computing Technology or through advanced research in relevant academic fields. Students will work there, prepare detailed report and present in front of a departmental committee. Prerequisite: Minimum 80 credits completed. Non-credit

CSE 499A and CSE499B Senior Design I & II
This is a Senior level course, after a student has completed the core CSE, core Math, and core Science courses. This "capstone design course" involves multidisciplinary teams of students who build and test custom designed systems, components or engineering processes. Design projects selected from problems submitted by the students, faculty and local industry; Industry projects are given preference as they are best suited for meeting the course objectives; Instructional phase includes (not limited to): communications, report writing, visual aids, design process (requirements/specifications/objections, synthesis/analysis, design evaluation, implementation, maintainability, manufacturability, economic and social influences etc.), proposal preparation, estimating, project management and scheduling, contracts etc.; Performance phase includes (not limited to): design team formation and organization,  design proposals, implementation of design process, project scheduling and management, design reviews, design simulation and testing, preparation of documentation, drawings, specifications, etc., written and oral presentation of completed projects.  Prerequisite: CSE499A - 100 credits completed including all CSE core courses. CSE499B - the prerequisite is CSE499A. 3 Credits (CSE499A 1.5 cr. + CSE499B 1.5 cr.)

Bachelor of Science in Electrical and Electronic Engineering (BSEEE)

Program Educational Objectives

The BSEEE curricula are designed to provide the fundamental principles of engineering and science, and the broad based general education essentials to the continued professional growth of the typical graduate.  The general objective of the BSEEE degree program is to prepare graduates to become successful in their chosen career paths. Specifically, the graduates of the program will be able to:

PE1- Expertise: Excel as professionals in electrical and electronics engineering by building upon the problem-solving skills and knowledge, teamwork abilities, and communication skills acquired through the program.
PE2-Enhancement: Participate in lifelong-learning activities that enhance their professional and personal development through continuing studies including graduate studies, professional trainings, and licensure.
PE3-Engagement: Demonstrate globally aware social justice, ethical and leadership role and responsibilities through personal and professional contributions to society.

Curriculum:

The BS in Electrical and Electronic Engineering degree program requires a minimum of 130 credits, taking about 4 years (12 Semesters) to complete. 

The breakdown of the total 130 semester credit hours is given as follows:

 

Category

Credit

University General Education Courses

34

School of Engineering & Physical Sciences (SEPS) Core

38

EEE Major Core

42

EEE Major Capstone Design Project

4

EEE Major Electives

9

Open Electives

3

Intern/Co-op /Directed Research

Non-credit

Total Credit

130  Credits

 

 

  • University wide General Education Courses    (34 credits)
  • Languages                                                                                  (12 credits)

ENG 102 Introduction to Composition                                                  3
ENG 103 Intermediate Composition                                                      3
ENG 111 Public Speaking /                                                                    3
CEE 401/EEE 401 Professional Communication                                  
ENG 115 Literature                                                                                3

 

  • Humanities                                                                                 (9 credits)

PHI 104 Introduction to Ethics                                                                          3
HIS 101 Bangladesh Culture and Heritage                                            3
HIS 102 Introduction to World Civilizations /                                       3
HIS 203 Islamic History

  • Social Sciences                                                                            (9 credits)

POL 101 Introduction to Political Science / POL 104 Governance       3
ECO 101 Micro Economics / ECO 104 Macro Economics                    3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology / ENV 203 Geography /                3
GEO 205 Bangladesh Geography / ANT 101 Anthropology    

  • Computer and Math Skills                                                                   -          

CSE 115  Programming Language I (With Lab) *                                  4
MAT 125 Linear Algebra*                                                                      3
MAT 361 Introduction to Probability & Statistics*                               3
MAT 116 Pre-calculus*                                                                           0

  • Sciences (with lab)                                                                       (4 credits)

CHE 101 Chemistry I*                                                                           4
PHY 107 Physics I*                                                                                4
BIO 103 Biology I / ENV 107 Introductions to Environmental            4
Science / PSY 101 Introductions to Psychology / 
PBH 101 Introduction to Public Health                                                 

  • School of Engineering and Physical Sciences Core                              (38 credits)

 

CSE 115 Programming Language I (With Lab) **                                 4
CHE 101 Chemistry I (With Lab) **                                                      4
MAT 116 Pre-calculus**                                                                         0
MAT 120 Calculus I                                                                                3
MAT 125 Linear Algebra**                                                                    3
MAT 130 Calculus II                                                                              3
MAT 250 Calculus III                                                                             3
MAT 350 Engineering Mathematics                                                       3
MAT 361 Introduction to Probability & Statistics **                            3         
PHY 107 Physics I (With Lab)**                                                           4
PHY 108 Physics II (With Lab)                                                              4
EEE 452 Engineering Economics                                                           3
CEE 112 Computer Aided Drawing for Engineers                                1

* In School of Engineering and Physical Sciences core       
** Counts toward General Education

EEE Core Courses

             (42 Credits)

 

 

EEE 141 Electrical Circuits I

3

EEE 141L Electrical Circuits I Lab

1

EEE 111 Analog Electronics I

3

EEE 111L Analog Electronics I Lab

1

EEE 211 Digital Logic design

3

EEE 211L Digital logic design Lab

0

EEE 241 Electrical Circuits II

3

EEE 241L Electrical Circuits II Lab

1

EEE 221 Signals and Systems

3

EEE 311 Analog Electronics II

3

EEE 311L Analog Electronics II Lab

1

EEE 361 Electromagnetic Fields & Waves

3

EEE 312 Power Electronics

3

EEE 312L Power Electronics Lab

0

EEE 321 Intro to Communications Systems

3

EEE 321L Intro to Communications Systems Lab

0

EEE 342 Control Engineering 

3

EEE 342L Control Engineering Lab  

1

EEE 362 Power Systems

3

EEE 362L Power Systems Lab

0

EEE 363 Electrical Machines 

3

EEE 363L Electrical Machines Lab

1

EEE Major Capstone Design 

 (4 Credits)

EEE 299   Junior Design  

1

EEE 499A Senior Design I

1.5

EEE 499B Senior Design II

1.5

Internship/Co-op      
            EEE 498 Intern /Co-op /Directed Research                                           Non-credit

EEE Specialized Elective Courses                                                    (9 Credits)

The specialized elective courses will ensure students’ depth understanding in a particular area of interest. Students must take a minimum of three courses (minimum 9 credits) to fulfil the requirements of Specialized Courses. The courses will be selected and offered from the list of approved elective courses. A maximum of six courses may be offered per year, among which three can be taken. One option is there as Special Topics, where an elective course equivalent to 3 credit hours may be offered, depending on student demand and availability of specialized faculty.

 

Open Elective Course                                                                       (3 Credits)
There is a 3 credit open elective, which a student may choose to take from any discipline. However, similar courses already taken in the core or other categories will not be counted.

Course Descriptions

EEE 111 Analog Electronics I
In this course, a variety of electronic devices used in the design of analog electronics are studied. Basic understanding of semiconductor devices is covered. Emphasis is placed on diodes, BJT, and FET. Small and large signal characteristics and models of electronic devices, analysis and design of elementary electronic circuits are also included. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as EEE 111L. Prerequisite: EEE 141. 4 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 1 credit).

EEE 141 Electrical Circuits I
The primary goal of this course is to introduce the basics of DC Electrical Circuits. The concepts of current, voltage, power, and energy are studied. Topics include DC sources, resistance, capacitance, inductance, and magnetism. Resistive circuits are analysed using Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s Laws. Circuits are also solved using superposition, Thevenin, Norton, nodal, and mesh analyses. Computer-aided analysis techniques using PSPICE are also introduced. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as EEE141L. Prerequisite: None. 4 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 1 credit)

EEE 211 Digital Logic Design
This course provides an introduction to logic design and basic tools for the design of digital logic systems. A basic idea of number systems will be provided, followed by a discussion on combinational logic: logic gates, Boolean algebra, minimization techniques, arithmetic circuits (adders, subtractors), basic digital circuits (decoders, encoders, multiplexers, shift registers), programmable logic devices (PROM, PAL, PLA). The course will then cover sequential circuits: flip-flops, state transition tables and diagrams, state minimization, state machines, design of synchronous/asynchronous counters, RAM/ROM design. An introduction to programmable logic will also be provided. Hands-on experience will be provided through project on design of a logic system. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as EEE 211L. Prerequisite: EEE 111. 3 Credits  (Theory 3 + Lab 0 credit).

EEE 221 Signals and Systems
Analysis techniques for signals and systems. Signal representation, including Fourier and LaPlace transforms. System definitions and properties, such as linearity, causality, time invariance, and stability.Use of convolution, transfer functions and frequency response to determine system response.Applications to circuit analysis. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as EEE 221L. Prerequisite: MAT 350, CSE115L. 3 Credits  (Theory 3 + Lab 0 credit).

EEE 241 Electrical Circuits II
Sinusoids and Phasors, DC circuit Laws in AC circuits, Impedance combinations, Nodal and Mesh Analysis, Circuit theorems, AC Power concepts and Applications, Power Factor Correction, Three Phase Circuits, Power in Three Phase Circuits, Mutual Inductance, Transformers, Use of MATLAB and PSpice for AC Circuit Analysis. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as EEE 241L Prerequisite: EEE 141. 4 Credits  (Theory 3 + Lab 1 credit).

EEE 299  Junior Design
Introductory design course to introduce the basics steps of design project implementation. It will be a multidisciplinary teamwork. Each team has to develop a design project, submit a written report and oral presentation of completed projects. Instructional phase includes (not limited to): communications, technical report writing, visual aids, design process etc. Prerequisite: Min 60 credits completed including EEE211, EEE311, ENG111, PHI104, PHY108, MAT350. 1 Credit

EEE 311 Analog Electronics II
Design methods to fix gain and bandwidth specifications in amplifiers are presented. Design use of feedback technique is presented. Properties and design amplification of operational amplifiers are studied. Emphasis is given on electronic circuitry used in communication engineering. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as EEE 311L. Prerequisite: EEE 111. 4 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 1 credit)

EEE 312 Power Electronics
This introductory course will give an overview of the major aspects of power electronics. Emphasis will be given on basic theoretical methods of calculation and design of important power electronic circuits such as: ac to dc uncontrolled and controlled rectifiers, ac voltage controllers, dc-dc converters, dc to ac inverters and power supplies. The course will also cover power semiconductor devices and wide application aspects of power electronic circuits using diodes, SCR, GTO, BJT, MOSFET, IGBT, rectifiers and switching circuits. Application in electronic power processing and control as applied to industrial drives, transportation systems and computer systems, Harmonics and power factor, power supplies with unity power factor. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as EEE 312L.Prerequisite: EEE 311. 3 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 0 credit).

EEE 321 Introduction to Communications Systems
Analysis and design of communication systems based on random variables, moments, and autocorrelation and power spectral density. Topics include analysis of noise, pulse shaping, bandpass signals, sampled signals, modulation and mixing. Applications include analysis of bit error rate, error probability of coded systems, and blocking probability properties and the impact of these properties on communication system design.Overview of current communication systems such as Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) and cellular communication system; Switching functions and Traffic analysis. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as EEE 321L. Prerequisite: EEE 221, MAT 361. 3 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 0 credit).

EEE 342 Control Engineering
Feedback control, transfer function modeling, time domain specifications, location of poles and stability, steady state performance, frequency response- Bode, Nyquist, and Nichols plots, gain and phase margin, resonant frequency, root locus, feedback compensation, introduction to digital control. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as EEE 342L.   Prerequisite:  EEE 221, MAT125. 4 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 1 credit).

EEE 361 Electromagnetic Fields & Waves
Maxwell's equations and their application to engineering problems. Topics include Electrostatics, steady electric currents, magnetostatics (through materials, inductances, forces, and energy), time-varying fields, waves and propagation, transmission lines, waveguides. Prerequisite: PHY 108, MAT 350. 3 Credits

EEE 362 Power Systems
Classification of transmission and distribution voltage levels, transmission line, sag, lightning, corona and reduction, transmission line resistance, calculation of inductance and capacitance, equivalent ckt of short and long line, power, voltage and power factor control, insulated cables, distribution systems, layout of substation, intro to harmonic generating devices, THD, harmonic reduction, high voltage DC transmission. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as EEE 362L. Prerequisite: EEE 363. 3 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 0 credit).

 

EEE 363 Electrical Machines
Working principles and applications of various DC and AC machines such as Dc generator/motor, Alternator, Synchronous motor, Induction motor and transformer, Armature winding diagram, Torque-Speed characteristics, power flow diagram, Parallel operation of generator, House diagram, Controlling motor characteristics. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as EEE 363L Prerequisite: EEE 241, EEE 361. 4 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 1 credit).

EEE 401 Professional Communication
This course introduces students to various kinds of technical and professional writing and communication skills. Engineering project proposal writing, presenting study or research report, tender and quotation; official letter, e-mail and memo; public speech and presentation skill; business communications: customer handling, complaint handling, fundamentals of marketing skill; fundamentals of human resources management at workplace, motivation and problem solving at work, dispute resolution and local/international negotiations. 3 Credits (cross listed with CEE 401)

EEE 495 Special Topics
Students can work for a Semester on an advanced topic in the area of Electronics or Telecommunication under the guidance of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Consent from the department chair and the concerned faculty. 3 Credits

EEE 498 Internship/Co-op/Directed Research
This course is designed to provide experience to students through internship/Co-op works in the public and private industry related to Electrical, Electronics, Telecommunication, and Computing Technology or through advanced research in relevant academic fields. Students will work there, prepare detailed report and present in front of a departmental committee. Prerequisite: Minimum 80 credits completed. Non-credit

EEE 499A and EEE 499B: Senior Design I & II
This is a senior level course, after a student has completed the core EEE, core Math, and core Science courses. This "capstone design course" involves multidisciplinary teams of students who build and test custom designed systems, components or engineering processes. Design projects selected from problems submitted by the students, faculty and local industry; Industry projects are given preference as they are best suited for meeting the course objectives; Instructional phase includes (not limited to): communications, report writing, visual aids, design process (requirements/specifications/objections, synthesis/analysis, design evaluation, implementation, maintainability, manufacturability, economic and social influences etc.), proposal preparation, estimating, project management and scheduling, contracts etc.; Performance phase includes (not limited to): design team formation and organization,  design proposals, implementation of design process, project scheduling and management, design reviews, design simulation and testing, preparation of documentation, drawings, specifications, etc., written and oral presentation of completed projects.  Prerequisite: EEE 499A - 100 credits completed including all EEE core courses. EEE 499B - the prerequisite is EEE 499A. 3 Credits (EEE 499A 1.5 cr. + EEE 499B 1.5 cr.)

Bachelor of Science in Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering (BSETE)

Program Educational Objectives

The BSETE curricula are designed to provide the fundamental principles of engineering and science, and the broad based general education essentials to the continued professional growth of the typical graduate.  The general objective of the BSETE degree program is to prepare graduates to become successful in their chosen career paths. Specifically, the graduates of the program will be able to:

PE1- Expertise: Excel as professionals in electronics and telecommunication engineering by building upon the problem-solving skills and knowledge, teamwork abilities, and communication skills acquired through the program.
PE2- Enhancement: Participate in lifelong-learning activities that enhance their professional and personal development through continuing studies, including graduate studies, professional trainings, and licensure.
PE3- Engagement: Demonstrate globally aware social justice, ethical and leadership role and responsibilities through personal and professional contributions to society.

Curriculum:

The BS in Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering degree program requires a minimum of 130 credits in about 4 years (12 Semesters) to complete. 

The breakdown of the total 130 semester credit hours is given as follows:

Category

Credits

University General Education

34

School of Engineering & Physical Sciences (SEPS) Core

38

ETE Major Core

42

ETE Major Capstone Design Project

4

ETE Major Electives

9

Open Electives

3

Intern/Co-op /Directed Research

Non-credit

Total Credit

130  Credits

  • University wide General Education Courses    (34 credits)

 

  • Languages                                                                                      (12 credits)

ENG 102 Introduction to Composition                                                  3
ENG 103 Intermediate Composition                                                      3
ENG 111 Public Speaking /                                                                    3
CEE401/EEE 401 Professional Communication                                   
ENG 115 Literature                                                                                3

  • Humanities                                                                                 (9 credits)

PHI 104 Introduction to Ethics                                                                          3
HIS 101 Bangladesh Culture and Heritage                                            3
HIS 102 Introduction to World Civilizations /                                       3
HIS 203 Islamic History

  • Social Sciences                                                                            (9 credits)

POL 101 Introduction to Political Science / POL 104 Governance       3
ECO 101 Micro Economics / ECO 104 Macro Economics                    3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology / ENV 203 Geography /                3
GEO 205 Bangladesh Geography / ANT 101 Anthropology    

  • Computer and Math Skills                                                                   -          

CSE 115 Programming Language I (With Lab) *                                   4
MAT 125 Linear Algebra*                                                                      3
MAT 361 Introduction to Probability & Statistics*                               3
MAT 116 Pre-calculus*                                                                           0

  • Sciences (with lab)                                                                       (4 credits)

CHE 101 Chemistry I*                                                                           4
PHY 107 Physics I*                                                                                4
BIO 103 Biology I / ENV 107 Introductions to Environmental            4
Science / PSY 101 Introductions to Psychology / 
PBH 101 Introduction to Public Health                                                 

  • School of Engineering and Physical Sciences Core                              (38 credits)

 

CSE 115 Programming Language I (With Lab) **                                 4
CHE 101 Chemistry I (With Lab) **                                                      4
MAT 116 Pre-calculus**                                                                         0
MAT 120 Calculus I                                                                                3
MAT 125 Linear Algebra**                                                                    3
MAT 130 Calculus II                                                                              3
MAT 250 Calculus III                                                                             3
MAT 350 Engineering Mathematics                                                       3
MAT 361 Introduction to Probability & Statistics **                            3         
PHY 107 Physics I (With Lab)**                                                           4
PHY 108 Physics II (With Lab)                                                              4
EEE 452 Engineering Economics                                                           3
CEE 112 Computer Aided Drawing for Engineers                                1

* In School of Engineering and Physical Sciences core       
** Counts toward General Education

ETE Core Courses

             (42 Credits)

 

 

 

 

ETE 141   Electrical Circuits I

3

ETE 141L Electrical Circuits I Lab

1

ETE 111    Analog Electronics I

3

ETE 111L Analog Electronics I Lab

1

ETE 211    Digital Logic design

3

ETE 211L Digital logic design Lab

0

ETE 241    Electrical Circuits II

3

ETE 241L Electrical Circuits II Lab

1

ETE 221    Signals and Systems

3

ETE 311    Analog Electronics II

3

ETE 311L Analog Electronics II Lab

1

ETE 361     Electromagnetic Fields & Waves

3

ETE 321     Intro to Communications Systems

3

ETE 321L   Intro to Communications Systems Lab

0

ETE 331     Data Communications &  Networks

3

ETE 331L Data Communications &  Networks Lab

0

ETE 424     Mobile and Wireless Communication System

3

ETE 424L Mobile and Wireless Communication Sys. Lab

1

ETE 426    Fiber optic Communication Systems

3

ETE 426L Fiber optic Communication System Lab

1

ETE 471     Digital Signal Processing

3

ETE 471L   Digital Signal Processing Lab

0

ETE Major Capstone Design 

 (4 Credits)

 

ETE 299   Junior Design  

      1

 

ETE 499A Senior Design  I

  1.5

 

ETE 499B Senior Design  II

  1.5

 

 

Internship/Co-op      
ETE 498 Internship/Co-op/ Directed Research                                                  Non-credit

ETE Specialized Elective Courses                                                           (9 Credits)

The specialized elective courses will ensure students’ depth understanding in a particular area of interest. Students must take a minimum of three courses (minimum 9 credits) to fulfil the requirements of Specialized Courses. The courses will be selected and offered from the list of approved elective courses. A maximum of six courses may be offered per year, among which three can be taken. One option is there as Special Topics, where an elective course equivalent to 3 credit hours may be offered depending on student demand and availability of specialized faculty..

 

Open Elective Course                                                                                   (3 Credits)
There is a 3 credit open elective, which a student may choose to take from any discipline. However, similar courses already taken in the core or other categories will not be counted.

Course Descriptions

ETE 111 Analog Electronics I
In this course, a variety of electronic devices used in the design of analog electronics are studied. Basic understanding of semiconductor devices is covered. Emphasis is placed on diodes, BJT, and FET. Small and large signal characteristics and models of electronic devices, analysis and design of elementary electronic circuits are also included. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as ETE 111L. Prerequisite: ETE 141. 4 Credits  (Theory 3 + Lab 1 credit).

ETE 141 Electrical Circuits I
The primary goal of this course is to introduce the basics of DC Electrical Circuits. The concepts of current, voltage, power, and energy are studied. Topics include DC sources, resistance, capacitance, inductance, and magnetism. Resistive circuits are analysed using Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s Laws. Circuits are also solved using superposition, Thevenin, Norton, nodal, and mesh analyses. Computer-aided analysis techniques using PSPICE are also introduced. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as ETE 141L. Prerequisite: None. 4 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 1 credit)

ETE 211 Digital Logic Design
This course provides an introduction to logic design and basic tools for the design of digital logic systems. A basic idea of number systems will be provided, followed by a discussion on combinational logic: logic gates, Boolean algebra, minimization techniques, arithmetic circuits (adders, subtractors), basic digital circuits (decoders, encoders, multiplexers, shift registers), programmable logic devices (PROM, PAL, PLA). The course will then cover sequential circuits: flip-flops, state transition tables and diagrams, state minimization, state machines, design of synchronous/asynchronous counters, RAM/ROM design. An introduction to programmable logic will also be provided. Hands-on experience will be provided through project on design of a logic system. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as ETE 211L. Prerequisite: ETE 111. 3 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 0 credit).

ETE 221 Signals and Systems
Analysis techniques for signals and systems. Signal representation, including Fourier and LaPlace transforms. System definitions and properties, such as linearity, causality, time invariance, and stability. Use of convolution, transfer functions and frequency response to determine system response.Applications to circuit analysis. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as ETE 221L. Prerequisite: MAT 350, CSE115L. 3 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 0 credit).

ETE 241 Electrical Circuits II
Sinusoids and Phasors, DC circuit Laws in AC circuits, Impedance combinations, Nodal and Mesh Analysis, Circuit theorems, AC Power concepts and Applications, Power Factor Correction, Three Phase Circuits, Power in Three Phase Circuits, Mutual Inductance, Transformers, Use of MATLAB and PSpice for AC Circuit Analysis. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as ETE 241L. Prerequisite: ETE 141. 4 Credits  (Theory 3 + Lab 1 credit).

ETE 299  Junior Design Project I
Introductory design course to introduce the basics steps of design project implementation. It will be a multidisciplinary teamwork. Each team has to develop a design project, submit a written report and oral presentation of completed projects. Instructional phase includes (not limited to): communications, technical report writing, visual aids, design process etc. Prerequisite: Min 60 credits completed including ETE 211, ETE 311, ENG 111, PHI 104, PHY 108, MAT 350. 1 Credit

ETE 311 Analog Electronics II
Design methods to fix gain and bandwidth specifications in amplifiers are presented. Design use of feedback technique is presented. Properties and design amplification of operational amplifiers are studied. Emphasis is given on electronic circuitry used in communication engineering. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as ETE 311L. Prerequisite: ETE 111. 4 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 1 credit)

ETE 321 Introduction to Communications Systems
Analysis and design of communication systems based on random variables, moments, and autocorrelation and power spectral density. Topics include analysis of noise, pulse shaping, bandpass signals, sampled signals, modulation and mixing. Applications include analysis of bit error rate, error probability of coded systems, and blocking probability properties and the impact of these properties on communication system design. Overview of current communication systems such as Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) and cellular communication system; Switching functions and Traffic analysis. This course has separate mandatory laboratory sessions every week as EEE 321L. Prerequisite: EEE 221, MAT 361. 3 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 0 credit).

ETE 331 Data Communications & Networks
The objective of this course is to learn fundamentals of networking concepts, their implementations and applications in today’s globally connected world. Computer network is a rapidly changing field, where new technologies and standards are appearing everyday. This makes the field challenging. Therefore, without firm understating of the core principles it can be difficult for the newcomers to understand and implement new technologies. This course is a standard introduction to the computer networking with special focus on TCP/IP protocol stack. We have used layered approach to understand different components of computer networks. The requirements for mathematical background has been kept minimum to make the course more accessible to the undergraduate students. Only elementary knowledge of probability and queuing theory is need to understand most stuffs. We will devote significant part of our time to understand core networking principles and their relationships to the TCP/IP protocol stacks. Some aspects on network programming methodologies (socket programming) and network diagnostics (using Wireshark tools) will also be studied. Prerequisite: ETE 221. 3 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 0 credit).

 

ETE 361 Electromagnetic Fields & Waves
Maxwell's equations and their application to engineering problems. Topics include Electrostatics, steady electric currents, magnetostatics (through materials, inductances, forces, and energy), time-varying fields, waves and propagation, transmission lines, waveguides. Prerequisite: PHY 108, MAT 350. 3 Credits

ETE 424 Mobile and Wireless Communication System
Fundamental theory and design of high capacity wireless communications systems. This course will discuss cellular systems, standards, protocols as well as high-speed wireless data communication systems. Topics include trunking, propagation, frequency reuse, modulation, source coding, error correction coding, multiple access schemes and equalization. Prerequisite: ETE 321. 4 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 1 credit)

ETE 426 Fiber Optic Communication Systems
Theory of optical fiber waveguide propagation and design applications in communication and sensing systems. Opto-electronic transmission and switching system, Transceivers, WDM and DWDM systems, SDH systems, FDDI, Broadband communication system, Submarine Cable Networks, fiber to the home and curb. Prerequisite: ETE 361. 4 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 1 credit)

ETE 471 Digital Signal Processing
Continuous- and discrete-time system theory. Block diagrams, feedback, and stability theory. Discrete-time stability, difference equations, Z-transforms, transfer functions, Fourier transforms, and frequency response. Analysis, design, and realization of digital filters. Discrete Fourier Transform algorithms, digital filter design procedures, coefficient quantization, finite word length arithmetic, fixed point implementation, limit cycles, noise shaping, decimation and interpolation. This course has mandatory laboratory sessions every week.  Prerequisite: ETE 221.  3 Credits (Theory 3 + Lab 0 credit)

ETE 493 Special Topics
Students can work for a Semester on an advanced topic in the area of Electronics or Telecommunication under the guidance of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Consent from the department chair and the concerned faculty. 3 Credits

ETE 499A and ETE 499B: Senior Design I & II
This is a senior level course, after a student has completed the core ETE, core Math, and core Science courses. This "capstone design course" involves multidisciplinary teams of students who build and test custom designed systems, components or engineering processes. Design projects selected from problems submitted by the students, faculty and local industry; Industry projects are given preference as they are best suited for meeting the course objectives; Instructional phase includes (not limited to): communications, report writing, visual aids, design process (requirements/specifications/objections, synthesis/analysis, design evaluation, implementation, maintainability, manufacturability, economic and social influences etc.), proposal preparation, estimating, project management and scheduling, contracts etc.; Performance phase includes (not limited to): design team formation and organization,  design proposals, implementation of design process, project scheduling and management, design reviews, design simulation and testing, preparation of documentation, drawings, specifications, etc., written and oral presentation of completed projects.  Prerequisite: ETE 499A - 100 credits completed including all ETE core courses. ETE 499B - the prerequisite is ETE 499A 3 Credits (ETE 499A 1.5 cr. + ETE 499B 1.5 cr.)

ETE 498 Internship /Co-op/ Directed Research
This course is designed to provide experience to students through internship/Co-op works in the public and private industry related to Electrical, Electronics, Telecommunication, and Computing Technology or through advanced research in relevant academic fields. Students will work there, prepare detailed report and present in front of a departmental committee. Prerequisite: Minimum 80 credits completed. Non-credit

Graduate Degree Programs

Master of Science in Computer Science & Engineering (MS CSE)

The overall objective of Computer Science & Engineering (CSE) education is to develop human resources with the capability of solving problems related to the growth of the society with the help of computing technology. Over the years, North South University (NSU) has developed an internationally competitive undergraduate Computer Science & Engineering program, modelled after similar programs offered by leading North American Universities. Graduates of this program have demonstrated excellence in industry and graduate studies both at home and abroad.
Leveraging the success of undergraduate program, NSU envisions developing the graduate program with the focus on research and technopreneurship. The CSE graduate program has been designed with the objective of creating and deploying new computing knowledge for enhancing the quality of life of citizens of Bangladesh and the rest of the world. In the process of developing this program, NSU’s CSE department performed extensive investigation of the research report on computer science education produced by Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers’ (IEEE) Computer Society, reviewed similar graduate programs of leading North American Universities, studied the structure and dynamics of local and global IT industry and consulted with notable academicians and entrepreneurs in the area of Computer Science and Engineering.
North South University understands that it would be a formidable challenge for developing a world class CSE graduate program in Bangladesh. Over the years, NSU has invested significantly in developing the knowledge infrastructure comprising state-of-the-art library, computer laboratories and esteemed faculty members with international reputation. This basic infrastructure will work as strong foundation for the growth of this new graduate program to the standard of similar programs offered by leading North American Universities.
This graduate program is designed with the research focus on distributed multimedia computing, robotics and intelligent machines, software engineering, computer networking, algorithms and system complexity, computer graphics and visualization, and computer architecture, telecommunications and bioinformatics. A balanced approach has been taken in course and thesis works in order to develop both the breadth and depth of knowledge in graduating students.

Admission Requirements

 

General requirements for admission to the Masters in Computer Science program:

  1. a) A 4-year bachelor's or equivalent degree in Computer Science/Computer Engineering/Computer Science and Engineering/Information Technology or any computer related areas from an accredited public or private university in Bangladesh or abroad with a grade point average of at least 3.0 (in the 4.0 scale). Students having a CGPA of less than 3.0 may be considered if the GRE Computer Science subject test score is submitted.
  2. A 3-year bachelor's or equivalent degree in Computer Science/Computer Engineering/Computer Science and Engineering/Information Technology or any computer related areas from an accredited public or private university in Bangladesh or abroad with a grade point average of at least 3.0 (in the 4.0 scale) may be admitted on condition that at least 15 credits of foundation courses from the undergraduate curriculum must be completed at NSU in order to be a regular student in the MS in Computer Science & Engineering program.

2.   Acceptable score in the NSU Administered Admission Test or a score of 1100 in the Quantitative and Verbal part of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test.

  1. Three letters of recommendation, at least two must be from the faculty members of the last institution attended.

Degree Requirements

The general requirements for the Masters’ in Computer Science & Engineering degree are as follows:
Students must choose one of the following options:

  1. A Thesis with 24 credits course work and passing of Qualifying Examinations in 3 areas
  2. A Project with 27 credits course work and passing of Qualifying Examinations in 4 areas
  3. Only 30 credits course work and passing of Qualifying Examinations in 5 areas

The minimum and maximum time to complete the degree requirements are 3 semesters and 5 years respectively from the initial enrolment of the Masters’ program. The residency requirement is 21 credit hours including the Masters’ Thesis. A maximum of 9 credits are transferable from other universities.

“A student must complete required number of credits with minimum CGPA of 3.0 on a 4 point scale to earn the degree. To continue in the program a student must maintain a minimum CGPA of 3.0 at all levels of academic advancement. If in any semester the CGPA drops below 2.70 the student will be on academic probation. If a student remains on probation for two consecutive semesters, he/she will be dismissed from the program

 

Course Requirements:
To fulfill the degree requirement, students in the Computer Science & Engineering Masters’ program will have to take eight courses, covering at least four of the following six groups. Students completing two courses and a thesis in one of these groups will receive the degree with concentration in that area.
Group 1: Algorithms


Courses

Titles

CSE 511

Advanced Algorithms

CSE 541

Formal Language and Automata Theory

CSE 551

Graph Theory

CSE 561

Cryptography

Group 2: Computer Networks & Systems


Courses

Titles

CSE 512

Distributed Database Systems

CSE 522

Distributed Operating Systems

CSE 532

Advanced Computer Architecture

CSE 552

Advanced Computer Networks

Group 3: Intelligent System Engineering

Courses

Titles

CSE 513

Advanced Artificial Intelligence

CSE 523

Advanced Neural Networks

CSE 533

Machine Learning

CSE 553

Computer Vision

CSE 573
CSE 516

Theory of Fuzzy Systems
Bioinformatics Computing

 

Group 4: Software Engineering

Courses

Titles

CSE 524

Formal Methods in Software Engineering

CSE 534

Software Quality Assurance

CSE 544

Intellectual Property and Contract Law

 

Group 5: Telecommunication Engineering

Courses

Titles

CSE 515

Fiber-Optic Communications System II

CSE 525

Network Operations and Management

CSE 545

Mobile & Wireless Communication System

CSE 555

Telecommunications Business and Management

CSE 565

Digital Signal Processing

Special Courses

 

CSE 598: Special Topics
CSE 590: Project
CSE 599: Thesis

 

Qualifying Examination:
There will be a qualifying exam administered at the beginning of each semester in the following 10 areas:

1. Algorithm Analysis                                     2. Operating Systems
3. Compiler Construction                                4. Computer Network
5. Database Systems                                       6. Artificial Intelligence
7. Computer Architecture                               8. Software Engineering
9. Programming Languages Principles            10.Formal Languages and Automata Theory

All students are required to pass the qualifying examination in 4 areas within the 3 semesters of their enrolment. The students can sit for the examinations at most two times to pass in their chosen 4 areas. They will be allowed to sit in only for the required number of areas. (For example, a student needing to pass in 2 areas in his/her 2nd attempt may not appear in 3 or more areas). Failure to pass the qualifying examination will result in the discontinuation from the Masters program. To avoid being dismissed from the program students are strongly advised to take relevant undergraduate courses before making the 2nd attempt.

Thesis Committee:
After passing the qualifying examinations, a Thesis Committee will be formed for the student. The supervisor, in consultation with the Graduate Adviser, will form a four-member Thesis Committee that should include one external member.
Thesis Committee advises the student regarding the direction of the course works and suggests possible research areas. The Committee would evaluate the student’s progress time to time and may suggest a few presentations in a seminar prior to the final thesis defense. The Thesis supervisor determines whether to enroll CSE599 as a one-semester 6-credit course or a two-semester having 3-credits each.

Course Descriptions

Group 1: Algorithms

CSE 511 Advanced Algorithms

Principles underlying the design and analysis of efficient algorithms. Topics to be covered include: divide-and-conquer algorithms, graph algorithms, matroids and greedy algorithms, randomized algorithms, NP-completeness, approximation algorithms, linear programming. 3 Credits.

CSE 541 Formal Language and Automata Theory

This course will give an introduction to formal languages and automata theory. Automata and formal languages appear (possibly in various disguises) in almost every branch of computer science. A formal language is a set of strings where a string is a finite sequence of symbols. An example of a formal language is the set of all ``syntactically correct'' Pascal programs (accepted by a certain compiler). A main problem that will be discussed is how to define an infinite language in a finite way. A related problem is to construct an algorithm that can decide whether a string is in the language or not. Both problems are of practical importance, for instance for constructing compilers and design of programming languages. At the end of the course, students will be introduced to the theory of computability. 3 Credits.

CSE 551 Graph Theory

This course starts with the basics of graphs, digraphs, and networks. It covers spanning trees, connectivity, traversal, planarity, coloring, network flows, algebraic specification of networks, and layouts on surfaces. Drawings and concrete examples abound. Applications concentrate on graphs as models for computer science, operations research, and sociology, including special attention to software design and to parallel architectures. 3 Credits.

CSE 561 Cryptography

Origins, computer arithmetic and complexity- what is cryptography, a history of factoring and primality testing, computer arithmetic and complexity, Symmetric-key cryptosystems- an introduction to congruences, block ciphers, DES cryptanalysis, successor AES, stream ciphers, Public-key crypto-systems- exponentiation, discrete logs, public key cryptography, authentication, knapsacks, Primality Testing- an introduction to primitive roots, true primality tests, probabilistic primality tests, Agrawal algorithm, Factoring- three algorithms, the number field sieve, Advanced topics – elliptic curves and cryptography, zero knowledge, quantum cryptography. 3 Credits.

Group 2: Computer Networking & Systems

CSE 512 Distributed Database Systems

In this course, students will learn different distributed database management algorithms to support concurrency, transaction management, query optimization, replication, recovery, distributed database design and security; implement a client-server DBMS and distributed database applications. Distributed databases - various contemporary issues including data model partitioning, fragmentation, replication issues, query optimization, concurrency control, restart and recovery, distributed database design, client-server and distributed database applications will be discussed in details. Students will build a distributed system with Oracle DBMS. Particular attention will be paid to detailed consideration of distributed database management issues. 3 Credits.

CSE 522 Distributed Operating Systems

This course provides an in-depth examination of principles of distributed operating systems. Covered topics include processes and threads, concurrent programming, distributed interprocess communication, distributed process scheduling, shared virtual memory, distributed file systems. In-depth examples will be taken from current operating systems such as UNIX and MACH. Some coverage of operating system principles for multiprocessors will also be included. 3 Credits.

CSE 532 Advanced Computer Architecture

This course examines the structure of modern computer systems. We explore hardware and technology trends that have led to current machine organizations, then consider specific features and their impact on software and performance. These may include superscalar issue, caches, pipelines, branch prediction, and parallelism. Midterm and final exams, team project, homework, in-class exercises. 3 Credits.

CSE 552 Advanced Computer Networks

Computer Networks is a graduate course that introduces fundamental concepts in the design and implementation of computer communication networks and their protocols. Topics include: layered network architectures, applications, transport and routing, IP version 6, mobile IP, multicasting, session initiation protocol, quality of service, network security, network management, and TCP/IP in wireless networks. An emphasis will be placed on the protocols used in the Internet. 3 Credits.

Group 3: Intelligent System Engineering

CSE 513 Advanced Artificial Intelligence

In-depth introduction to Artificial Intelligence focusing on techniques that allow intelligent systems to operate in real-time and cope with missing information, uncertainty, and limited computational resources. Topics include: advanced search and problem-solving techniques, resource-bounded search, principles of knowledge representation and reasoning, meta-reasoning, reasoning under uncertainty, Bayesian networks and influence diagrams, decision theory and the value of information, planning and scheduling, intelligent agents architectures, and learning. 3 Credits.

CSE 523 Advanced Neural Networks

This is a research course tailored to the needs of the current students enrolled, there is no strictly set syllabus. Following is a list of the topics which will be covered in depth in this course: Extended ASOCS coverage, Hamming Networks, Learning by a critic and the Associate Search Network, Genetic Algorithms, Self Organizing Topological Feature Maps, Counterpropagation networks, BAM's (bidirectional associative memories), Boolean Networks, RCE's (Restricted Coloumb Energy Networks), Implementation of actual applications in neural networks. 3 Credits.

CSE 533 Machine Learning

This course covers a variety of methods that enable a machine to learn. We will cover as much of Duda, Hart, & Stork's ÔPattern RecognitionÕ as time permits. Topics will include Bayesian decision theory, maximum-likelihood estimation, expectation maximization, nearest-neighbor methods, linear discriminants, support vector machines, artificial neural networks, classification and regression trees, ensemble classifiers, clustering, and self-organizing feature maps. There will be weekly problem sets including some programming. There will be a midterm, and a final exam. 3 Credits.

CSE 553 Computer Vision

People are able to infer the characteristics of a scene or object from an image of it. In this course, we will study what is involved in building artificial systems which try to infer such characteristics from an image. Topics include: Basics of image formation - the effect of geometry, viewpoint, lighting and albedo on image formation. Basic image operations such as filtering, convolution and correlation. Frequency representations of images. The importance of scale in images. Measurements of image properties such as color, texture, appearance and shape. Inference of motion and structure from moving objects and images. Detecting and recognizing objects in images. 3 Credits.

CSE 573 Theory of Fuzzy Systems

Introduction to Neuro-Fuzzy and Soft Computing, Soft Computing and AI, Neural Networks, Fuzzy Set Theory, MF Formulation and Parameterization, Fuzzy Union, Intersection, and Complement, Fuzzy Rules and Fuzzy Reasoning, Fuzzy Inference Systems, Regression and Optimization, Supervised Learning Neural Networks, Neuro-Fuzzy Modeling, ANFIS, Neuro-Fuzzy Control, ANFIS Applications. 3 Credits.
CSE 516 Bioinformatics Computing
Retrieval and analysis of electronic information are essential in today's research environment. This course explores the theory and practice of biological database searching and analysis. In particular, students are introduced to integrated systems where a variety of data sources are connected through worldwide web access. Information retrieval as well as interpretation are discussed and many practical examples in a computer laboratory setting enable students to improve their data mining skills. Methods included in the course are searching the biomedical literature, sequence homology searching and multiple alignments, protein sequence motif analysis, and several genome analytical methods. 3 Credits.

Group 4: Software Engineering

CSE 524 Formal Methods in Software Engineering

This course introduces students to the principal activities involved in developing high-quality software systems. The course stresses the use of defined, systematic processes in the creation of carefully defined and engineered software products. Among the topics covered are requirements analysis, software architecture, formal specification methods, process definition, software design methods, and test planning. Issues specific to the development of software by teams and groups will also be addressed. Students will be required to read selected papers from the literature and complete homework projects. 3 Credits.

CSE 534 Software Quality Assurance

This course will survey current research in developing tools and techniques for assuring software quality. As computing technology continues to permeate every aspect of personal and public life, the need for assuring the reliability of our computing infrastructure is increasing steadily. Driven by these societal needs, software quality research has become very active in the last few years. This course will survey current work in this area. While research in software engineering is as old as programming, recent approaches have broken new ground and there is currently a great deal of ferment. Thus, this course will necessarily take in a broad selection of topics, including research in testing, monitoring of running systems, capturing and querying program traces, several variations on extending type systems and other static analyses, theorem proving systems, and software model checking. The syllabus will be entirely research papers. 3 Credits.

CSE 544 Intellectual Property and Contract Law

This course exposes students to issues of professional practice, ethical behaviour, and computer law. Topics included may be history of computing, impact of computer on the society, computing careers, legal and ethical responsibilities, intellectual property rights management, copyrights, patents law, trade secrets, software piracy, laws related to information security and ethical responsibilities of computing profession. 3 Credits.

Group 5: Telecommunication Engineering

CSE 515 Fiber-Optic Communications System II
Telecommunications: Point-to-Point Systems and Networks, Information Carrying Capacity, The Need for Fiber-Optic Communications Systems, A Fiber-Optic Communications System: The Basic Blocks, Worldwide Submarine Networks, Electromagnetic Spectrum, Radiation & Absorption, Optical Fibers-Basics: Step-Index Fiber, Numerical Aperture, Attenuation, Calculation of Total Attenuation, Intermodal and Chromatic Dispersion, Graded-Index Fiber, The Structure of a Singlemode Fiber, Bit Rate and Bandwidth, Cutoff Wavelength, V-Number, Attenuation Constant, Dispersion in Multimode Fibers, Electrical & Optical Bandwidth, Spectral Width, Singlemode Fibers, Gaussian Beam, Bit Rate of a Singlemode Fiber, Fabrication, Cabling, and Installation, Fiber Cable Connectorization and Testing, Power Budget, Light Sources, Transmitters and Receivers; Transmitter Modules, Receiver Units, Components of Fiber-Optic Networks; Passive Components, Switches, Transceivers, TDM,  WDM and DWDM systems, Add/Drop Problem, Multiplexing Hierarchy in Telecommunications, SONET & SDH Systems, FDDI, and Functional Modules of Fiber-Optic Networks-Telephone and Computer Networks, Networks, Protocols, and Services, OSI, ATM Networks and Layers; Broadband Communication System, Network Management and Future of Fiber-Optic Networks. 3 Credits.
CSE 525 Network Operations and Management

Microcomputer principles and Applications. Fundamental characteristics of the software life cycle. Tools. techniques and management controls for development and maintenance of large software systems. Software metrics and models. Human factors and experimental design. 3 Credits.

CSE 545 Mobile & Wireless Communication System

Aspects of radiowave propagation for fixed and mobile communication systems, and cellular system design. Large-scale and small-scale propagation models, multipath fading, link-budget, interference and frequency reuse, multiple access schemes and system capacity. Trunking and grade of service, wireless network planning and operation. Architecture and operation of 2G cellular mobile systems, 2.5 G and 3G technologies. Special techniques/Diversity, Equalization, Interleaving, and Smart Antenna. 3 Credits.

CSE 555 Telecommunications Business and Management
 

Telecom services, local, long distance, mobile telephony, voice over IP, business models, operations and maintenance, cost and pricing for service packages, wireless vs wireline telephony, industry dynamics, market competition, regulatory issues, cost of compliance, ITU and telecom policy for local nd global market, industry restructure, privitazation trends in developing markets, spectrum management, licensing and fees, tariff, interconnection, overseas access, business models. 3 Credits.

CSE 565 Digital Signal Processing

The purpose of this course is to give the students of Computer Science/Engineering the basic background in Digital Signal Processing. This course introduces how a computer (a general purpose or special purpose DSP chip) could be used to solve Signal Processing problems digitally. The topics include introduction to discrete signal and systems, difference equations, discrete convolution, Z-transform and Fast Fourier transform techniques. 3 Credits.

CSC 598 Special Topics

A course on any contemporary topic in the field of Computer Science & Engineering. 3 Credits.

CSC 599 Thesis

The thesis work will make original research contribution in the concentration research topics. It is expected to make the original that the thesis work will produce a reputable international journal. 6 Credits.

Master of Science in Electrical and Electronic Engineering (MS EEE)

The Master of Science in Electrical and Electronic Engineering (MS EEE) program at NSU is designed to train the students to become competent and efficient engineers in the area of communication, Electronics, Control, System, Powers and other Electrical Engineering related fields as well as to provide support for industrial research needs. The graduates will be able to plan, analyze, design, implement, operate, test, maintain and manage the Electrical and Electronics systems and business. The program is highly recommended for the students who wish to purse highest level of academic carrier with the focus of research in the Electrical and Electronics Engineering. The program is also easily accessible to engineering professionals who wish to pursue advanced studies in Electrical Engineering in order to obtain technical as well as engineering management positions in the industry.

Admission Requirements
General requirements for admission to the MS EEE program:

  • The students who have completed B.S. in EE/EEE/ETE/ECE are eligible to apply for admission in EEE Master Program.
  • The students who do not hold a B.S. degree in EE/EEE/ETE/ECE but obtained B.S. degree in other engineering program/Applied Physics may enroll in the MS in Electrical Engineering Program provided that they complete the remedial courses required by the Department.  The students will be required to pass Signals and Systems. In addition, they must demonstrate proficiency in three of the five following areas of specialization by successfully completing or challenging the corresponding courses: Electromagnetic, basic course on communication, electronics, control systems and electrical machines or energy conversion. In some cases, the EEE Graduate Admission Committee may require additional remedial classes. The list of remedial courses are as follows:

EEE 111 Analog Electronics I
EEE 141 Electric Circuit I
EEE 221 Signals and Systems
EEE 241 Electric Circuit II
EEE 311 Analog Electronics II
EEE 313 Semiconductor Devices and Technology
EEE 312 Power Electronics
EEE 321 Introduction to Communication Systems
EEE 342 Control Engineering
EEE 361 Electromagnetic Fields
EEE 362 Electrical Transmission and Distribution Systems
EEE 363 Electrical Machines

  • The minimum grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.75 (in a 4.0 scale) or minimum of 2nd-class in BSc-Hons/M.Sc.
  • Acceptable score in the NSU admission Test or a score of 1100 in the Quantitative and Verbal part of GRE General Test (old system) or equivalent in new GRE system
  •  Three letters of recommendation

 

Degree Requirements

 

The ECE master’s program at NSU offers both a thesis option and a non-thesis option for the Master of Science (MS) degree in the Electrical and Electronics Engineering (EEE) major.

  • The total credit hours required to complete the MS-EEE degree are 33 credit hours minimum beyond the Bachelor’s Degree, which includes a thesis work.
  • The total credit hours required to complete the MS-ENG degree are 36 credit hours minimum beyond the Bachelor’s Degree, which does not require a thesis work.

 

However, these options are available only for the students who can enroll as Regular Graduate Student Status at EEE.  A student with a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in EE/EEE/ETE/ECE from an accredited university may be admitted as a Regular Graduate Student status in the MS-EEE program. This status allows the student full participation in the MS-EEE program. 

Conditional Graduate Student Status:

Students who do not hold a B.S. degree in EE/EEE/ETE/ECE may be admitted as Conditional Graduate Student Status in MS EEE program. However, students with conditional status must petition for the admission to the Regular Graduate Status after completing the remedial courses. The students will be required to pass Signals and Systems. In addition, they must demonstrate proficiency in three of the five following areas of specialization by successfully completing or challenging the corresponding courses: Electromagnetic, basic course on communication, electronics, control systems and electrical machines or energy conversion. In some cases, the EEE Graduate Admission Committee may require additional remedial classes.

Remedial course list (for conditional students whose B.S. is not in EE/EEE/ETE/ECE)

EEE 111 Analog Electronics I
EEE141 Electric Circuit I
EEE 221 Signals and Systems
EEE 241 Electric Circuit II
EEE 311 Analog Electronics II
EEE 313 Semiconductor Devices and Technology
EEE 312 Power Electronics
EEE 321 Introduction to Communication Systems
EEE 342 Control Engineering
EEE 361 Electromagnetic Fields
EEE 362 Electrical Transmission and Distribution Systems
EEE 363 Electrical Machines

a. Thesis Option:

The MS-EEE thesis option requires minimum of 33 credit hours that includes 21 credit hours of formal coursework and 12 credit hours of thesis.  All MS thesis program students must complete a written thesis. Upon completion of the thesis, an oral defense is required, which consists of a public presentation of the student's work to the department and the student's supervisory committee. The Supervisory Committee for MS degree thesis program consists of the student's thesis supervisor and a minimum of three (3) graduate faculty members selected by the ECE Graduate Program Committee.

Following are the specific requirements must be met for MS EEE thesis option:

  • Coursework: Minimum 21 credit hours of graduate-level of coursework (500 and 600 level) satisfying the following:
    • Minimum five (5) graduate courses (15 Credit hours) must be from three (3) different Technical Interest Areas (TIAs)
    • Minimum two (2) graduate courses (6 credit hours) from any of the listed TIAs (possibly used to increase student's depth/breadth in a particular area of interest)
  • Graduate Thesis:  12 credit hours of MS Thesis - EEE 600
  • Oral Thesis Defense: Oral defense consists of a public presentation of the student's work to the department and the supervisory committee. A submission of thesis written report must be submitted to the Chairman of the Supervisory committee at least two weeks prior to the actual presentation date.

 

b. Non-thesis option:

The MS-ENG (non-thesis option) requires minimum of 36 credit hours that includes 30 credit hours of TIA coursework and 6 credit hours from special topic and project courses.

Following are the specific requirements for MS-ENG (non-thesis option):

  • Coursework: At least 30 credit hours of graduate-level coursework (500 and 600 level) satisfying the following:
    • Minimum six (6) graduate courses (18 Credit hours) must be from three (3) different Technical Interest Areas (TIAs), with minimum of two courses (6 Credit Hours) from each of these three TIAs.
    • Minimum four (4) graduate courses (12 credit hours) from any of the listed TIAs (possibly used to increase student's depth/breadth in a particular area of interest)
  • Special Topics / Project course:  Minimum two (6 credit hours ) courses among the following three courses:

 

            EEE 596: Special Topics I (Advances in Electrical Engineering I)
EEE 597: Special Topics II (Advances in Electrical Engineering II)
EEE 598: Graduate Project
Guidelines of these special courses are available through the Chairman of ECE Curriculum Committee
c. General Rule:
The students must secure a GPA of 3.0 for the award of the MS-EEE & MS-ENG degree both in thesis and non-thesis options. A student must complete required number of credits with minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4 point scale to earn the degree. To continue in the program a student must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 at all levels of academic advancement. If in any semester the GPA drops below 2.70 the student will be on academic probation. If a student remains on probation for two consecutive semesters, he/she will be dismissed from the program.

Course Listing:

Remedial Courses only for conditional students- [3 Credit Hours each]
EEE 111 Analog Electronics
EEE 141 Electric Circuit I
EEE 221 Signals and Systems
EEE 241 Electric Circuit II
EEE 313 Semiconductor Devices and Technology
EEE 312 Power Electronics
EEE 321 Introduction to Communication Systems
EEE 361 Electromagnetic Fields
EEE 362 Electrical Transmission and Distribution Systems
EEE 363 Electrical Machines

Special Topics / Project / Thesis:
For Thesis option:      
EEE 600: Graduate Thesis - 12 Credit Hours

For Non-thesis option:  (choose any two course)
EEE 596: Special Topics (Advances in Electrical Engineering I) - 3 Credit Hours
EEE 597: Special Topics (Advances in Electrical Engineering II) - 3 Credit Hours
EEE 598: Graduate Project - 3 Credit Hours

Elective Coursework under Technical Interest Areas:

Currently, the Electrical and Electronic Engineering Program supports Four (4) Technical Interest Areas (TIAs) as listed below:

  • Electronics, Signals, and Control
  • Communications, Electro-magnetics and Optics
  • Power
  • VLSI and Computer

 

Courses of these Technical Interest Areas (TIAs) are listed below [3 credit hours each]

  • Electronics, Signals, and Control

EEE 512 Solid State Electronics
EEE 513 Nanotechnology     
EEE 520 Stochastic Signals and Systems
EEE 523 Nonlinear Systems - Analysis, Stability and Control
EEE 526 Advance Digital Signal Processing and Filter Design  
EEE 586 Special Topics

  • Communications, Electro-Magnetics and Optics

EEE 533 Digital Communications
EEE 534 Mobile and wireless Communications  
EEE 535 Satellite Communications
EEE 540 RF & Microwave Engineering and Applications 
EEE 543 Advanced Fiber Optics and Applications 
EEE 546 Network Architecture and Protocols
EEE 587 Special Topics

  • Power

EEE 550 Power System Operation and Control and planning
EEE 552 Smart Energy Systems
EEE 554 Advanced Power Conversion Techniques
EEE 555 Power System Modeling and Control 
EEE 556 Smart Grid Design and Operation
EEE 588 Special Topics

  • VLSI and Computer

 EEE 560 Advanced Computer Architecture   
EEE 563 Systems on a Chip Design
EEE 568 Advanced VLSI Design
EEE 660 Computer Vision Systems 
EEE 661 Network and Computer Security 
EEE 589 Special Topics

 

Course Descriptions

EEE 512 Solid State Electronics
 
Solid state electronics concepts including semiconductor device physics, microelectronic fabrication, and SPICE modeling. Topics include quantum well structures, semiconductor physics, pn junctions, bipolar and field effect transistors, photolithography, oxidation, diffusion, and computer simulation of semiconductor devices. 3 Credits  

EEE 513 Nanotechnology
 
The course will focus on the core aspects of the physical sciences which are relevant to nanotechnology. The aim of the course is a full understanding of how the dimensions of a nanoscale device impact upon its electronic, optical, magnetic, structural and chemical properties. The course will therefore provide an introduction to key elements of quantum and statistical physics, solid state physics, semiconductor devices, maganetism and superconductivity, basic atomic and molecular physics. 3 Credits

EEE 520 Stochastic Signals and Systems

Engineering applications of probability theory, random variables and random processes, topics include: Gaussian and non-Gaussian random variables, correlation and stationary of random processes, time and frequency response of linear systems to random inputs using both classical transform and modern state space techniques. 3 Credits

EEE 523 Nonlinear Systems - Analysis, Stability and Control
 
Introduction to the theory of systems of coupled, nonlinear, time-varying ordinary differential equations: existence and uniqueness of solutions; continuous dependence on parameters; stability of equilibria and stability analysis techniques; input-to-state stability; input-output stability; nonlinear control design techniques including input-state and input-output feedback linearization, back stepping, and sliding mode control. 3 Credits

EEE 526 Advance Digital Signal Processing and Filter Design
Discrete time signals and systems: Fourier and Z transform, DFT, 2-dimensional versions. Digital signal processing topics: flow graphs, realizations, FFT, chirp-Z algorithms, Hilbert transform relations, quantization effects, and linear prediction. Digital filter design methods: windowing, frequency sampling, S-to-Z methods, frequency-transformation methods, optimization methods, 2-dimensional filter design. 3 Credits

EEE 533 Digital Communications 
Digital modulation and reception, Topics: unifying signal space representation of digital modulation schemes, optimum digital communication symbol detectors, detector performance evaluation, optimum and adaptive equalizers for channel distortion mitigation, maximum likelihood sequence estimators (MLSE's), the Viterbi algorithm MLSE implementation, and spread sprectrum and other modulation schemes. Computer assignements provide experience with symbol detection adaptive channel equalization and the Viterbi algorithm applied to several realistic channel models and modulation schemes. 3 Credits

EEE 534 Mobile and Wireless Communications
Fundamental theory and design of high capacity wireless communications systems. This course will discuss cellular systems as well as high-speed wireless data communication systems. Topics include trunking, propagation, frequency reuse, modulation, source coding, error correction coding, multiple access schemes and equalization. 3 Credits

EEE 535 Satellite Communications
Introduction to Satellite Communications; Orbital Aspects of Earth Satellites (Introduction Kepler’s first, second & third law, orbits, geostationary orbits); Satellite Link Design; Propagation on Satellite-Earth Paths and Its Influence on Link Design; Modulation, Multiplexing and Multiple Access Techniques in Satellite Communications; Satellite Networking ; Spacecraft and Earth Station Technology; Types of Satellite Networks; Performance and Reliability of Satellite Communications. 3 Credits

EEE 540 RF & Microwave Engineering and Applications
Passive and active RF and microwave components and circuits for wireless communications, transmission-line theory; planar transmission-lines and waveguides; S-parameters; resonators; power dividers and couplers; microwave filters; sources, detectors, and active devices; modern RF & microwave CAD. Active RF components. Microwave amplifier design. Microwave Integrated Circuits (MIC), RF Micro-electromechanical System (MEMS) components, Microwave systems, RF components for wireless systems. RF components for Ultra Wideband (UWB) systems. 3 Credits

EEE 543 Advanced Fiber Optics and Applications
Theory of optical fiber waveguide materials, propagation, modal analysis, chromatic and polarization mode dispersions, fundamental properties of semiconductor light sources including laser diode and light-emitting diode (LED), principles of operation and noise mechanisms of photodetectors, including p-i-n and avalanche photodiodes,  design and analyzing basic fiber components, devices  and building blocks in the development and operation of optical fiber systems and applications in transmission, communication and sensing systems. 3 Credits

EEE 546 Network Architecture and Protocols
Principles and concepts of networking and protocols, with emphasis on data link, network, and transport protocols. Contemporary and emerging networks and protocols to illustrate concepts and to provide insight into practical networks including the Internet. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons of network architectures and protocols. 3 Credits

EEE 550 Power System Operations, Control and Planning
Design of SCR commutation circuits. Base and gate drive circuits of static switching devices. snubber circuits, switching losses and heat sink. Input/output filter design of static power converters.  Design of protection circuits or static power converters. Scalar and vector control of AC machines using static power converters. Design of DC machine control using static power converters. Design of microcomputer controllers for static power converter switching. 3 Credits

EEE 552 Smart Energy Systems
The modern electric power infrastructure; manifestations of the smart-grid; two-way, smart revenue metering for system operating efficiencies, maximal utilization of renewable resources, improved power quality, and automated management of service disruptions; and evolving technologies offering security, reliability, and environmental sustainability of the electric infrastructure. 3 Credits

EEE 554 Advanced power Conversion Techniques
Energy conversion processes: general introduction. Energy sources, principles of conservation of energy balance equations. Direct electrical energy conversion:  introduction: maqneto hydro dynamo (MHD): fuel cell: thermo-electrostalic: Ferro-electric: photo -electrtc: photovoltatc, electrostatic and piezoelectric energy conversions: characteristics including efficiency, power densities, terminal properties and limitations. Electromechanical energy conversion: general introduction of electrical to mechanical, mechanical to electrical and electrical to electrical conversions, bulk energy conversion devices. General formulations of equations: co-ordinate transformation and terminal characteristics. 3 Credits

EEE 555 Power System Modeling and Control
Overview of power electronic applications at utility and demand sides: sources of harmonics: utility devices and consumer loads. Various models for nonlinear and dynamic loads. High voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission system modeling. AC-DC load flow studies. Modeling of flexible AC transmission systems  (FACTS): conventional thyristor controlled reactors and phase shifters.  voltage  source inverter (VSIl based static condenser (STATCON) and unified power flow  controller (UPFC). Transient stability and sub-synchronous resonance (SSR)  studies incorporating superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) models. Modeling of utility interfaced phot ovoltaic and wind energy sources. Power quality. cyclic and noncyclic  voltage  flicker. Total harmonic distortion (THO) analysis. Remedial measures and harmonic load flow studies.  3 Credits

EEE 556 Smart Grid Design and Operation
Introduction to smart grid and emerging technologies. Operating principles and models of smart grid components, including distributed energy sources and distribution feeder components. Communication infrastructures for smart grid operation. Advanced metering infrastructure and advanced control methods. Demand response and demand management. Distribution feeder analysis. Impact of smart grid component integration on distribution network operation. Smart grid reliability evaluation. 3 Credits

EEE 560 Advanced Computer Architecture
Advanced computer architectures focusing on multiprocessor systems and the principles of their design. Parallel computer models, parallelism conditions, flow control, partitioning, performance metrics, programming and interconnection network properties, principles of scaleable designs, Case studies and example applications of pipeline processors, interconnection networks, SIMD and MIMD processors. 3 Credits

EEE 563 Design of Systems on a Chip
Current state of the art in the system-level design of Systems on a Chip. The focus is in the hardware, scheduling, and applications at the highest levels of design, emerging trends in contrast to specifications and benchmark suites, networks on chip and multi-core organization, the impact of simulation and modeling, performance as speed ,latency and throughput, power, size,  numerical quantification and justification of the impact of changes in relationships between Applications, Architectures, Design and Evaluation. 3 Credits

EEE 568 Advanced VLSI Design
Advanced concepts in CMOS-based digital system design are studied. The topics include implementation of special purpose structures for complex digital systems, automation and verification of the design process, and design for testability; and design techniques for low-power design, power dissipation estimation, and application of low-power techniques in the different levels of the design hierarchy. 3 Credits

EEE 660 Computer Vision Systems 
Analysis of digital images and three-dimensional scenes. Image acquisition, representation of two- and three-dimensional shapes, visual cues for range estimation. Image filtering and histogram-based analysis for image enhancement, noise suppression, edge detection, region detection, and image segmentation. Introduction to such topics as visual texture, stereo vision, structured-light ranging, and motion analysis. 3 Credits

EEE 661 Network and Computer Security
Introduces both fundamental security principles as well as real-world applications of network and computer security. Covers a wide range of topics including authorization and access control, basic cryptography, authentication systems, e-commerce security, sensor network security, and legal and ethical issues. 3 Credits

EEE 586, 587, 588 & 589 Special Topics
Students can work for a Semester on an advanced topic in the area of Electronics or Electrical under the guidance of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Consent from the department chair and the concerned faculty. 3 Credits

Master of Science in Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering (MS ETE)

The objective of this 33 credit hour MS-ETE program is to train the students to become competent and efficient engineers in the telecommunications, computers and information technology. The curriculum has been designed in close alignment with similar programs of the North American and Canadian universities. The graduates will be able to plan, analyze, design, implement, operate, test, maintain and manage the telecommunications system and business. The program is highly recommended for students who wish to obtain technical as well as engineering management positions in the telecommunications and ICT industry.

Admissions Requirements:

  • General requirements for admission to the Masters’ in ETE program: A 4 year bachelors or equivalent degree in mathematics, applied physics, engineering, computer science & engineering, and information & communication technology from an accredited public or private university in Bangladesh or abroad with a grade point average of at least 2.5 (in the 4.0 scale) or minimum of 2nd class in BSc-Hons/MSc.
  • A 3-year bachelor's or equivalent degree in mathematics, applied physics, engineering, computer science & engineering, and information & communication technology or any related areas from an accredited public or private university in Bangladesh or abroad with a grade point average of at least 2.5 (in the 4.0 scale) or minimum of 2nd class (55% marks) in BSc-Hons/MSc may be admitted on condition that at least 15 credits of remedial courses must be completed at NSU in order to be a regular student in the MS in Electronic & Telecommunication Engineering program.
  • Acceptable score in the NSU administered Admission Test or a score of 1100 in the Quantitative and Verbal part of GRE General Test.
  • Three letters of recommendation

The program curriculum consists of a minimum of 33 credit hours including 6 core courses, 3 electives, and 1 graduate thesis work. Core classes engage the student in the study of telecommunications system, network and technology, with laboratory exercises, and designing telecommunications systems effectively within organizations. The elective courses provide a balanced diversification in the broader field of electronics and communications. The breakdown of the 33 credits is as follows:

6 courses from the core subjects:                                18 credits
3 courses from the elective subjects:                           9 credits
Graduate Thesis/(Project+course):                              6 credits

Thesis and Projects Options (must choose any one option):

(1) Option 1: ETE 699 Graduate Thesis                                 6 credits
(2) Option 2: ETE 599 Graduate Project+ an elective course
ETE 599 Graduate Project                                  3 credits
One elective course                                             3 credits
                                                                                   Total:   6 credits

Degree Requirements
The minimum and maximum time to complete the degree requirements are 3 semesters and 5 years respectively from the initial enrolment of the Masters’ program. The residency requirement is 24 credit hours including the Masters’ Thesis. A maximum of 9 credits are transferable from other universities.

The students must secure a GPA of 3.0 for the award of the MS-ETE degree. A student must complete required number of credits with minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4 point scale to earn the degree. To continue in the program a student must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 at all levels of academic advancement. If in any semester the GPA drops below 2.70 the student will be on academic probation. If a student remains on probation for two consecutive semesters, he/she will be dismissed from the program.

Core Courses (18 credits):

ETE 501 Electronics and Telecommunications Systems
ETE 502 Digital Communication Systems
ETE 503 Mobile and Wireless Communication System
ETE 507 Fiber-Optic Communications System
ETE 511 Semiconductors and Devices
ETE 512 Microelectronics and VLSI Design

Elective Courses (9 credits)

ETE 505 Advanced Computer Networks and Communications
ETE 506 Telecommunications Network and System Design
ETE 508 Digital Signal Processing and Filter design
ETE 521 Telecommunications Business and Management
ETE 536 Network Security
ETE 541 Thin Film Deposition for Semiconductor Devices
ETE 544 Introduction to Nanotechnologies
ETE 545 MEMS Technology and Devices
ETE 607 Satellite Communications

 

Course Descriptions

ETE 501 Electronics and Telecommunications Systems
Technical survey of the ways and means that voice, data, and video traffic are moved long distance. Topics covered include Electronic Components and System such as, Transmitters, Receivers, Waveguides, Antennae, Data Network Systems, the Telephone System (POTs, Network Synchronization and Switching, ISDN, SDH, Cellular Telephone); and Video systems (PAL, Switching and Timing, Compressed Video standards such as MPEG and Px64, HDTV).

ETE 502 Digital Communication System
System level analysis and design for digital and analog and communications systems: analog-to-digital conversion, PC and delta modulations; Digital and analog modulation types, demodulation of AM, DSB, FM, Noise in DSB; N Dimensional Signal Space, ASK, PSK, FSK M-ary communication, Spread Spectrum techniques; Detection techniques, matched filters, receiver design, link budgets, signal to noise ratios and bit error rates in AWGN and fading channels.

 

ETE 503 Mobile and Wireless Communications
Aspects of radiowave propagation for fixed and mobile communication systems, and cellular system design. Large-scale and small-scale propagation models, multipath fading, link-budget, interference and frequency reuse, multiple access schemes and system capacity. Trunking and grade of service, wireless network planning and operation. Architecture and operation of 2G cellular mobile systems, 2.5 G and 3G technologies. Special techniques/Diversity, Equalization, Interleaving, and Smart Antenna.

ETE 505 Advanced Computer Networks and Communications
Computer Networks is a graduate course that introduces fundamental concepts in the design and implementation of computer communication networks and their protocols. Topics include: layered network architectures, applications, transport and routing, IP version 6, mobile IP, multicasting, session initiation protocol, quality of service, network security, network management, and TCP/IP in wireless networks.  Specific emphasis will be placed on the protocols used in the Internet.

ETE 506 Telecommunications Network and System Design
Topics covered include Major technical issues in designing and integrating telecommunication networks; Basic concepts in telecom network design; Network architecture; Network Reliability; Network design constraints; Network design tool; Balance among several key attributes: performance, reliability, cost, and scalability. Being an application oriented course, students will gain practical experience through two projects using commercial software (e.g. OPNET IT GURU). The projects simulate the cases network engineers/ managers will face in their daily job in today's corporate world.

ETE 507 Fiber-Optic Communications System
Telecommunications: Point-to-Point Systems and Networks, Information Carrying Capacity, The Need for Fiber-Optic Communications Systems, A Fiber-Optic Communications System: The Basic Blocks, Worldwide Submarine Networks, Electromagnetic Spectrum, Radiation & Absorption, Optical Fibers-Basics: Step-Index Fiber, Numerical Aperture, Attenuation, Calculation of Total Attenuation, Intermodal and Chromatic Dispersion, Graded-Index Fiber, The Structure of a Singlemode Fiber, Bit Rate and Bandwidth, Cutoff Wavelength, V-Number, Attenuation Constant, Dispersion in Multimode Fibers, Electrical & Optical Bandwidth, Spectral Width, Singlemode Fibers, Gaussian Beam, Bit Rate of a Singlemode Fiber, Fabrication, Cabling, and Installation, Fiber Cable Connectorization and Testing, Power Budget, Light Sources, Transmitters and Receivers; Transmitter Modules, Receiver Units, Components of Fiber-Optic Networks; Passive Components, Switches, Transceivers, TDM,  WDM and DWDM systems, Add/Drop Problem, Multiplexing Hierarchy in Telecommunications, SONET & SDH Systems, FDDI, and Functional Modules of Fiber-Optic Networks-Telephone and Computer Networks, Networks, Protocols, and Services, OSI, ATM Networks and Layers; Broadband Communication System, Network Management and Future of Fiber-Optic Networks. 3 Credits.

ETE  508 Digital Signal Processing and Filter Design
Introduction to discrete linear systems; frequency-domain design of digital filters; quantization effects in digital filters; digital filter hardware discrete Fourier transforms; high-speed convolution and correlation with application to digital filtering; introduction to Walsh-Fourier theory.

ETE 511 Semiconductors and Devices
The course covers basic semiconductor properties, elemental quantum mechanics, energy band theory, equilibrium carrier statistics, and carrier transport, physical and electrical characteristics of pn junctions, bipolar junction transistors and field-effect transistors.  Emphasis will be on Si, Ge GaAs, InGaAsP materials, device fabrication and characterization of electrical and optical properties.

ETE 512 Microelectronics and VLSI Design
Design of very large-scale digital systems on a single chip. Review of MOS technology. Design rules imposed by fabrication techniques. Systematic structures for control and data flow; system timing; highly concurrent systems. Experimental opportunities available. Pre-requisite: ETE 511

ETE 521 Telecommunications Business and Management
Telecom services, local, long distance, mobile telephony, voice over IP, business models, operations and maintenance, cost and pricing for service packages, wireless vs wireline telephony, industry dynamics, market competition, regulatory issues, cost of compliance, ITU and telecom policy for local and global market, industry restructure, privatization trends in developing markets, spectrum management, licensing and fees, tariff, interconnection, overseas access, business models and business case analysis.

ETE 536 Network Security
Security requirements; Encryption algorithm, hashes and message digest, public key algorithm, key management; Security architecture, security policy design and management; Core Internet Security standards, IPSec, PKI, SSL/TLS, Kerberos, TLS, AES; Web security, email security, database security, operating system security; Security technologies, products and solutions, Firewall and secure router design, installation, configuration and maintenance, VPN implementation using routers and firewall's.

ETE 541 Thin Film Deposition for Semiconductor Devices
This course examines the principles and technologies of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) to prepare thin films for microelectronic applications. Topics include the deposition of semiconductors, insulators, and metals using low pressure (LPCVD) and metal-organic (MOCVD) chemical vapor deposition, evaporation, sputtering, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and ion-beam deposition; control of film properties; measurement of film properties; and selection of deposition methods for various applications. 

ETE 544  Introduction to Nanotechnologies.
An overview of the physics and technologies associated with producing nanometer-sized components. Looks at selected topics from solid state physics, chemistry, materials science, and IC fabrication technologies. Examines the potential structures and applications of various types of nanodevices; considers public concerns about the danger of nanotechnologies.
ETE 545 MEMS Technology and Devices
The course will begin with a summary of integrated circuit fabrication technologies leading into an overview of the technologies available to shape electromechanical elements on a sub millimeter scale. Physics of MEMS devices will be covered at a level necessary to design and analyze new devices and systems. Several commercially available MEMS processes will be discussed in detail, and students will design final projects in these processes.
ETE 607 Satellite Communications
Introduction to Satellite Communications; Orbital Aspects of Earth Satellites (Introduction Kepler’s first, second & third law, orbits, geostationary orbits); Satellite Link Design; Propagation on Satellite-Earth Paths and Its Influence on Link Design; Modulation, Multiplexing and Multiple Access Techniques in Satellite Communications; Satellite Networking ; Spacecraft and Earth Station Technology; Types of Satellite Networks; Performance and Reliability of Satellite Communications.

ETE 699 Graduate Thesis
Special advanced topics, projects, and independent study in telecommunications engineering, technology and management leading to the graduate thesis. Application of knowledge and skills developed in core courses in an organizational environment to solve telecommunications management problems. Integration of concepts and adaptation of theory to fit organizational reality. 6 Credits.

Department of Mathematics & Physics

The Department of Mathematics and Physics offers courses that are required for the university-wide general education and science requirement of SEPS. Apart from this, students from other disciplines may take a Minor in Mathematics, provided 10 selected courses in mathematics equivalent to 30 credit hours are completed.

Course Descriptions


MAT 112

College Algebra
Fundamentals of Algebra: Real Numbers, Fundamentals of Algebra: Exponents, Polynomials, Fundamentals of Algebra: Factoring, Rational expressions, Radicals, Linear equations, Formulas and Applications, Quadratic equations, Other types of Equations, Inequalities, Cartesian Co-ordinate systems, Graphing Relations, Functions, Linear Functions, Equations of a line, Symmetry, Algebra of Functions, Inverse Functions, Quadratic Functions, Synthetic Division, Exponential Functions, Logarithmic Functions, Equations on Exponential and Logarithmic functions, Systems of Equations, Systems of Inequalities; Linear Programming, Matrix Solution of Linear Systems, Properties of Matrices, Determinants, Cramer’s rule, Matrix Inverse..Prerequisite: High School Mathematics. 3 Credits

MAT 116

Precalculus
Behavior of functions in some depth including properties, graphs, inverses, transformations, and compositions. This course pays particular attention to linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. It covers trigonometric functions and inverse trigonometric functions as well.  Prerequisite: High School Mathematics. 3 Credits

MAT 120

Calculus I
Covers basic calculus and analytic geometry. Coordinates, Graphs and Lines; Functions and Limits; Differentiations; Application of Differentiation; Integration; Logarithmic and Exponential Functions.
Prerequisite: MAT 116. 3 Credits

MAT 125

InIntroduction to Linear Algebra
Homogeneous and Nonhomogeneous System of Linear Equations, Echelon form, Gaussian Elimination Method (unique, infinite numbers and no solutions) Properties of Determinants, Determinant by Cofactor Expansion, Evaluating Higher Order Determinants by Row Reduction, Cramer’s Rule, Matrices and Matrix Operations, Transpose, Properties of Transpose, Triangular, Symmetric and Skew Symmetric Matrices, Inverse, Properties of Invertible Matrices, Method of Finding the Inverse of a Matrix, Further Results on   System of Linear Equations using Inverse Matrix Technique, Rank .Introduction to Vectors, Vector addition and Scalar multiplication, Norm of a vector, Dot Product, Projections, Euclidean n-Space, Real Vector Space, Subspace, Linear Combinations, Linear Dependence and Independence, Spanning Set, Basis, Dimensions, Solution Space, Null Space, Rank and Nullity. General Linear Transformation, Kernel and Image of Linear Mapping, Rank and Nullity of Linear Mapping. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, Cayley Hamilton Theorem, Diagonalization.Geometric Linear Programming, Applications in Business and Economics. Prerequisite: MAT 116 or an adequate test score. 3 Credits

MAT 130

Calculus II
Second course in calculus and analytic geometry. Applications of Definite Integral; Hyperbolic Functions, Inverse Trigonometric and Hyperbolic Functions; Techniques of Integration; Improper Integrals: L’Hospitals Rule; Topics of Analytical Geometry; Polar Coordinates and Parametric Equations. Prerequisite:  MAT 120. 3 Credits

MAT 250

Calculus III
Infinite Series; Three Dimensional Vector Spaces; Vector valued Functions; Partial Derivatives: Functions of two variables, limits and continuity, partial derivatives, differentiability and chain rule, directional derivatives and gradients, tangent planes and normal vectors, maxima and minima of functions of two variables. Multiple Integrals: Double integrals, double integrals over non-rectangular regions, double integrals in polar coordinates, triple integrals, centroid, centerof gravity, triple integrals in cylindrical and spherical coordinates, change of variables in multiple. Topics in vector calculus: Vector fields, line integrals, Green’s theorem, surface integrals, the divergence theorem, stokes theorem. Prerequisite:  MAT 130, 3 Credits

MAT 350

Engineering Mathematics
First and Second Order Differential Equations. First order ordinary differential equations, linear differential equations with constant coefficients, Laplace transformations, Fourier transformation, power-series solutions of differential equations, Bessel functions. Prerequisite:  MAT 250. 3 Credits

MAT 361

Introduction to Probability and Statistics
Basics of elementary probability theory; discrete and continuous random variables along with their probability distributions (cumulative distribution function; expected values and variance); special random variables: Bernoulli, binomial, geometric, negative binomial, Poisson, hyper-geometric, uniform, exponential and normal distributions); multivariate distributions (joint distributions; marginal and conditional distributions; covariance and correlation); descriptive statistics and sampling distribution of statistics; parameter estimation by moment and maximum likelihood method; comparing the performance of estimators using properties of unbiasedness, efficiency and minimum variance; confidence interval estimation for the mean and difference of two means; hypothesis testing on mean and difference of two means. Prerequisite: MAT 250. 3 Credits.

     MAT 370

Real & Complex Analysis
The Real Numbers, Sequences, Limits, Continuity and Uniform, Continuity of Functions, Differentiation, The Riemann Integral, Sequences of Functions and their Convergence, Infinite Series, The Topology of Real Numbers. Prerequisite: MAT 250. 3 Credits

MAT 480

Differential Equations
Introduction to Differential Equations, first-order Differential Equations, applications of first order Differential Equations, Linear Differential Equations of higher-order, Applications of second-order Differential Equations with variable coefficient Systems of Linear Differential Equations. Prerequisite: MAT 250. 3 Credits

MAT 490

Advanced Engineering Mathematics
Laplace Transform, Existence of Laplace Transform, Inverse Laplace Transform, Laplace Transform of Derivatives and Integrals, Shifting on the s-axis, Shifting on the t-axis, Differentiation and Integration of Laplace Transform, Convolution, Inverse Laplace Transform of partial Fractions, Inverse Laplace Transform of periodic Functions, Fourier Series FS for Functions of Period 2p or arbitrary period, Fourier Series for Even and odd Functions, Half-Range Fourier Expansion, Determination of Fourier Coefficients without Integration, Fourier Approximations and minimum square error, The Fast Fourier Transform, Complex Variable Functions, Limits and Continuity, Derivatives, Analyticity and Cauchy-Riemann Equations, Conformal Mapping, Relation between Analyticity and Coformality, Mobius and other Transformations, Complex Integrals, Cauchy Integral Formulae, Taylor’s Series, Singular Points, Laurent’s Series, Residues and Residue  Theorem, Evaluation of Real Definite Integrals using Complex Integrals.  Prerequisite: MAT 250. 3 Credits

 

MAT 495

 

Abstract Algebra
Sets and Equivalence Relations, Semigroups&Monoids, Free Semigroup& Free Monoid, Congruence Relations and Quotient Structures, Fundamental Theorem of Semigroup Homomorphism, Groups, Sn, Zn, Subgroups, Normal Subgroups, Generating Sets, Generators, Fundamental Theorem, Lagrange’s Theorem, Quotient Group, Cyclic Subgroups, Generating Sets, Generators, Fundamental Theorem of group Homomorphism, Rings and Ideals, Fundamental Theorem of Ring Homomorphism, Integral Domain, Principal Ideal Domain, Divisibility in Integral Domain, Unique Factorization Domain, Field, K [T]- the polynomials over a field K, K [t] as a Principal Ideal Domain and Unique Factorization Domain, Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, Ordered Sets and Lattices, Principle of Duality, Bounded Lattices, Distributive Lattices, Complemented  Lattice.  Prerequisite: MAT 250. 3 Credits

PHY 105

Fundamentals of Physics
Vectors, equations of motions, Newton’s laws, conservation laws of energy, linear momentum, Work-Energy theorem, extension of linear into rotational motion including the conservation laws, gravitation, simple harmonic motion, travelling waves, calorimetry, thermal equilibrium, 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics. Prerequisite: None. 3 Credits

PHY 105L

Lab of Fundamentals of Physics
Introduction to Measurements and Statistical Error, Force table, Atwood machine, Hook’s law, Mass-spring oscillation, Simple pendulum, Compound pendulum and Static equilibrium. 1 Credit

 

PHY 107

Physics I
Vectors, equations of motions, Newton’s laws, conservation laws of energy, linear momentum, Work-Energy theorem, extension of linear into rotational motion including the conservation laws, gravitation, simple harmonic motion, travelling waves, calorimetry, thermal equilibrium, 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics. Prerequisite: MAT 120 and Physics in HSC/A Level. 3 Credits

PHY 107L

Lab of Physics 107
Introduction to Measurements and Statistical Error, Force table, Atwood machine, Hook’s law, Mass-spring oscillation, Simple pendulum, Compound pendulum and Static equilibrium. 1 Credit

PHY 108

Physics II
Electricity and Magnetism: Coulomb’s Law, Electric field and Gauss’s Law, Potential, Capacitance field, Magnetic forces, Induced Electromotive force,AC circuit.Electric Field and Potential:- Conceptually, Electric Field and Potential:- Discrete System , Electric Field and Potential:- Continuous System, Electric Field and Potential:- Gauss’s Law, Capacitors and Capacitance, Dielectric, Ohm’s Law, Circuit Theory, Magnetic Force I, Magnetic Force II, Biot-Severt Law, Ampere’s Law, Inductance I, Inductance II, Alternating Fields and Current I, Alternating Fields and Current II, Maxwell’s Equation, Magnetic Properties of  Matter. Prerequisite: MAT 130 and PHY 107. 3 Credits

 

PHY 108L

 

Lab of Physics II
Introduction to electric equipment, Verification of Ohm’s law, Charging and Discharging of capacitor, Time constant of a Circuit with resistor and capacitor in series and Magnetic induction. 1 Credit

BSC 201

Basic Science (Math & Physics)
Representation of functions numerically, graphically and algebraically, linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, root/power, piecewise-defined, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions. The algebraic structure and graph of a function, intercepts, domain, range, intervals on which the function is increasing, decreasing or constant, the vertex of a quadratic function, asymptotes. Concept of heat, temperature, laws of thermodynamics, and different types of thermal processes. The kinetic theory of gases, specific heat of ideal gases, Maxwell’s laws of equipartition of energy and related problems. Prerequisite: None. 3 Credits

STA 172

Introduction to Statistics
Data collection and presentation, descriptive statistics, probability distributions, sampling distributions and the central limit theorem, point estimation and hypothesis testing, one way ANOVA, goodness of fit and contingency table, correlation and regression analysis. Applications are taken from a broad variety of fields such as biological and medical sciences, engineering, social sciences and economics. Prerequisite: None. 3 Credits.

Minor in Mathematics
Students from any discipline may take a Minor in Mathematics, provided 10 selected courses equivalent to 30 credit hours of mathematics courses are completed. The ten courses required to be completed for a minor in Mathematics are: MAT 120, MAT 125, MAT 130, MAT 240, MAT 250, MAT 350, MAT 370, MAT 480, MAT 490 and MAT 495.


SchoolofEngineeringandPhysicalSciences