Department of Biology & Chemistry

Undergraduate Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry & Biotechnology

BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY (BBT)    (120 Credit Hours)

UNIVERSITY General education Courses   (37 Credit Hours)

Languages                                                                 (12 Credit Hours)
English composition                                                    6
English speech/Professional Communication             3
Literature                                                                    3

Humanities                                                                (9 Credit Hours)
Philosophy/Ethics                                                       3
History (World/Indo-Bangladesh/Islamic)                 6

Social Sciences                                                          (9 Credit Hours)
Political Science/Government                                     3
Economics (Micro/Macro Principles)                          3
Soc./Geog./Anthropology                                           3

     Computer & Math skills                       
Introduction to Computers                                         3
College Algebra/Pre-calculus in SHLS core               3         
Statistics I                            in SHLS core                 3

Sciences (with Lab)                                               (4 Credit Hours)
Biology I                                 in SHLS core             4
Chemistry I                            in SHLS core             4
Physics I                                                                      4

Science/School of Health & Life Sciences core                  (36 Credit Hours)
College Algebra/Pre-calculus                                   3
Statistics I                                                                  3
Survey of Calculus                                                    3
Statistics II (Biostatistics)                                         3
 With Lab
Biology I                                                                    4
Biology II                                                                 4
Chemistry I                                                                4
General Chemistry II                                                4                                                               
Organic Chemistry I                                                 4
Organic Chemistry II                                                4

Major Required Courses                                                        (29 Credit Hours)
Human Physiology                                                      3
Metabolism                                                                 3
Chemistry & Application of Enzymes                        3
Plant Biochemistry & Biotechnology                         3
Molecular Genetics                                                     3
Cell Biology                                                                3
Senior Seminar                                                            3
        With Lab
Molecular Biology                                                      4
Immunology                                                                4

 ELECTIVE COURSES                                                   (9 Credit Hours)
Molecular Biotechnology                                           3
Bioinformatics                                                             3
Neurochemistry & Endocrinology                              3
Pharmaceutical Biotechnology                                   3
Clinical Biochemistry                                                 3
Applied Immunology & Immunogenetics                 3

FREE ELECTIVE COURSES                                                  (9 Credit Hours)

 

List of Elective Courses:                                                              (9 Credits)

  1. BBT415 - Molecular Biotechnology                                       3
  2. BBT416 - Bioinformatics                                                       3
  3. BBT417 - Neurochemistry and Endocrinology                      3
  4. BBT418 - Pharmaceutical Biotechnology                              3
  5. BBT419 – Clinical Biochemistry                                            3
  6. BBT421 – Applied Immunology and Immunogenetics         3

Recommended Free Elective Courses:

  1. MIC301 Basic Microbiology                                                    3
  2. MIC305 Food Microbiology and Quality Control                   3
  3. MIC306 Virology                                                                     3
  4. MIC404 Environmental Microbiology & Bioremediation       3
  5. MIC403 Microbial Biotechnology                                           3                            

 

 

Course Descriptions

UNIVERSITY General Education Courses               (37 CREDITS)

Please see General Education (GE) Requirements: The Courses on Page 34                     

SCIENCE/SCHOOL OF HEALTH & LIFE SCIENCES CORE (36 CREDITS)
MAT 116  College Algebra/Pre-calculus                                            3
BBT 203   Statistics I                                                                         3
MAT 120 Calculus I                                                                           3
BBT 230  Statistics II (Biostatistics)                                                  3
BIO 103  Biology I                                                                             4
BIO 201  Biology II                                                                           4
CHE 101  Chemistry I                                                                        4
CHE 201  Chemistry II                                                                      4
CHE 202  Organic Chemistry I                                                          4
CHE 301  Organic Chemistry II                                                         4


MAT 120

Calculus I
Covers basic calculus and analytic geometry. Coordinates, Graphs and Lines; Functions and Limits; Differentiations; Application of Differentiation; Integration; Logarithmic and Exponential Functions.  Prerequisite: MAT 116. 3 Credits

BBT 230

Statistics II (Biostatistics)
This class presents fundamental concepts in data analysis and statistical inference, focusing on one and two independent samples. Students having taken this class should be able to summarize samples, perform relevant hypothesis tests and perform a collection of two sample comparisons. Classical non-parametric methods and discrete data analysis methods are discussed. The topics cover: Hypothesis Testing; Power and sample size and two group tests; Tests for binomial proportions; Two sample binomial tests, delta method; Fisher's exact tests, Chi-squared tests; Simpson's paradox, confounding; Retrospective case-control studies, exact inference for the odds ratio; Methods for matched pairs, McNemar's, conditional versus marginal odds ratios; Non-parametric tests, permutation tests; Inference for Poisson counts; and Multiplicity. 3 Credits

BIO 201

Biology II
This course introduces history, scope and future of Biochemistry and biotechnology. Students learn the basic logics of living organisms, the role of bio-molecules and their interrelationship. The course provides following introductory concepts: i) define and explain the basic concepts in biochemistry; ii) various biochemical pathways; iii) define the biological macromolecules and their subunits; iv) basic applied concepts in biochemistry to biotechnology; v) explain the underlying concepts in biotechnology; and vi) relate the biochemical properties and their principles as tools of biotechnology.
Laboratory work: Main objective of the laboratory section is to bring experience in solving practical problems in biochemistry laboratory, to acquire applicable skills and to teach students to derive conclusions from experiments. Biochemistry part also demonstrates methods of clinical biochemistry and their significance for diagnosis of diseases. 4 Credits

 

CHE 201

 

Chemistry II
Thermodynamics - First law, Second law and Introduction, definitions, Thermodynamic terms and basic concepts; Thermochemistry, Exothermic and endothermic reactions, standard enthalpy of formation, thermochemical equations; The nature of chemical equilibrium, law of mass action, equilibrium constant,  relationship between ?G and Keq, effect of temperature and pressure, Le Chatelier’s principle,, Chemical Kinetics and it Definition, reaction rate, rate laws, order reactions, molecularity of a reaction, pseudo first order reaction, half-life, Catalysis, Photochemistry and Spetrophotometry, Transmittance and absorbance, Beer-Lambert law, Properties of liquids, Acids and bases.
Laboratory Work: The laboratory section includes following experiments: Calibration of the calorimeter, determining the heat of fusion of ice, determination of specific heat of an unknown metal, determination of heat of solution and heat of neutralization, determination of second order reaction: iodination of aniline by measuring the optical density of reaction medium. 4 Credits

CHE 202

Organic Chemistry I
This course is a comprehensive introduction in fundamental aspects of biological chemistry, for freshmen students. Knowledge of structure, functionality and reactivity of the organic molecules is vital for understanding the mechanism of numerous biological processes and biochemical reactions. This course provides a foundation of organic chemistry, i.e. the understanding of structure, properties, interactions, transformations and nomenclature of organic compounds. Major topics included: Structure & Properties of the Organic Compounds & Bonding; Saturated Hydrocarbons: Alkanes and Cyclic Alkanes; Unsaturated Hydrocarbons: Alkenes & Alkynes; Introduction to Isomerism; Alkyl Halides; Introduction to Aromaticity: Benzene and its derivatives; Alcohol, Phenols & Ethers (-OH group/derivatives); Chemistry of Carbonyl (-CO-) compounds and carboxylic acid derivatives.
Laboratory Work:  The students will get practical experiences on the detection of an unknown organic compound based on their physical and chemical properties. Emphasis will be given on the nature of different laboratory solutions and how to prepare them accurately. Moreover students will also get basic idea how to detect specific organic compound present in biological sample. A number of specific organic reactions will also be demonstrated in this lab. 4 Credits  

CHE 301

Organic Chemistry II
The course starts with a review of organic functional group's structure & functions and stereochemistry. Later, the discussion will continue with the structures of small bio-molecules, e.g. carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleotides, and lipids. Next, the formation of large bio-molecules from these building blocks is described with reaction mechanisms in terms of the RNA world hypothesis.  The chemistry behind the formation and degradation of these compounds both in vitro and in vivo will be covered with emphasis on learning about complex biological systems from simpler chemical ones. The curriculum covers: carbohydrate chemistry, amino acids chemistry, lipids, lipoproteins, cholesterol and nucleic acid chemistry, introduction to bioorganic synthesis of secondary metabolites.
Laboratory Work: The organic chemistry laboratory section includes detection of different bio-molecules from various sources, determination of chemical properties of representative organic molecules, and detection of organic contents of representative biological samples. 4 Credits

MAJOR REQUIRED COURSES                                      (29 CREDITS)
BBT 312  Molecular Biology                                      4
BBT 313  Human Physiology                                     3
BBT 314  Chemistry & Application of Enzymes       3
BBT 315  Metabolism                                                 3
BBT 316  Immunology                                               4
BBT 413  Plant Biochemistry & Biotechnology       3
BBT 317  Molecular Genetics                        3
BBT 318  Cell Biology                                               3
BBT 422  Senior Seminar                                           3

BBT 312

Molecular Biology
Molecular biology course deals with nucleic acids and proteins and how these molecules interact within the cell to promote proper growth, division, and development. It is a large and ever-changing discipline. This course will emphasize the molecular mechanisms of DNA replication, repair, transcription, protein synthesis, and gene regulation in different organisms. The topics cover in the courses are Introduction to genetics, Basic principles of Heredity, Chromosomal basis of inheritance, The chemical nature of the gene, DNA replication, RNA molecules, Transcription, Post transcriptional modification, Genetic code, Translation and Plasmid features.
Laboratory Work: The lab course is designed to introduce the students to the technical world of molecular biology. In this course the student will learn basic techniques use in molecular biology including DNA and RNA isolation, purification and detection, restriction analysis, polymerase chain reactions (PCR), expression cloning, SDS gel electrophoresis and western blotting. 4 Credits

BBT 313

Human Physiology
Physiology is the study of how living organism functions. The main theme of human physiology is the molecular and cellular interaction to maintain the constant internal environment, i.e. homeostasis. This course commences with the principles of physiology, which is followed by an elaborate discussion of molecular-cellular physiology with a specific focus on neural and endocrine control and integration of homeostasis. Individual organ systems, including musculoskeletal, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems are also given emphasis for a complete understanding that how the human body functions. 3 Credits

BBT 314

Chemistry & Application of Enzymes
he objective of this course is to provide understanding on protein structure, properties and their most important functions. Key concepts related to this course are studying properties of amino acids and peptides, reaction and analysis of amino acids, different structural level of organization of proteins with specific examples, how protein interact with other molecules related to their function, and different analytical techniques use in protein chemistry. Studying enzymes and its classification, enzyme kinetics, enzyme's mechanisms of action, enzyme inhibition, regulation, and reaction mechanism of some enzymes and clinical, diagnostic and industrial application of enzymes are also key notions relation to this course. This course will be useful for future studies in biochemistry, microbiology, molecular and cellular biology, and biotechnology, pharmaceutical and medically related fields. 3 Credits

BBT 315

Metabolism
Major topics include: Bioenergetics and thermodynamics; The glycolytic pathway, pentose phosphate pathway; The citric acid cycle: Steps and reactions; Gluconeogenesis and Reciprocal regulation of gluconeogenesis and glycolysis, Metabolic fates of Amino groups, enzymatic degradation of the dietary proteins to amino acids; Oxidative phosphorylation and photophosphorylation and regulation; Nitrogen metabolism, Integration and hormonal regulation of mammalian metabolism. Digestion, mobilization, and transport of Fatty acids: absorption of the dietary fatty acids in the small intestine; Lipid Metabolism I: Utilization and storage of energy in lipid form; Lipid Metabolism II: Pathways of Metabolism of special Lipids such as Phospholipids, Cholesterol, Sphingolipids; Mechanisms involved in switching the metabolism of the liver between the well-fed state and the starved state; Clinical correlations: Obesity, Respiratory distress syndrome, Atherosclerosis. 3 Credits

BBT 316

Immunology
The purpose of this course is to provide a basic knowledge of immunology. This course will provide in-depth understanding the cells, molecules and organs of the immune system and how they work   together to protect us from pathogen. The principal focus of the course will be on studying structural features of the components of the immune system and their functions, innate and adaptive branches of both humoral and cellular responses of the immune system. The course will also assign emphasis on learning the major mechanisms by which immune cells protect us from different types of pathogens or from cancer cells, how immune cells detect the presence of pathogens and cancer cells, processes that lead to the elimination of pathogens. Studying the structure and function of key immune recognition molecules including antigens, antibodies, antigen receptors, MHC proteins, and cytokines are covered. The course will introduce some immunological assays to detect antigen-antibody interactions.
Laboratory Work: This laboratory part will concentrate on the immunological methods used to evaluate human disease and will include the theoretical basis for tests of immune function, practical laboratory application of assays based on these principles and case-based study. The learning objectives of this unit are to understand the immunological basis for infection and immunity and how these concepts are applied in the diagnostic pathology laboratory; to understand how the immune system causes and prevents disease, the use and performance of immunological tests. 4 Credits

BBT 317

Molecular Genetics
Molecular genetics is an essential tool for studying biology. This course discusses in details the mechanisms underlying the storage, transmission and expression of heritable information in the genetic and chromosomal level of an organism. The topics that are included in this course are mutation and its repair; recombination and its role in DNA repair and genetic diversity; Transfer of genetic materials in prokaryotes, the concept of regulation of gene expression; developmental biology with model organism Drosophila melanogaster. At the end, this course discusses about the principle and application of recombinant DNA technology. 3 Credits

BBT 318

Cell Biology
The cell is a fascinating, complex, and dynamic unit that is constantly interacting with the surrounding environment and making active decisions, by an enormous number of biochemical and biophysical process. A sound knowledge of cell biology is required to understand the diverse cellular components  (structure  and  function)  at  a  molecular  level  that  compose  multicellular organisms. Cell biology forms the core of basic scientific investigations and current bio-medical research. Major topics included in this course are: membrane structure and function, intracellular compartments and protein sorting, intracellular vesicular traffic (secretion and endocytosis), mechanism of cellular communications, cytoskeleton, the cell cycle and cell death. Skills and knowledge from this course will be a great advantage for the students' future research carrier. 3 Credits

BBT 413

Plant Biochemistry & Biotechnology
This course provides a deepening of the subject in areas of plant physiology and plant biochemistry and provides a basic knowledge of plant molecular biology and plant biotechnology. The course is dealing with the life processes of plants: Seed germination, plant growth, anatomy and differentiation, metabolism, photosynthesis, stress physiology and flowering. The specific characteristics of plants are introduced such as cell wall synthesis, cell extension, the three genomes, gene regulation, plant growth hormones and natural products. In addition methods of molecular biology used in plant biotechnology such as plant model systems, transformation methods, plant tissue specific expression and use of databases are introduced. 3 Credits

BBT 422

Senior Seminar
The objective of this course is to give students the confidence to make oral presentations before small and large audiences and to train students in basic skills in preparing and delivering audio visual presentations, including audience interaction and effective use of visual aids.
Students will prepare and present on various topics throughout the semester, which will be evaluated by the faculty. They will also be expected to answer questions and tackle problems during the presentation. Through this course, students will be able to perform presentations and different types of scientific papers compatible with the world class recognized standards and formats. 3 Credits

ELECTIVE COURSES                                                                       (9 CREDITS)
BBT 415  Molecular Biotechnology                                                   3
BBT 416  Bioinformatics                                                                    3
BBT 417  Neurochemistry & Endocrinology                                     3
BBT 418  Pharmaceutical Biotechnology                                           3
BBT 419  Clinical Biochemistry                                                         3
BBT 421  Applied Immunology & Immunogenetics                         3

 

 

 

BBT 415

 

Molecular Biotechnology
Molecular Biotechnology is an evolving field of science that integrates applications from molecular biology, biochemistry, immunology, genetics and microbiology to create useful products in areas as diverse as human and animal health, agriculture, food and sustainable energy production, and the textile industry. This course will provide sound knowledge regarding transfer of genetic information between organisms to capitalize on existing biological processes to create new and innovative products. Topics include: recombinant DNA technology; chemical synthesis, amplification & sequencing of DNA; manipulation of gene expression in prokaryotes; heterologous protein production in eukaryotes; site directed mutagenesis & protein engineering, development of transgenic animal and use of molecular biotechnology to synthesize commercial products. 3 Credits

BBT 416

Bioinformatics
The course provides a broad overview of bioinformatics and computational biology as applied to biological research. Course material will be geared towards answering specific biological questions ranging from detailed analysis of a single gene through whole-genome analysis. The course include topics: Biological Databases; BLAST and Sequence Alignment; Protein Bioinformatics; Prokaryotic & Eukaryotic Genome analysis, Human variation (SNP) analysis, Phylogenetic tree construction and plasmid (both cloning & expression vector) designing. 3 Credits

 

BBT 417

Neurochemistry & Endocrinology
The major target of this course is to acquire an understanding of current theories of mechanisms of neural and endocrine functions and their implications for both basic knowledge and its application in modern biology.
The neurochemistry part of the course comprises the biochemistry of the nervous system; neurotransmitter synthesis and metabolic mechanisms at the synapse, release and re-uptake/degradation of classical neurotransmitters and peptide transmitters. Receptors for neurotransmitters and their ligands will be discussed from a chemical-pharmacological point of view including the relevance of these molecules and their interactions for development of tolerance, super-sensitivity and long-term potentiation.
The endocrinology part of the course covers the endocrine system and its hormonal products, including the characterization of hormone producing cells, synthesis and modification mechanisms of the hormones, release and transport of the hormones of different chemical nature, various hormone receptors and the mechanisms of hormone action, the effects of hormones on target cells, and physiological processes, as well as the diseases caused by inappropriate hormone functions. This course will cover the general principles of endocrinology, followed by brief discussion of the system-based endocrinology. 3 Credits

 

BBT 418

 

Pharmaceutical Biotechnology
The course is designed to equip students with a basic knowledge of concepts directly relevant to working in the biopharmaceutitical industry. The course topics include five sections: 1) Introduction (definition of traditional pharmaceutical, biologic and biotechnological product; advantages of producing biotechnological products by recombinant means); 2) Biotechnological drug development (introductory xenobiotics, preclinical studies and clinical trials, developing recombinant therapeutic protein); 3) The biotechnological products manufacturing process (Overview of cell banking systems, typical upstream and downstream processes, Fermentation, Product recovery, stabilization and formulation); 4) Biotechnological product regulation; 5) Practical aspect of pharmaceutical manufacture (Overview of QA and QC); 6) The biochemistry, production and medical uses of selected biotechnology products (Insulin, hormone, monoclonal antibodies, recombinant vaccines, gene therapy, cancer therapy). 3 Credits            

BBT 419

Clinical Biochemistry
This course will introduce diagnostic enzymology and the role of clinical biochemistry in evaluating diseases related to hepatic, renal, respiratory, and thyroid function and genetic disorder. An overview of the biochemistry of various diseases such as atherosclerosis, hepatitis, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, obesity, gout, mal-absorption syndromes, acidosis and alkalosis will be given.  3 Credits           

BBT 421

Applied Immunology & Immunogenetics
This course will enable understanding of the genetic aspects of the immune response and the role of the immune system in health and disease. Genetics of immune recognition molecules and its   knowledge in research and therapy will be discussed. Current experimental   approaches in immunology, including production of monoclonal antibodies,   antibody engineering and their application are covered. This course will provide understanding of how excessive, inappropriate and defective immune responses can lead to hypersensitivity reactions, autoimmune and    immunodeficiency diseases. Topics of current immunological interest, including immune tolerance, transplantation, vaccines and tumor immunology will be studied. 3 Credits

 

FREE ELECTIVE COURSES                                                       (9 CREDITS)
Bachelor of Science in Microbiology

BS in Microbiology (MIC)                                        (120 Credit Hours)

UNIVERSITY General Education Courses   (37 Credit Hours)

Languages                                                                        (12 Credit Hours)
English composition                                                                6
English speech/Professional Communication                         3
Literature                                                                                3

Humanities                                                                       (9 Credit Hours)
Philosophy/Ethics                                                                   3
History (World/Indo-Bangladesh/Islamic)                             6

Social Sciences                                                                  (9 Credit Hours)
Political Science/Government                                                 3
Economics (Micro/Macro Principles)                                      3
Soc./Geog./Anthropology                                                       3

         Computer & Math skills                       
Introduction to Computers                                                     3
College Algebra/Pre-calculus     in SHLS core          3         
Statistics I                                    in SHLS core                      3

Sciences (with Lab)                                                            (4 Credit Hours)
Biology I                                         in SHLS core                   4
Chemistry I                                     in SHLS core                   4
Physics I                                                                                  4

Science/School of Health & Life Sciences core                  (36 Credit Hours)
College Algebra/Pre-calculus                                               3
Statistics I                                                                              3
Survey of Calculus                                                                  3
Statistics II (Biostatistics)                                                     3
 With Lab    
Biology I                                                                                4
Biology II                                                                             4
Chemistry I                                                                            4
General Chemistry II                                                            4                                                               
Organic Chemistry I                                                             4
Organic Chemistry II                                                            4

MICROBIOLOGY  CORE                                                      (29 Credit Hours)
Molecular Biology                                                                  3
Microbial Chemistry and Metabolism                                     3                                              
Microbial Genetics                                                                  3
Food Microbiology and Quality Control                                3
Virology                                                                                  3
Bacterial Pathogenesis                                                            3
Senior Seminar                                                                        3
       With Lab                        
Basic Microbiology                                                                 4
Infectious Diseases and
Diagnostic Microbiology                                                        4

ELECTIVE COURSES                                                            (9 Credit Hours)
Immunology                                                                            3
Agricultural microbiology & Plant pathology                         3                                                     
Microbial Biotechnology                                                        3
Environmental Microbiology & Bioremediation                    3                                             
Bioinformatics                                                                        3
Microbial Taxonomy                                                  3
FREE ELECTIVE COURSES                                             (9 Credit Hours)

List of Elective Courses:                                                                             9 Credits
1.  MIC 401  Immunology                                                                  3
2.  MIC 402  Agricultural microbiology &  Plant pathology              3                                                 3.   MIC 403  Microbial Biotechnology                                              3
4.  MIC 404  Environmental Microbiology & Bioremediation           3                                            
5.  MIC 405  Bioinformatics                                                               3
6.  MIC 406  Microbial Taxonomy                                                     3

Recommended Free Elective Courses:                                            (Any 9 Credits)

Course  Descriptions
UNIVERSITY GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES               (37 CREDITS)

Please see University General Education (GE) Courses: The Course List on page 34

SCIENCE/SCHOOL OF HEALTH & LIFE SCIENCES CORE (36 CREDITS)
MAT 116 College Algebra/Pre-calculus                                             3
BBT 203   Statistics I                                                                         3
MAT 120 Calculus I                                                                           3
BBT 230  Statistics II (Biostatistics)                                                  3
BIO 103  Biology I                                                                             4
BIO 201  Biology II                                                                           4
CHE 101  Chemistry I                                                                        4
CHE 201  Chemistry II                                                                      4
CHE 202  Organic Chemistry I                                                          4
CHE 301  Organic Chemistry II                                                         4

MAT 120

Calculus I
Covers basic calculus and analytic geometry. Coordinates, Graphs and Lines; Functions and Limits; Differentiations; Application of Differentiation; Integration; Logarithmic and Exponential Functions. Prerequisite: MAT116. 3 Credits

BBT 230

Statistics II (Biostatistics)
This class presents fundamental concepts in data analysis and statistical inference, focusing on one and two independent samples. Students having taken this class should be able to summarize samples, perform relevant hypothesis tests and perform a collection of two sample comparisons. Classical non-parametric methods and discrete data analysis methods are discussed. The topics cover: Hypothesis Testing; Power and sample size and two group tests; Tests for binomial proportions; Two sample binomial tests, delta method; Fisher's exact tests, Chi-squared tests; Simpson's paradox, confounding; Retrospective case-control studies, exact inference for the odds ratio; Methods for matched pairs, McNemar's, conditional versus marginal odds ratios; Non-parametric tests, permutation tests; Inference for Poisson counts; and Multiplicity. 3 Credits

BIO 201

Biology II
This course introduces history, scope and future of Biochemistry and biotechnology. Students learn the basic logics of living organisms, the role of bio-molecules and their interrelationship. The course provides following introductory concepts: i) define and explain the basic concepts in biochemistry; ii) various biochemical pathways; iii) define the biological macromolecules and their subunits; iv) basic applied concepts in biochemistry to biotechnology; v) explain the underlying concepts in biotechnology; and vi) relate the biochemical properties and their principles as tools of biotechnology.
Laboratory work: Main objective of the laboratory section is to bring experience in solving practical problems in biochemistry laboratory, to acquire applicable skills and to teach students to derive conclusions from experiments. Biochemistry part also demonstrates methods of clinical biochemistry and their significance for diagnosis of diseases. 4 Credits

CHE 201

Chemistry II
Thermodynamics - First law, Second law and Introduction, definitions, Thermodynamic terms and basic concepts; Thermochemistry, Exothermic and endothermic reactions, standard enthalpy of formation, thermochemical equations; The nature of chemical equilibrium, law of mass action, equilibrium constant,  relationship between ?G and Keq, effect of temperature and pressure, Le Chatelier’s principle,, Chemical Kinetics and it Definition, reaction rate, rate laws, order reactions, molecularity of a reaction, pseudo first order reaction, half-life, Catalysis, Photochemistry and Spetrophotometry, Transmittance and absorbance, Beer-Lambert law, Properties of liquids, Acids and bases.
Laboratory Work: The laboratory section includes following experiments: Calibration of the calorimeter, determining the heat of fusion of ice, determination of specific heat of an unknown metal, determination of heat of solution and heat of neutralization, determination of second order reaction: iodination of aniline by measuring the optical density of reaction medium. 4 Credits

CHE 202

Organic Chemistry I
This course is a comprehensive introduction in fundamental aspects of biological chemistry, for freshmen students. Knowledge of structure, functionality and reactivity of the organic molecules is vital for understanding the mechanism of numerous biological processes and biochemical reactions. This course provides a foundation of organic chemistry, i.e. the understanding of structure, properties, interactions, transformations and nomenclature of organic compounds. Major topics included: Structure & Properties of the Organic Compounds & Bonding; Saturated Hydrocarbons: Alkanes and Cyclic Alkanes; Unsaturated Hydrocarbons: Alkenes & Alkynes; Introduction to Isomerism; Alkyl Halides; Introduction to Aromaticity: Benzene and its derivatives; Alcohol, Phenols & Ethers (-OH group/derivatives); Chemistry of Carbonyl (-CO-) compounds and carboxylic acid derivatives.
Laboratory Work:  The students will get practical experiences on the detection of an unknown organic compound based on their physical and chemical properties. Emphasis will be given on the nature of different laboratory solutions and how to prepare them accurately. Moreover students will also get basic idea how to detect specific organic compound present in biological sample. A number of specific organic reactions will also be demonstrated in this lab. 4 Credits  

CHE 301

Organic Chemistry II
The course starts with a review of organic functional group's structure & functions and stereochemistry. Later, the discussion will continue with the structures of small bio-molecules, e.g. carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleotides, and lipids. Next, the formation of large bio-molecules from these building blocks is described with reaction mechanisms in terms of the RNA world hypothesis.  The chemistry behind the formation and degradation of these compounds both in vitro and in vivo will be covered with emphasis on learning about complex biological systems from simpler chemical ones. The curriculum covers: carbohydrate chemistry, amino acids chemistry, lipids, lipoproteins, cholesterol and nucleic acid chemistry, introduction to bioorganic synthesis of secondary metabolites.
Laboratory Work: The organic chemistry laboratory section includes detection of different bio-molecules from various sources, determination of chemical properties of representative organic molecules, and detection of organic contents of representative biological samples. 4 Credits

 


MAJOR REQUIRED COURSES  (29 CREDITS)
MIC 302  Molecular Biology                                                               3
MIC 303  Microbial Chemistry and Metabolism                                 3                                              
MIC 304  Microbial Genetics                                                               3
MIC 305  Food Microbiology and Quality Control                             3         
MIC 306  Virology                                                                               3
MIC 307  Bacterial Pathogenesis                                                         3
MIC 422  Senior Seminar                                                                     3
With Lab                     
MIC 301  Basic Microbiology                                                              4
MIC 309  Infectious Diseases & Diagnostic Microbiology                 4

MIC 302

Molecular Biology
Molecular biology course deals with nucleic acids and proteins and how these molecules interact within the cell to promote proper growth, division, and development. It is a large and ever-changing discipline. This course will emphasize the molecular mechanisms of DNA replication, repair, transcription, protein synthesis, and gene regulation in different organisms. The topics cover in the courses are Introduction to genetics, Basic principles of Heredity, Chromosomal basis of inheritance, The chemical nature of the gene, DNA replication, RNA molecules, Transcription, Post transcriptional modification, Genetic code, Translation and Plasmid features. 3 Credits

MIC 303

Microbial Chemistry and Metabolism
Chemical structure and function of different macromolecules i.e. Proteins, Lipids, Carbohydrates and Nucleic acids; Composition and structure of prokaryotic, eukaryotic and archaeal cell organelles i.e. cell walls, cell membranes, nucleoid/nucleus, inclusion bodies, ribosomes, pigments and endospores; Elemental composition of microbial cells and their importance; Glycolysis in bacteria and archaea i.e. Embden-Meyerhof-Parans (EMP), Entner-Doudoroff (ED) and phosphoketolase pathway; Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA) Cycle, electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation; Heterotrophic metabolism of hexose and pentose sugars other than glucose; Metabolic diversity among organisms; Metabolic pathways of energy use i.e. amino acids, lipids and nucleic acids biosynthesis. 3 Credits

MIC3 04

Microbial Genetics
Microbial Genetics and Genetic Materials; Bacterial transformation: Mechanisms, transformation analysis, Mapping by transformation, Bacterial conjugation: Lederberg and Tatum’s Experimental Design, Mapping Genes by Conjugation Analysis, F' Conjugation; Bacterial transduction: Analysis of Gene Transfer in Bacteria, Specialized Transduction, Generalized versus Specialized Transduction; Gene Cloning and the Polymerase Chain Reaction: Importance, Cloning Vector; Purification of DNA from Living Cells : Preparation of Total Cell DNA, Plasmid DNA and Bacteriophage DNA; Manipulation of Purified DNA: Restriction Endonucleases and ligation;  Introduction of DNA into Living Cells : Transformation, Identification of Recombinants , Introduction of Phage DNA into Bacterial and non bacterial Cells;  Vectors for Gene Cloning: E. coli Plasmids,  M13 Bacteriophage, λ Bacteriophage; Identification of a Clone from a Gene Library: Clone Identification , The Problem of Gene Expression. 3 Credits

MIC 305

Food Microbiology and Quality Control
History and important historical developments in food microbiology; Overview of food borne pathogens and industrially important microorganisms; Factors (intrinsic and extrinsic) affecting growth of microorganisms in foods; Contamination and spoilage of foods by microorganisms. Microorganisms in food i.e. Meat and poultry products, fish and seafood products, cereal, flour and dough products and fermented food products; Methods for detection of microorganisms and/or their metabolic products in food; Food preservation techniques i.e. high temperature, low temperature, drying, radiation and modified atmosphere; Indicators of food safety and quality; Principles of quality control; Hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) system; Good manufacturing practice (GMP); Good hygiene practice (GHP); Microbiological risk assessment and management policy; Food laws and regulations. 3 Credits

MIC 306

Virology
Historical development and scope of virology; Basic concepts of viral structure; Nomenclature, classification, cultivation and detection of viruses; The virus replication cycle; Fundamentals of Bacteriophages, Viroids and Prions i.e. structure, replication cycle (lytic/and lysogenic); Pathogenesis and control of viral diseases with special focus on viral diseases of skin, respiratory system and the central nervous system; Human tumor virus i.e. Epstein-Bar virus; Mechanism of viral oncogenesis; Pathogensis and control of Human papilloma virus (HPV), Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); Host defenses against viral infection i.e. innate and adaptive immune response, interferon; Antiviral vaccines; Retroviruses as tool for Genetic Engineering. 3 Credits

MIC 307

Bacterial Pathogenesis
Principles of bacterial cell biology, including genome plasticity, mobile genetic elements, intracellular signaling, membrane biogenesis; concepts of prokaryotic cell signaling including chemotaxis/motility, cell-cell signaling (quorum sensing, biofilms); bacterial virulence strategies, such as LPS synthesis and expression of carbohydrate receptors; bacterial exploitation of host cell biology: mucosal cell entry, transcytosis, intracellular trafficking and survival, Role of bacterial community with respect to intestinal flora and health, key players of host cell defense: innate receptors, innate effectors (collectins, defensins, sIgA mucus) mechanisms of action of antibiotics and resistance mechanism, integrons, plasmids and efflux pumps, protein secretion systems, pathogenicity islands, bacterial adhesion, immune evasion strategies and novel antibiotics/phage therapy. 3 Credits

MIC 422

Senior Seminar
The objective of this course is to give students the confidence to make oral presentations before small and large audiences and to train students in basic skills in preparing and delivering audio visual presentations, including audience interaction and effective use of visual aids. Students will prepare and present on various topics throughout the semester, which will be evaluated by the faculty. They will also be expected to answer questions and tackle problems during the presentation. Through this course, students will be able to perform presentations and different types of scientific papers compatible with the world class recognized standards and formats. 3 Credits

MIC 301

Basic Microbiology
The History and Scope of Microbiology; Classification of Microorganisms: Taxonomy , Naming and Classifying Microorganisms, The Genus and the Species Concepts, The Main Classification Groups, The Study of Phylogenetic Relationships; Functional Anatomy of Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells: The structures of Prokaryotic cells, The structures of Eukaryotic cells, Comparison of both Prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell; Introduction to the Archaea: Salient Features, Extreme Environment and Extremophiles; Survey of Prokaryotic Groups with Unusual Characteristics; An Introduction to the Viruses: Novel Properties of Viruses, General Structure of Viruses, Viral Multiplication, Viroids and Prions; The Kingdom of the Fungi: General Structure, Nutrition, Reproduction; Algae: Distribution, Nutrition, Ultrasturcture, Reproduction; The Growth of Bacterial Cultures: Bacterial Division, Generation Time, Logarithmic Representation of Bacterial Populations, Phases of Bacterial Growth, Growth requirements- physical and chemical; Microscope and Microscopy: Brightfield microscopy,  Darkfield microscopy, Phase contrast microscopy, Fluorescence microscopy, Electron microscopy, Preparation and staining of specimens for microscopy; Methods of Culturing Microorganisms: Inoculation, Incubation, Isolation, Inspection and Identification of Microorganism, Types of Media, Pure Culture Techniques, Preservation of Pure Cultures
Laboratory work: Staining techniques: positive staining, negative staining, differential staining, endospore staining, flagella staining and capsule staining; Culture methods: pour plate, spread plate and streak plate methods; Presumptive Identification of Unknown Bacteria Based on their Biochemical Activities. 4 Credits

MIC 309

Infectious Diseases and Diagnostic Microbiology
Concept of infection and diseases; The spread of infections; Normal resident microflora of human body and their role; Determinants of bacterial pathogenicity and virulence; Mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis and host defenses with special focus on nosocomial and emerging infectious diseases. Detection of infectious agents of diseases by cultural, molecular and immunological methods; determining appropriate therapy for infectious agents, and processing clinical specimens for optimal recovery of infectious agents.
Laboratory work: Culture methods: Isolation, identification and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of normal flora and pathogenic microorganism from clinical specimens; (a) skin (b)throat  (c) urinary tract (d) dental caries, Spreading of the infectious agent, Isolation of enteric pathogens from stool by direct plating method. Molecular methods: Isolation of crude and purified genomic DNA from bacteria and onions, Plasmid profiling, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), Immunological methods: lipid profiling, estimation of total bilirubin concentration in blood serum, determination of blood group, HBsAg assay in patient serum sample by ELISA, Diagnosis of typhoid fever by tube dilution agglutination test (widal test). 4 Credits

ELECTIVE COURSES (9 CREDITS)
MIC 401  Immunology                                                                        3
MIC 402  Agricultural microbiology &  Plant pathology                    3                                                     
MIC 403  Microbial Biotechnology                                                     3
MIC 404  Environmental Microbiology & Bioremediation                 3                                             
MIC 405  Bioinformatics                                                                     3
MIC 406  Microbial Taxonomy                                                            3

MIC 401

Immunology
The purpose of this course is to provide a basic knowledge of immunology. This course will provide in-depth understanding the cells, molecules and organs of the immune system and how they work   together to protect us from pathogen. The principal focus of the course will be on studying structural features of the components of the immune system and their functions, innate and adaptive branches of both humoral and cellular responses of the immune system. The course will also assign emphasis on learning the major mechanisms by which immune cells protect us from different types of pathogens or from cancer cells, how immune cells detect the presence of pathogens and cancer cells, processes that lead to the elimination of pathogens. Studying the structure and function of key immune recognition molecules including antigens, antibodies, antigen receptors, MHC proteins, and cytokines are covered. The course will introduce some immunological assays to detect antigen-antibody interactions. 3 Credits

MIC 402

Agricultural Microbiology and Plant Pathology
The soil environment, Soil microbial flora, Microbial interaction, Plant -Microbe interaction: interaction with plant roots, interaction with aerial plant structures,, Animal- Microbe Interaction, Biogeochemical cycling: Carbon cycle, Nitrogen cycle, Phosphorus cycle, Sulfur cycle, Biodegradation of complex carbohydrates: Cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, Microbiology and biochemistry of nitrogen fixation, Biofertilizer technology, Biopesticides, Fungal Pathogens of Plants, Bacterial and viral plant diseases, Control of Plant diseases. 3 Credits

MIC 403

Microbial Biotechnology
Overview of Microbial Biotechnology; Bioprocess/fermentation technology: The bioreactor, Scale-up, Media design for fermentation processes, Sterilization, Downstream processing; Enzyme technology: The nature of enzymes , The application of enzymes , Production of industrial enzymes using microorganisms, methods of enzyme immobilization;  Biomining; Biotechnology and medicine: Pharmaceuticals and biopharmaceuticals, Antibiotics, Vaccines, monoclonal and recombinant antibodies, Therapeutic Hormones; Food and beverage biotechnology: Food and beverage fermentations, Microorganisms as food,  Enzymes and food processing, Amino acids, vitamins and sweeteners, Organic acids and polysaccharides; Stem cell biotechnology: The nature of stem cells, Stem cell cultivation, Human–animal embryos, Commercial potential for stem cell therapies;  Safety in biotechnology: Concepts of hazard and risk, Problems of organism pathogenicity, Problems of biologically active biotechnology products, Biowarfare and bioterrorism. 3 Credits

MIC 404

Environmental Microbiology and Bioremediation
The microbial environment; Biofilms and Microbial mats; The terrestrial environment; Freshwater and Marine environments; Culture dependent analyses of microbial communities; Culture independent microscopic analyses of microbial communities; Biodeterioration, Microorganisms and some novel pollution problems; persistence and biomagnifications of xenobiotic molecules; recalcitrant halocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS), alkyl benzyl sulfonates, synthetic polymer; Biosensors, Waste treatment technologies, Bioremediation technologies. 3 Credits            

MIC 405

Bioinformatics
The course provides a broad overview of bioinformatics and computational biology as applied to biological research. Course material will be geared towards answering specific biological questions ranging from detailed analysis of a single gene through whole-genome analysis. The course include topics: Biological Databases; BLAST and Sequence Alignment; Protein Bioinformatics; Prokaryotic & Eukaryotic Genome analysis, Human variation (SNP) analysis, Phylogenetic tree construction and plasmid (both cloning & expression vector) designing. 3 Credits

 

MIC 406

 

Microbial Taxonomy
Introduction to Diversity and Taxonomy, Origin and Diversification of life: Formation and Early History of Earth, Photosynthesis and the Oxidation of Earth, Endosymbiotic Origin of Eukaryotes; Living Fossils: DNA Records the History of Life, Molecular Phylogeny: Obtaining DNA Sequences, Sequence Alignment, Phylogenetic Trees; Microbial Evolution: The Evolutionary Process, The Evolution of Microbial Genomes; Microbial Taxonomy: Taxonomic ranks, Nomenclature rules and Identification; Classification systems; Methods of Classifying and Identifying Microorganisms: phenotypics methods, Genotypics methods; Divisions of Life; Classification of bacteria based on Bergey’s manual. 3 Credits

 

FREE ELECTIVE COURSES                               (9 CREDITS)

 

Department of Environmental Science and Management

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Management

Revised Curriculum (120 credits)

University General Education Courses (37 credits)

Languages

12 credits

ENG 102: English Composition
ENG 103: Intermediate Composition
ENG 105: Advanced Composition

6

ENG 111: Public Speaking

3

ENG 115: Literature

3

Humanities

9 credits

PHI 101: Introduction to Philosophy
ENV 315: Environmental Ethics

3

HIS 101: Bangladesh History and Culture
HIS 102: Introduction to World Civilization
HIS 205: World History

6

Social Sciences

9 credits

POL 101: Introduction to Political Science
POL 104: Introduction to Governance

3

ECO 101: Introduction to Microeconomics
ECO 104: Introduction to Macroeconomics

3

SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology
ENV203/GEO205: Introduction to Bangladesh Geography
ANT 101: Introduction to Anthropology

3

Computer and Math Skills

3 credits

MIS 105: Introduction to Computers

3

MAT 112: College Algebra
MAT 116: Pre-Calculus

3

MAT 120: Calculus I

3

STA 172: Introduction to Statistics

3

Sciences (with lab)

4 credits

BIO 103: Biology I

4

CHE 101: General Chemistry

4

ENV 107: Introduction to Environmental Science

4

 

 

School Curriculum - Management

35 credits

MAT 120:  Calculus I

3

STA 172: Introduction to Statistics

3

CHE 101; General Chemistry

4

BIO 101: Biology I

4

ECO 104: Introduction to Macroeconomics

3

ENV260/ECO 260: Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

3

MGT 210: Organizational Management

3

ENV 375: Biostatistics

3

MGT 314: Operations and Supply Chain Management

3

MIS 105: Introduction to Computers

3

MGT 489: Strategic Management

3

Major Requirements - Management

39 credits

Major Required Courses

30

Major Elective Courses

9

Free Elective

9 credits

Free Elective Courses

9

Total: 37+35+39+9

120 credits

     Major Required Courses

Course Code & Title

Credit

ENV 205: Climate Change

3

ENV 207: Environmental Health and Management

3

ENV 208: Environmental Hazard and Disaster Management

3

ENV 313: Biodiversity and Conservation

4

ENV 316: Geographic Information System

3

ENV 354: Environmental Economics

3

ENV 373: Environmental Impact Assessment and Monitoring

3

ENV 409: Environmental Policy, Planning and Politics

3

ENV 410: Integrated Natural Resource Management

3

ENV 455: Research Methods and Seminar
ENV 498: Internship

2
0

Total

30

                 
                 Major Elective Courses (Any three courses)

Course Code & Title

Credit

 

 

ENV 307: Urban Environmental Management

3

ENV 321: Environmental Entrepreneurship and Organizations

3

ENV 372: Techniques of Environmental Valuation

3

ENV 408: Environmental Pollution Control

3

ENV 412: Coastal Zone Management

3

ENV 418: Conservation and Sustainable Development

3

ENV 433: Industrial Ecology

3

Total

9

Course Descriptions

University General Education Courses (37 credits)

Please see General Education (GE) Requirements: The Courses on Page 34

 

School Curriculum – Management

  • Survey of Calculus (Calculus I)
  • Statistics I
  • General Chemistry I
  • Biology I
  • Principle of Macroeconomics
  • Environmental Economics
  • Organizational Management
  • Statistics II (Biostatistics)
  • Operation and Supply Chain Management
  • Computer and Information Systems
  • Strategic Management

MAT 120

Calculus I:
Covers basic calculus and analytic geometry. Coordinates, Graphs and Lines; Functions and Limits; Differentiations; Application of Differentiation; Integration; Logarithmic and Exponential Functions. Prerequisite: MAT116. 3 Credits.

STA 172

Introduction to Statistics
Statistics and its application; variables and attributes; classification and tabulation of data; populations and samples; frequency distributions; graphical presentation of data; statistical averages; measures of dispersion; linear regression and correlation; basic probability; random experiments; index numbers time series and components of time series; moving averages and seasonal indices. 3 Credits

CHE 101

General Chemistry
For students having basic knowledge of Chemistry: Introduction to atomic structure, quantum mechanical atom, chemical bonding, valence shell electron pair repulsion theory for predicting molecular geometry. Their theory of chemical bond formation, Periodic table and period classification of elements with their properties, Transition elements and coordination chemistry, application of valence bond theory to coordination compounds, Chemistry of solids and crystals, States of matter, Different gas laws & kinetic theory of gases, stoichiometry, chemical equilibrium, environmental chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry in HSC.  4 Credits.


BIO 103

Biology I
This course is an introduction to the basic principles of modern biology and their relevance to human life. Students in the BBA or other programs likely will come from widely differing backgrounds, like science, commerce, and humanities or arts. Therefore, specific emphasis will be placed upon the understanding of basic biological concepts and terminology in the field of biology. The major part of the course is intended to provide students, especially non-science students, with background knowledge in the disciplines of ecology, physiology, nutrition, human organ systems, medical microbiology, and biotechnology. This background knowledge is intended to provide non-biological science students with a basic foundation in biology that will be helpful for their professional position in diverse arena. The biology course has the following objectives: i) to introduce students to the nature, history of biological science, and scope of studying biology; ii) to introduce students to biological science, emphasizing the relationships of humans to the environment, taxonomy, diversification of life, ecology, and environmental concerns; iii) to emphasize cell chemistry, cell structure, cell physiology, cell processes to include respiration and photosynthesis, cell reproduction and genetics; iv) to provide students with a basic knowledge in nutrition; v) to provide students with a general introduction to anatomy and physiology of human digestive, respiratory, circulatory and excretory systems; vi) to emphasize blood composition, function of blood, blood grouping, and blood diseases; and vii) to provide students with a general introduction to infectious disease, microbial mechanism of pathogenicity, disease transmission, and host defence system. 4 Credits

ECO 104

Introduction to Macroeconomics
This course introduces the principles of macroeconomic analysis, its analytical methods with current institutional and empirical issues. Topics include different methods of national income accounting with special emphasis on Bangladesh Economy; issues relating to unemployment, inflation; determination of output, price level, money and banking. It also gives an introductory account of the monetary and fiscal policies; budget and trade deficits; and exchange rate.  3 Credits

ENV 260/ECO 260

Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
Economists’ articulation of environmental problems; natural resource classifications; theory of externality;  relationship between nature and environment; relationship between economic development and environmental degradation; economic instruments for environmental protection and natural resource management; economics of deforestation; biodiversity conservation; and poverty-environment nexus. Pre-requisite: ECO101/ECO 103. 3 Credits

MGT 210

Organizational Management
Organizational Management discusses the methods and concepts of managing a staff, business or organization. Students learn to apply, identify and evaluate functions for private and public organizations and their business structures. Introductory courses on organizational management allow students to practice their critical thinking, continuous learning and creative thinking skills in a management environment. 3 Credits

ENV 375

Biostatistics
Review of techniques of summarizing statistical data; frequency distribution and basic probability concepts; hypothesis testing; correlation and regression; sampling techniques; different types of field designs in sampling techniques; analysis of variance and Ducan’s multiple range test; simple tests of significance - chi square tests; probit analysis. Pre-requisite: ENV 102 & STA 172. 3 Credits

MGT 314

Operations and Supply Chain Management
Study of the process directly related to the creation and distribution of goods and services. Increasingly, these operations are taking place outside the boundaries of a traditional enterprise. This course teaches students how to analyze processes, ensure quality, create value and manage the flow of information, products and services across a network of customers, enterprises and supply chain partners. Pre Requisite: MGT 210, MKT 202. 3 Credits

MIS 105

Introduction to Computers
Provides a general understanding of computer applications and functions of the components of a computer system. Topics include components of computer systems; concepts of software; introduction to operating systems; history of computer languages; programming fundamentals; basics such as constant, variables, data type, operators and expressions, pointer; concepts of database; internet technology and World Wide Web. Course is conducted in a lab setting and provides functional orientation to word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database and Web Pagedesign. Students also learn some basic skills in searching and evaluating online resources.  3 Credits

MGT 489

Strategic Management
Analysis of policy formulation and implementation from a companywide standpoint; emphasis on integration of knowledge and approaches across functional areas; techniques of strategy formulation and implementation by single-business, diversified and multinational firms.  Prereq: 80 credits. 3 Credits

Major Requirements – Management

Major Required Courses

 

ENV 205

 

Climate Change
Earth as a system including major components; meteorology; science of climate change; regional climate pattern and extreme climatic event; sectors to be affected due to climate change ecosystem and biodiversity; agriculture; water resources;  sea level change; health; present climate change trend and future prediction: climate modeling; general circulation model; global effort to climate change: IPCC; UNFCCC; Kyoto Protocol; climate change and Bangladesh: historical trend; future projection; most vulnerable sectors; adaptation to climate change in different sectors in Bangladesh. 3 Credits

ENV 207

Environmental Health and Management
Environmental hazards such as environmental pathogens, their growth and transmission through air, water and soil that threaten human health and activities; the epidemiology and natural history of infectious and non-infectious diseases, including integrated vector control and host resistance; sewerage and sanitation microbiology; industrial pollution; effect of chemical fertilizer and pesticide usage; mental health; public health; institutional support for hazard assessment and disaster preparedness.  Recommended: ENV 107. 3 Credits

ENV 208

Environmental Hazards and Disaster Management
Definition of hazard; risk and disaster; sources and types of disaster; global trend in disaster occurrence; disaster management approaches; risk assessment and quantification: risk perception and communication; risk indices; adjustment to hazard; climate change and its impact on some selected disasters; social, economic and political aspects of disaster management; community based disaster management; disaster management approaches in Bangladesh. 3 Credits


ENV 313

Biodiversity and Conservation
Relationship between humans and the global biotic environment; concepts of biological variety and classifications; sustainability of the planet; human impacts on biodiversity; methods to manage natural areas; conservation measures; (Field trip: depending on the instructor), Pre-requisite: ENV 102 and ENV 103. 4 Credits

ENV 316

Geographic Information System
Introduction to remote sensing; image interpretation; processing and analysis using raster based GIS software; introduction to GIS and the state of GIS in environmental research and problem solving; applications of GIS; GIS and environmental modeling; introduction to cartography and maps; map interpretation; use and misuse of maps; land use concepts instrumentation and training on data acquisition; processing; manipulation; analysis and product generation using vector based GIS software; research paper. 3 Credits

ENV 354

Environmental Economics
Market failure; externality and economics of pollution control; pollution control policies and their implications for efficiency; equity and growth; resource taxonomy; limits to growth; theory of optimal use and depletion of renewable; non-renewable and recyclable resources in the context of water; forest; fisheries; and mineral resources; property right regimes (public, private and common property ownership) as a means of resource management. Pre-requisite: ECO/ENV 260. 3 Credits

ENV 373

Environmental Impact Assessment and Monitoring
Concepts of environmental and social impact assessment; project cycle, scoping, initial environmental examination (IEE) and environmental impact assessment (EIA); methods of impact identification – matrix, network and checklist methods, modeling and simulation; environmental indices and indicators for air, water, land and biota; prediction and assessment of impacts on different environmental media; assessment of visual impacts, social impacts and cultural impacts; decision methods for evaluation of alternatives – weighting, scaling, rating and ranking of alternatives, decision matrix; people’s participation; mitigation measures; environmental monitoring; preparation of TOR for an EIA, EIA Report. 3 Credits

ENV 409

Environmental Policy, Planning and Politics
Approaches to environmental policy-making and planning; differences in policy planning in industrialized countries and developing world; uses of case studies; protection and restoration of natural systems; the maintenance and enhancements of quality of life; grounding environmental thought and values among planners and policymakers. 3 Credits

ENV 410

Integrated Natural Resource Management
An overview of global water resource availability and crisis; integrated water resources planning and management; review of hydrology and fluid mechanics; natural water resources system; water resources system of Bangladesh; extreme water events; flood protection (structural vs. non-structural measures); climate change and water resources; water resources system modeling; water and poverty; livelihood relation. 3 Credits

ENV 455

Research Methods and Seminar
Purpose and methods of scientific research; features; scopes and limitations of research; classification of scientific research; overview of data types and sources; techniques of sampling; data collection and data analysis; biases in data collection; review of analytical tools/software available to researchers; literature review; preparation and presentation of research proposal and report. 2 Credits

ENV 498

Internship. Non-credit Course (NCR)


Major Elective Courses

 

ENV 307

Urban Environmental Management
Urban growth components; urbanization and economic development; demographic; economic; market forces; urban carrying capacity and ecological resources; urban planning; urban management and environmental management paradigms; management of solid waste; wastewater; transport and air pollution; urban poverty and the informal sector; economic and financial considerations in urban environmental management; decentralized urban system as a strategy for urbanization’s sustainability. 3 Credits

ENV 321

Environmental Entrepreneurship and Organizations
The nature; composition; structure; mandate and role of community level; national; regional and global organizations dedicated to environmental work; special attention to UN environmental organizations such as UNEP; GEF; etc.; relationship between national and global environmental organizations; national; regional and global environmental policy and conflict. 3 Credits

ENV 372

Techniques of Environmental Valuation
Market aspects of environmental goods and services; quantifying the value of environmental goods and services; market based techniques of cost-benefit analysis; selection of environmental projects; investment criteria; financial flow in environmental projects; flaws of market valuation techniques; non-market valuation techniques; contingent valuation; choice modeling; hedonics/property value method; travel cost method and benefit transfer. Pre-requisite: ECO 260. 3 Credits

ENV 408

Environmental Pollution Control
Cause and effect of water; air; soil and noise pollution; hazardous substances and risk analysis; pollution sampling and measurement techniques; control methods for air, water and land pollution;  basic concept and design of  Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP) for industries: state of pollution and control measures in Bangladesh; field trip: depending on the instructor.  Pre-requisite: ENV 208. 3 Credits

ENV 412

Coastal Zone Management
Definitions and processes; Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM), fundamentals of coastal processes; coastal resources and ecosystem; wetlands; forestry and mangrove ecosystem; coral reefs; agriculture and fisheries; mining; human activities and their impact on coastal environments; introduction to Bangladesh coast; development activities; socio-economic aspects: natural hazards and vulnerability level; climate change and its effect on coastal region; Bangladesh National Coastal Zone Management policy. 3 Credits

ENV 418

Conservation and Sustainable Development
Issues in conservation and sustainable development; the many roads to conservation; environment and sustainable development; indigenous peoples as conservationists; the theory and practice of sustainable development; conservation and self-interest; reconciliation of conservation and development conflicts; case studies on conservation and sustainable development. 3 Credits

ENV 433

Industrial Ecology
Fundamentals of Industrial Ecology; Sustainability and its dimensions; History of Industrial Ecology; Material and Energy consumption in context of industrial ecology; Material Flow Analysis (MFA) and Substance Flow Analysis (SFA); Life Cycle Assessment (LCA); Emerging concepts of Industrial Ecology; Industrial Ecology: Bangladesh perspective. 3 Credits

 

Free Electives

9 Credits

 

 

 

 


Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science

Revised Curriculum (120 credits)

University General Education Courses  (37 credits)

Languages                                                                                                      12 credits                                                        

ENG 102: English Composition
ENG 103: Intermediate Composition
ENG 105: Advanced Composition

6

ENG 111: Public Speaking

3

ENG 115: Literature

3

Humanities

9 credits

PHI 101: Introduction to Philosophy
ENV 315: Environmental Ethics

3

HIS 101: Bangladesh History and Culture
HIS 102: Introduction to World Civilization
HIS 205: World History

6

Social Sciences

9 credits

POL 101: Introduction to Political Science
POL 104: Introduction to Governance

3

ECO 101: Introduction to Microeconomics
ECO 104: Introduction to Macroeconomics

3

SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology
ENV203/GEO205: Introduction to Bangladesh Geography
ANT 101: Introduction to Anthropology

3

Computer and Math Skills

3 credits

MIS 105: Introduction to Computers

3

MAT 112: College Algebra
MAT 116: Pre-Calculus

3

MAT 120: Calculus I

3

STA 172: Introduction to Statistics

3

Sciences (with lab)

4 credits

BIO 103: Biology I

4

CHE 101: General Chemistry

4

ENV 107: Introduction to Environmental Science

4

 

 

School Curriculum – Science

36 credits

MAT 112:College Algebra

3

MAT 116: Pre-Calculus
MAT 120: Calculus I

3

STA 172: Introduction to Statistics

3

ENV 375: Biostatistics

3

With Lab

 

BIO 103: Biology I

4

BIO 201: Biology II

4

CHE 101: General Chemistry

4

CHE 201: General Chemistry II

4

CHE 202: Organic  Chemistry I

4

CHE 301: Organic  Chemistry II

4

Major Requirements - Sciences

38 credits

Major Required Courses

29

Major Elective Courses

9

Free Electives

9 credits

Free Elective Courses

9

Total: 37+36+38+9

120 credits

Major Required Courses

Course Code & Title

Credits

ENV 204: Soil and Environment

3

ENV 205: Climate Change

3

ENV 207: Environmental Health and Management

3

ENV 215: Ecology
ENV 316: Geographic Information System

3
3

ENV 373: Environmental Impact Assessment and Monitoring

3

ENV 408: Environmental Pollution Control

3

ENV 409: Environmental Policy, Planning and Politics

3

ENV 410: Integrated Natural Resource Management

3

ENV 455: Research Methods and Seminar
ENV 498: Internship

2
0

Total

29

                 Major Elective Courses (Any three courses)


Course Code & Title

Credits

ENV 301: Sustainable Energy

3

ENV 305: Water Supply and Treatment

3

ENV 311: Geology and Geomorphology

3

ENV 401: Sustainable Agriculture

3

ENV 402: Environmental Modeling

3

ENV 412: Coastal Zone Management

3

ENV 414: Waste Management

3

Total

9

 

 

 

 

Course Descriptions

University General Education Courses (37 credits)

Please see General Education Requirements: The Courses on page 34

School Curriculum – Science

  • College Algebra/Pre-Calculus
  • Survey of Calculus (Calculus)
  • Statistics I
  • Statistics II (Biostatistics)

With Lab

  • Biology I
  • Biology II
  • General Chemistry I
  • General Chemistry II
  • Organic Chemistry I
  • Organic Chemistry II

 

MAT 112

College Algebra
Fundamentals of Algebra: Real Numbers, Fundamentals of Algebra: Exponents, Polynomials, Fundamentals of Algebra: Factoring, Rational expressions, Radicals, Linear equations, Formulas and Applications, Quadratic equations, Other types of Equations, Inequalities, Cartesian Co-ordinate systems, Graphing Relations, Functions, Linear Functions, Equations of a line, Symmetry, Algebra of Functions, Inverse Functions, Quadratic Functions, Synthetic Division, Exponential Functions, Logarithmic Functions, Equations on Exponential and Logarithmic functions, Systems of Equations, Systems of Inequalities; Linear Programming, Matrix Solution of Linear Systems, Properties of Matrices, Determinants, Cramer’s rule, Matrix Inverse. Pre-requisite –High School Mathematics. 0 Credit.

MAT 116

Precalculus
Behavior of functions in some depth including properties, graphs, inverses, transformations, and compositions. This course pays particular attention to linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. It covers trigonometric functions and inverse trigonometric functions as well. Pre-requisite –High School Mathematics. 0 Credit.

 

MAT 120

Calculus I
Covers basic calculus and analytic geometry. Coordinates, Graphs and Lines; Functions and Limits; Differentiations; Application of Differentiation; Integration; Logarithmic and Exponential Functions.  Prerequisite: MAT 116. 3 Credits

 

STA 172

Introduction to Statistics
Statistics and its application. Variables and Attributes. Classification and tabulation of data. Populations and samples. Frequency distributions. Graphical presentation of data. Describing and summarizing data: statistical averages, measures of dispersion and shape characteristics. Linear regression and correlation. Basic probability: random experiments, events, definitions of probability, permutation and combinations, probability rules, random variables and expectations, binomial and normal distributions. Index numbers: types of indices, problems involved in the construction of index number, consumer price index and its uses. Time series: components of a time series, moving averages and seasonal indices. 3 Credits

ENV 375

Biostatistics
Review of techniques of summarizing statistical data, frequency distribution and basic probability concepts. Hypothesis testing; correlation and regression; sampling techniques; different types of field designs in sampling techniques; analysis of variance and Ducan’s multiple range test; simple tests of significance – chi square tests, probit analysis. Pre-requisite: ENV 102 & STA 172. 3 Credits


BIO 103

Biology I
This course is an introduction to the basic principles of modern biology and their relevance to human life. Students in the BBA or other programs likely will come from widely differing backgrounds, like science, commerce, and humanities or arts. Therefore, specific emphasis will be placed upon the understanding of basic biological concepts and terminology in the field of biology. The major part of the course is intended to provide students, especially non-science students, with background knowledge in the disciplines of ecology, physiology, nutrition, human organ systems, medical microbiology, and biotechnology. This background knowledge is intended to provide non-biological science students with a basic foundation in biology that will be helpful for their professional position in diverse arena. The biology course has the following objectives: i) to introduce students to the nature, history of biological science, and scope of studying biology; ii) to introduce students to biological science, emphasizing the relationships of humans to the environment, taxonomy, diversification of life, ecology, and environmental concerns; iii) to emphasize cell chemistry, cell structure, cell physiology, cell processes to include respiration and photosynthesis, cell reproduction and genetics; iv) to provide students with a basic knowledge in nutrition; v) to provide students with a general introduction to anatomy and physiology of human digestive, respiratory, circulatory and excretory systems; vi) to emphasize blood composition, function of blood, blood grouping, and blood diseases; and vii) to provide students with a general introduction to infectious disease, microbial mechanism of pathogen city, disease transmission, and host defense system. 4 Credits

 

 

BIO 201

 

Biology II
This course introduces history, scope and future of Biochemistry and biotechnology. Students learn the basic logics of living organisms, the role of bio-molecules and their interrelationship. The course provides following introductory concepts: i) define and explain the basic concepts in biochemistry; ii) various biochemical pathways; iii) define the biological macromolecules and their subunits; iv) basic applied concepts in biochemistry to biotechnology; v) explain the underlying concepts in biotechnology; and vi) relate the biochemical properties and their principles as tools of biotechnology.
Laboratory work: Main objective of the laboratory section is to bring experience in solving practical problems in biochemistry laboratory, to acquire applicable skills and to teach students to derive conclusions from experiments. Biochemistry part also demonstrates methods of clinical biochemistry and their significance for diagnosis of diseases. 4 Credits

CHE 101

General Chemistry
Principles governing atomic structure, bonding, states of matter, stoichiometry and chemical equilibrium, chemistry of solids and crystals, descriptive chemistry of the elements and coordination compounds, environmental chemistry, chemistry of materials, including organic and inorganic biological substances, chemical nergetic and equilibrium, chemical kinetics. 4 Credits


CHE 201

General Chemistry II
Thermodynamics – First law, Second law and Introduction, definitions, Thermodynamic terms and basic concepts; Thermochemistry, Exothermic and endothermic reactions, standard enthalpy of formation, thermochemical equations; The nature of chemical equilibrium, law of mass action, equilibrium constant,  relationship between ?G and Keq, effect of temperature and pressure, Le Chatelier’s principle,, Chemical Kinetics and it Definition, reaction rate, rate laws, order reactions, molecularity of a reaction, pseudo first order reaction, half-life, Catalysis, Photochemistry and Spetrophotometry, Transmittance and absorbance, Beer-Lambert law, Properties of liquids, Acids and bases.
Laboratory Work: The laboratory section includes following experiments: Calibration of the calorimeter, determining the heat of fusion of ice, determination of specific heat of an unknown metal, determination of heat of solution and heat of neutralization, determination of second order reaction: iodination of aniline by measuring the optical density of reaction medium. 4 Credits

 

CHE 202

 

Organic Chemistry I
This course is a comprehensive introduction in fundamental aspects of biological chemistry, for freshmen students. Knowledge of structure, functionality and reactivity of the organic molecules is vital for understanding the mechanism of numerous biological processes and biochemical reactions. This course provides a foundation of organic chemistry, i.e. the understanding of structure, properties, interactions, transformations and nomenclature of organic compounds. Major topics included: Structure & Properties of the Organic Compounds & Bonding; Saturated Hydrocarbons: Alkanes and Cyclic Alkanes; Unsaturated Hydrocarbons: Alkenes & Alkynes; Introduction to Isomerism; Alkyl Halides; Introduction to Aromaticity: Benzene and its derivatives; Alcohol, Phenols & Ethers (-OH group/derivatives); Chemistry of Carbonyl (-CO-) compounds and carboxylic acid derivatives.
Laboratory Work:  The students will get practical experiences on the detection of an unknown organic compound based on their physical and chemical properties. Emphasis will be given on the nature of different laboratory solutions and how to prepare them accurately. Moreover students will also get basic idea how to detect specific organic compound present in biological sample. A number of specific organic reactions will also be demonstrated in this lab. 4 Credits

CHE 301

Organic Chemistry II           
The course starts with a review of organic functional group’s structure & functions and stereochemistry. Later, the discussion will continue with the structures of small bio-molecules, e.g. carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleotides, and lipids. Next, the formation of large bio-molecules from these building blocks is described with reaction mechanisms in terms of the RNA world hypothesis.  The chemistry behind the formation and degradation of these compounds both in vitro and in vivo will be covered with emphasis on learning about complex biological systems from simpler chemical ones. The curriculum covers: carbohydrate chemistry, amino acids chemistry, lipids, lipoproteins, cholesterol and nucleic acid chemistry, introduction to bioorganic synthesis of secondary metabolites.
Laboratory Work: The organic chemistry laboratory section includes detection of different bio-molecules from various sources, determination of chemical properties of representative organic molecules, and detection of organic contents of representative biological samples. 4 Credits

 

Major Requirement – Sciences

Major Required Courses

ENV 204

Soil and Environment
Environment and evaluation; geology; geomorphology; and pedology; factors and process of soil formation; world soils of high; mid; cool; warm and low latitudes; chemical composition of soil; primary and secondary minerals; soil as medium of plant growth; essential elements required in plant nutrition; soil-plant-water relationships; soil and fertilizer management; organisms composing soil population; general ecology; bio-fertilizers and organic farming; physical aspects of soil science; soil erosion; land degradation and management; problem soils in Bangladesh and their management;  (Field trip: depending on the instructor). 3 Credits

ENV 205

Climate Change
Earth as a system including major components; meteorology; science of climate change; regional climate pattern and extreme climatic event; sectors to be affected due to climate change ecosystem and biodiversity; agriculture; water resources;  sea level rise; health; present climate change trend and future prediction: climate modeling; general circulation model; global effort to climate change: IPCC; UNFCCC; Kyoto Protocol; climate change and Bangladesh: historical trend; future projection; most vulnerable sectors; adaptation to climate change in different sectors in Bangladesh. 3 Credits

 

ENV 207

Environmental Health and Management
Environmental hazards such as environmental pathogens, their growth and transmission through air, water and soil that threaten human health and activities; the epidemiology and natural history of infectious and non-infectious diseases, including integrated vector control and host resistance; sewerage and sanitation microbiology; industrial pollution; effect of chemical fertilizer and pesticide usage; mental health; public health; institutional support for hazard assessment and disaster preparedness.  Recommended: ENV 107. 3 Credits

ENV 215

Ecology
Ecological concepts; their applications in the assessment; conservation; and management of ecological systems including vegetation; wildlife; fisheries; pest and whole ecosystems; description of major attributes and processes at the individual and community levels; characteristics of major ecosystems (terrestrial; freshwater and marine); ecosystem of Surdorbons, St. martins island; basic techniques of research design; survey and sampling; critical analysis of ecological reports using selected case studies; (Field trip: depending on the instructor). 3 Credits

ENV 316

Geographic Information System
Introduction to remote sensing; image interpretation; processing and analysis using raster based GIS software; introduction to GIS and the state of GIS in environmental research and problem solving; applications of GIS; GIS and environmental modeling; introduction to cartography and maps; map interpretation; use and misuse of maps; land use concepts instrumentation and training on data acquisition; processing; manipulation; analysis and product generation using vector based GIS software; research paper. 3 Credits

ENV 373

Environmental Impact Assessment and Monitoring
Concepts of environmental and social impact assessment; project cycle, scoping, initial environmental examination (IEE) and environmental impact assessment (EIA); methods of impact identification – matrix, network and checklist methods, modeling and simulation; environmental indices and indicators for air, water, land and biota; prediction and assessment of impacts on different environmental media; assessment of visual impacts, social impacts and cultural impacts; decision methods for evaluation of alternatives – weighting, scaling, rating and ranking of alternatives, decision matrix; people’s participation; mitigation measures; environmental monitoring; preparation of TOR for an EIA, EIA Report. 3 Credits

ENV 408

Environment Pollution Control
Cause and effect of water; air; soil and noise pollution; hazardous substances and risk analysis; pollution sampling and measurement techniques; control methods for air, water and land pollution;  basic concept and design of  Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP) for industries: state of pollution and control measures in Bangladesh; field trip: depending on the instructor.  Prerequisite: ENV 208. 3 Credits

ENV 409

Environmental Policy, Planning and Politics
Approaches to environmental policy-making and planning; differences in policy planning in industrialized countries and developing world; uses of case studies; protection and restoration of natural systems; the maintenance and enhancements of quality of life; grounding environmental thought and values among planners and policymakers. 3 Credits

ENV 410

Integrated Natural Resource Management
An overview of global water resource availability and crisis; integrated water resources planning and management; review of hydrology and fluid mechanics; natural water resources system; water resources system of Bangladesh; extreme water events; flood protection (structural vs. non-structural measures); climate change and water resources; water resources system modeling; water and poverty; livelihood relation. 3 Credits

ENV 455

Research Methods and Seminar
Purpose and methods of scientific research; features; scopes and limitations of research; classification of scientific research; overview of data types and sources; techniques of sampling; data collection and data analysis; biases in data collection; review of analytical tools/software available to researchers; literature review; preparation and presentation of research proposal and report. 2 Credits

ENV 498

Internship. Non-credit Course (NCR)

Major Elective Courses

ENV 301

Sustainable Energy
Introduction to energy, definition of terms and concepts; renewable energy, biomass, bioenergy, biofuels, biopower, fossil fuels, and energy units. Biofuels and bioenergy; different generation of biofuels, energy crops, fuel cell systems and technologies, geothermal energy, hydropower, solar energy, wind and tidal power. Fossil fuels and related environmental problems. Renewable energy implications for Bangladesh. General principles of the carbon cycle, greenhouse effect and global climate change - past, present and future including adaptation and mitigation techniques. Sustainable energy feedstocks, Carbon neutrality, carbon sequestration and energy technologies including production, conversion, storage, life cycle and energy efficiency assessments.  Environmental benefits from bioenergy. Biorefineries and bio products. Bioeconomy strategies. Field excursion and laboratory studies. 3 Credits

ENV 305

Water Supply and Treatment
Water sources and their development; water distribution and wastewater collection systems; including applied hydraulics of pipelines and pumps; physical; chemical and biological treatment of water and waste-water; regulatory requirements on water quality parameters; laboratory techniques related to water quality analysis; field trip may be required for the course depending on the instructor. 3 Credits

ENV 311

Geology and Geomorphology
Rocks and minerals: identification of rocks and minerals; common rock forming minerals; cycle of rock change;  structural geology: type of faults; fold and fold type; erosional process; analysis of erosional land forms; geology of Bangladesh;   fluvial processes in geomorphology: valley shape; stream terraces; alluvial flood plains; deltas and alluvial fans; river basin; floodplain, morphology, wetlands; geomorphologic characteristics of rivers of Bangladesh; field trip may require for the course depending on the instructor. 3 Credits

 

ENV 401

Sustainable Agriculture
Agriculture and its sub-sectors – crop, livestock, fisheries, forestry; farming practices; integration of farming sub-sectors in the farming system; current and future technology needs and their applications; modern biotechnology in agriculture; agricultural inputs use and sustainable environmental development; land use planning and zoning of agricultural production systems; income generation and off farm activities; management of agricultural vulnerability in agriculture; field trip may require for the course depending on the instructor. 3 Credits

ENV 402

Environmental Modeling
Modeling concepts; conceptualization; data collection and processing; calibration; simulation and optimization; projects on modeling of biotic and abiotic components and processes of the environment. 3 Credits

ENV 412

Coastal Zone Management
Definitions and processes; Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM), fundamentals of coastal processes; coastal resources and ecosystem; wetlands; forestry and mangrove ecosystem; coral reefs; agriculture and fisheries; mining; human activities and their impact on coastal environments; introduction to Bangladesh coast; development activities; socio-economic aspects: natural hazards and vulnerability level; climate change and its effect on coastal region; Bangladesh National Coastal Zone Management policy. 3 Credits


ENV 414

Waste Management
Global view of waste management industry and how waste is defined from technical; economic and social perspectives; gaseous; liquid and solid wastes in Bangladesh and the region; urban waste, waste management in Bangladesh; institutional and legal frameworks of waste management at the national; state and local government levels; social and economic aspects of waste; concepts 3 Rs treatment; biotechnological approaches and disposal options. 3 Credits


 

 

Free Elective Courses

 

9 Credits

Department of Pharmaceutical Science

Bachelor of Professional Pharmacy (B. Pharm.)
(Revised proposal, 2015; subject to revision)
 



Curriculum Overview
The Bachelor of Pharmacy Professional (B. Pharm. Professional) is a 180 credit undergraduate program run by the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences. A student will complete the following types of courses:

Category

Contents

Remarks

General Education /
University Core

Languages, Art, Music, Theatre or Performing Arts, Social Sciences, Computer, Mathematics, and Sciences

Courses are offered centrally by the university. Students are expected to complete these courses within the first six semesters (four months/semester).
Details of these courses are available in the common undergraduate syllabus of the university and are not included in this syllabus.

Science /
School Curriculum

Biology, Chemistry, Calculus and Statistics

Courses are offered by the School of Health and Life Sciences. Students are expected to complete these courses within the first six semesters (four months/semester). Details of these courses are available in the common undergraduate syllabus of the school and are not included in this syllabus.

 

Major/
Dept. Curriculum

Pharmaceutical Sciences

Courses are offered by the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Students are expected to start these courses after completing all University Curriculum courses and School Curriculum courses.
Semester duration will be six months.
In addition to Major (Compulsory) courses, students should take any three from the list of Major (Elective) Courses.

Free Electives

 

Students will take any three courses as free elective courses.

Total

 

180 Credits

Categories of Courses

 

UNIVERSITY General Education Courses

 

(37 Credits)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Languages

 

(12 Credits)

 

 

ENG 102

Introduction to Composition

 

3

 

 

ENG 103

Intermediate Composition

 

3

 

 

ENG 111

Public Speaking

 

3

 

 

ENG 115

English Literature

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Humanities

 

(9 Credits)

 

 

PHI 101/PHI 104

Introduction to Philosophy/Ethics

 

3

 

 

HIS 101

Bangladesh History and Culture

 

3

 

 

HIS 102

Introduction to World Civilization

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Social Sciences

 

(9 Credits)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

POL 101/POL 104

Introduction to Political Science/ Introduction to Governance

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ECO 101/ECO 104

Introduction to Microeconomics/Introduction to Macroeconomics

 

3

 

 

SOC 101/GEO 205/
ANT 101

Introduction to Sociology/

 

3

 

 

 

Introduction to Bangladesh Geography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Computer and Math Skills

 

 

 

 

(3 Credits)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MIS 105

Introduction to Computers

 

3

 

 

STA 172

Introduction to Statistics

In SHLS core

3

 

 

Sciences (with lab)

 

(4 Credits)

 

 

PHY 107L

Physics I

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SCHOOL OF HEALTH & LIFE SCIENCES (SHLS) CORE  

 

(33Credits)

 

 

 

 

 

 

STA 172

Introduction to Statistics

 

3

 

 

MAT 120

Calculus I

 

3

 

 

BBT 203

Statistics II (Biostatistics)

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With Lab:

 

 

 

 

 

BIO 103/PHR 121

Biology I/Human Physiology I

 

4

 

 

BIO 201/ PHR 213

Biology II/Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

 

4

 

 

CHE 101/PHR 123

General Chemistry I/Physical Pharmacy I

 

4

 

 

CHE 201/PHR 210

General Chemistry II/ Physical Pharmacy II

 

4

 

 

CHE 202/PHR 114

Organic Chemistry I/ Organic Pharmacy I

 

4

 

 

CHE 301/PHR 122

Organic Chemistry II/ Organic Pharmacy II

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

 

101 Credits

 

 

CORE COURSES (required)                                                                  

 

(92 Credits)

 

 

PHR 110

Introduction to Pharmacy

 

2

 

 

PHR 113

Pharmacognosy

 

3

 

 

PHR 115

Pharmaceutical Calculations

 

2

 

 

PHR 120

Inorganic Pharmacy

 

3

 

 

PHR 120L

Inorganic Pharmacy Lab

 

1

 

 

PHR 124

Pharmaceutical Microbiology

 

3

 

 

PHR 124L

Pharmaceutical Microbiology Lab

 

1

 

 

PHR 211

Human Physiology II

 

3

 

 

PHR 212

Pharmaceutical Technology I

 

3

 

 

PHR 212L

Pharmaceutical Technology  Lab I

 

1

 

 

PHR 214

Pharmacology I

 

3

 

 

PHR 214L

Pharmacology Lab I

 

1

 

 

PHR 215

Medicinal Chemistry I

 

3

 

 

PHR 215L

Medicinal Chemistry Lab

 

1

 

 

PHR 221

Pharmaceutical Technology II

 

3

 

 

PHR 221L

Pharmaceutical Technology Lab II

 

1

 

 

PHR 222

Medicinal Chemistry II

 

3

 

 

PHR 225

Basic Pathology & Toxicology

 

2

 

 

PHR 300

Viva voce

 

1

 

 

PHR 313

Pharmacology II

 

3

 

 

PHR 314

Biopharmaceutics & Pharmacokinetics

 

3

 

 

PHR 314L

Biopharmaceutics & Pharmacokinetics  Lab

 

1

 

 

PHR 316

Pharmacotherapy I

 

3

 

 

PHR 317

Pharmaceutical Analysis I

 

3

 

 

PHR 317L

Pharmaceutical Analysis Lab 1

 

1

 

 

PHR 324

Pharmacology III

 

3

 

 

PHR 324L

Pharmacology Lab II

 

1

 

 

PHR 326

Pharmaceutical Analysis II

 

3

 

 

PHR 326L

Pharmaceutical Analysis Lab II

 

1

 

 

PHR 328

Pharmacotherapy II

 

3

 

 

PHR 400

Viva voce

 

1

 

 

PHR 416

Pharmaceutical Technology III

 

3

 

 

PHR 416L

Pharmaceutical Technology Lab III

 

1

 

 

PHR 417

Pharmaceutical Dispensing

 

3

 

 

PHR 417L

Pharmaceutical Dispensing Lab

 

1

 

 

PHR 418

Quality Assurance & Quality Control

 

2

 

 

PHR 424

Pharmacotherapy III

 

3

 

 

PHR 500

Final Viva voce

 

1

 

 

PHR 502

Functional Food & Nutraceuticals

 

2

 

 

PHR 512

Clinical Pharmacokinetics

 

2

 

 

PHR 513

Drug Information

 

2

 

 

PHR 514

Project & Internship

 

3

 

 

PHR 521

Advance Pharmacy Practice Experiences APPE

 

3

 

ELECTIVE COURSES (Any three)

 

(9 Credits)

 

 

PHR 325

Pharmaceutical Biotechnology

 

3

 

 

PHR 414

GMP & Pharmaceutical Industrial Practices

 

3

 

 

PHR 425

Pharmaceutical Marketing and Management

 

3

 

 

PHR 427

Pharmacy Law and Regulatory Affairs

 

3

 

 

PHR 426

Pharmaceutical Engineering

 

3

 

 

PHR 510

Hospital and Community Pharmacy

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OPEN ELECTIVES

(Any three courses)

 

  (9 Credits)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Category of Courses

GE      - General Education/University Core courses
SHLS  - School of Health and Life Sciences Core Course
Core    - Pharmaceutical Sciences Core Courses


Course Descriptions

University General Education Requirements: 37 Credits

Languages:

  • English Composition
  • English Speech
  • Literature (English, Bengali etc.)

Humanities:

  • Philosophy/Ethics
  • History (Indo-Bangla, Muslim or World History)

Social Sciences:

  • Government/ Political Science
  • Economics (Introduction to Micro/Macro)
  • Sociology, Geography or Anthropology

Computer and Math Skills:

  • Introduction to Computer Information System
  • College Algebra/Pre-calculus
  • Statistics I

Sciences (with Lab)

  • Biology I /Human Physiology I
  • General Chemistry I/Physical Pharmacy I
  • Physics I

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND LIFE SCIENCES (SHLS) CORE-33 Credits

  • Calculus I
  • Statistics I
  • Statistics II (Biostatistics)
  • Biology II/Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • General Chemistry II/Physical Pharmacy
  • General Chemistry II/Physical Pharmacy II
  • Organic Chemistry I/ Organic Pharmacy I
  • Organic Chemistry II/ Organic Pharmacy II

 

MAT 120

Calculus I
Covers basic calculus and analytic geometry. Coordinates, Graphs and Lines; Functions and Limits; Differentiations; Application of Differentiation; Integration; Logarithmic and Exponential Functions. Prerequisite: MAT116. 3 Credits.

BBT 203

Statistics II (Biostatistics)
Hypothesis Testing; Power and sample size and two group tests; Tests for binomial proportions; Two sample binomial tests, delta method; Fisher's exact tests, Chi-squared tests; Simpson's paradox, confounding; Retrospective case-control studies, exact inference for the odds ratio; Methods for matched pairs, McNemar's, conditional versus marginal odds ratios; Non-parametric tests, permutation tests; Inference for Poisson counts; and Multiplicity. 3 Credits

BIO 201/
PHR 213

Biology II/ Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Basic concepts in biochemistry; various biochemical pathways; biological macromolecules and their subunits; basic applied concepts in biochemistry to biotechnology; explain the underlying concepts in biotechnology; and relate the biochemical properties and their principles as tools of biotechnology.
Laboratory work: Methods of clinical biochemistry and related topics. 4 Credits

CHE 201/
PHR 210

General Chemistry II/ Physical Pharmacy II
Basic concepts Thermodynamics, thermochemical equations; law of mass action, Chemical kinetics , rate laws, pseudo first order reaction, half-life, Catalysis, Surface and interfacial Phenomena, Diffusion and Dissolution: Fick’s law of diffusion, Phase Equilibria, Photochemistry and Spectrophotometry, Beer-Lambert law, colloidal system, Ionic equilibria: pH of solutions, acids and bases.
Laboratory Work: Determination of order reaction, titrations and related topics. 4 Credits

CHE 202
/PHR 114

Organic Chemistry I/Organic Pharmacy I
The objective of the course is to introduce the physical and chemical behavior of organic molecules, types of reactions, important reactions used to synthesize drugs and pharmaceuticals in the laboratory and their purification. Principles of various types of reactions; Alkane, alkene and alkynes; Aldehyde and ketone; Alcohols, ethers and epoxides; Carboxylic acids; Amines.
Laboratory Work: Detection of an unknown organic compound and related topics. 4 Credits

CHE 301 /PHR 122

Organic Chemistry II/Pharmacy I
The course starts with a review of organic functional group's structure & functions and stereochemistry. Chemistry of aromatic compounds such as benzene,different aromatic acids, amines; aldehyde and ketones etc, types of reactions such as nucleophilicand electrophilic reactions,synthesis of different important aromatic drugs and pharmaceuticals; stereochemistry.
Laboratory Work:  Detection of different bio-molecules from various sources and related topics. 4 Credits

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: 101 Credits
                                                                       


PHR 110

Introduction to Pharmacy
An introductory study of the pharmacy profession. Ethics and scope of pharmacy profession, in different areas, such as, community, industry, government, etc. History and evolution; Modern, Ayurvedic, Unani, Homeopathic and other systems of medicines; Information resources for pharmaceutical science. Definition of drugs, Definition and classifications of different types of dosage forms. 2 Credits

PHR 113

Pharmacognosy
Crude drugs: Introduction; Classification; Preparation for the commercial market; Evaluation of drugs; Drug adulteration. Pharmaceutical uses of lipids and its derivatives; Carbohydrates and its derivatives; and vitamin containing animal drugs. Photochemistry, therapeutic and pharmaceutical uses of plants containing alkaloids, glycosides types of drugs, volatile oils, tannins and resins. 3 Credits

PHR 115

Pharmaceutical Calculations
Fundamentals of measurements and calculations. Interpretation of prescription or medication order. The metric system; calculation of dose; reducing and enlarging of formula; density, specific gravity, specific volume; percentage and ratio strength; dilution and concentration; isotonic solutions, electrolyte solutions, rate of flow calculation, other calculations. 2 Credits

PHR 120

Inorganic Pharmacy
An introduction to the inorganic chemicals used in the pharmaceuticals and studying their basic laws and behaviors. Structure of the atom and molecules. The chemistry of co-ordination compounds. Study of medicinal inorganic compounds, such as, Antioxidants; Gastrointestinal agents; Dental preparations; Topical agents, etc.3 Credits

PHR 120L

Inorganic Pharmacy Lab
Qualitative analysis of Inorganic compounds. Manufacturing of Inorganic Drugs, such as aluminum hydroxide, ferrous sulfate.
1 Credit

PHR 124

Pharmaceutical Microbiology
Basic concepts on microscopes and microscopy, Staining techniques, Morphology, classification and diversity of microorganisms.  Nutrition, growth and cultivation of microbes. Control of microorganisms and practice of sterilization. Immunology and vaccines. Antigen containing preparations. Antibody/SERAcontaining preparations/ Plasma volume expanders and blood related products. Principle of microbial pathogenesis and microbial diseases. 3 Credits

 

PHR 124L

 

Pharmaceutical Microbiology Lab
Study of compound microscope and microscopic observation of stained cell preparations. Gram-staining technique for identification of gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Preparation of nutrient broth and nutrient agar media. Different techniques for inoculation of cultures and isolation of pure culture by streak plate technique. Sterility testing of pharmaceutical products like injections and ophthalmic preparations. 1 Credit

PHR 211

Human Physiology II
Functions of the nervous system, membrane and action potential, organization of the nervous system, the sensory system.  Introduction to the endocrine system, characteristics of hormones, endocrine glands and their hormones, pituitary glands, thyroid and parathyroid glands, adrenal gland, pancreas, gonads, other endocrine glands. The Reproductive System: Male reproductive system overview, Female reproductive system overview.  3 Credits

PHR 212

Pharmaceutical Technology I
Dosage Form Design- Pharmaceutical and Formulation Considerations: The need for different dosage forms, General considerations for dosage form design, Pre-formulation studies, Solutions. Disperse Systems, Suspensions. Emulsions. Topical Preparations: Ointments, Creams and Gels, Lotion.  3 Credits

PHR 212L

Pharmaceutical Technology Lab I
Physical checking of pharmaceutical raw materials and excipients, product formulation and preparation of solution, emulsions, suspensions, syrups, etc. Problems encountered during preparation.1 Credit

PHR 214

Pharmacology I
Introduction to pharmacology, routes of drug administration and its fate, Pharmacokinetics, Membrane transport, absorption and distribution of drugs, metabolism and Excretion  of Drugs, Kinetics of Elimination, pharmacodynamics, mechanism of Drug Action, receptor  pharmacology , Pharmacogenomics: Definition, scope, Importance of Pharmacogenetics to variability in drug response. Autacoids, Anti-inflammatory agents. Anti-asthmatics Drugs acting on GI tract.  3 Credits

PHR 214L

Pharmacology Lab I
Maintenance and handling of experimental animals, routes for drug administration. Effect of CNS stimulants and depressants on rats. Effect of drugs on gastrointestinal (GI) motility and GI absorption of rats. 1 Credit

PHR 215

Medicinal Chemistry I
Stereochemistry, Pharmaceutical importance of studying stereochemistry, Heterocyclic chemistry, Chemistry, SAR, mode of action and synthesis of following groups of drugs: Hypnotics and sedatives, Antihistamines, Proton Pump Inhibitors, Narcotic and non-narcotic Analgesics and Anti-inflammatory agents. 3 Credits

 

PHR 215L

 

Medicinal Chemistry Lab
Synthesis of organic compounds of medicinal importance, exercises on stereo-chemistry & drug receptor interactions, studies of drug design, extraction of metabolic enzymes from liver and their effects. 1 Credit

 

 

PHR 221

Pharmaceutical Technology II
Pharmaceutical dosage forms: solid dosage forms, active drug substance and drug preparation, the necessity of designing dosage forms, Coating of tablets and micro-particulates Capsule dosage forms. Microencapsulation. Cosmetics preparations: Concepts of designing, formulation, manufacturing, and quality control of Cold cream, Vanishing cream, Transparent shampoo, Body lotion, Shaving cream, After shave lotion, Tooth paste.    3 Credits

PHR 221L

Pharmaceutical Technology LabII
Solid mixing, preparation and physical evaluation of different dosage formsi) Tablets including coated tablets, ii) Capsules. Problems encountered during preparation. 1 Credit

PHR 222

Medicinal Chemistry II
Drug discovery and Drug design SAR and synthesis of Antihypertensive agents, Anti-aging drugs, Psychrotropic drugs and antidepressants, Antidiabetic drugs, Semisynthetic Penicillin, Cephalosporins, Quinolone derivaties, oral contraceptives and steroidal hormones, Anticancer drugs. Combinatorial chemistry.    3 Credits

PHR 225

Basic Pathology and Toxicology
Diseases manifestation and patho-physiology. Cellular injury and death. Adaptations in cellular growth and differentiation, intracellular accumulations and cell ageing.  Acute and chronic inflammation.   cellular growth, fibrosis and wound healing. Homodynamic disorders, thrombosis and shock. Genetic disorders. Basic principle of toxicology: incidence of acute poisoning and its managements. Heavy metal toxicology and antagonists. Non-heavy metal environmental toxicants.   3 Credits

PHR 300

Viva voce

PHR 313

Pharmacology II
Antihypertensive drugs: Diuretics,                                                                   Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blocker,   Beta blockers and Calcium channel blockers. Drugs used in congestive heart failure, angina, arrhythmia: Antihyperlipidemic drugs:  Therapeutic management of lipid disorders. Antidiabetic drugs: Concept of diabetes, pathophysiology, principles of drug actions. Pharmacology of Anticancer and immunosuppressive drugs.  3 Credits

PHR 314

Biopharmaceutics & Pharmacokinetics
Definition of biopharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics. Gastrointestinal absorption of drugs, Dosage form consideration, Disintegration and dissolution, Distribution of drug:  elimination rate constant, biological half- life, apparent volume of distribution, Drug clearance: Theoretical aspects of drug elimination. Bioavailability and bioequivalence: Purpose of bioavailability studies. Methods of assessing bioavailability.  3 Credits

 

PHR 314L

 

Biopharmaceutics & Pharmacokinetics Lab
In vivo study of bio-availability of drug: Determination of concentration of aspirin in urine after oral administration. Determination of paracetamol in blood after oral administration. In vitro study of bio-availability of drug: Disintegration and dissolution tests of solid dosage forms. Determination of viscosity of a prepared emulsion. 1 Credit

PHR 316

Pharmacotherapy I
Therapeutic approach in drug interaction: drug-drug, drug-food, drug-disease, drug-clinical markers interactions. Introduction to Pharmacotherapy. Pharmacotherapy of various Respiratory Disorders like asthma, COPD, bronchitis, pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism, etc. Gastrointestinal Disorders like gastric ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux disease etc, Rheumatologic Disorders, Cardiovascular Disorders, Ischemia 3 Credits

PHR 317

Pharmaceutical Analysis I
Identification, characterization, molecular weight determination and estimation or standardization of drugs or pharmaceuticals in pharmaceutical industry. The art and science of pharmaceutical analysis; Introduction; Techniques; Aqueous acid-base titrations; Oxidation-reduction titrations; Complexometric titrations; Non-aqueous titrations; Aquametry; Polarimetry.Chromatographic methods of analysis; Spectroscopy: Visible, UV, IR.  3 Credits

PHR 317L

Pharmaceutical Analysis Lab
Assay of acetyl salicylic acid in aspirin tablets, non-aqueous assay of phenobarbitone tablets  non-aqueous titration of PAS tablets, determination of potency of penicillin tablets, determination of potency of vitamin tablets, determination of calcium gluconate tablets and injections by EDTA titration, determination of saponification value, iodine value and acid value of fixed oils, assay of sulfa-drugs by nitrate titration, microbiological assay of vitamins and antibiotics. 1 Credit

PHR 324

Pharmacology III
Anxiolytic, antidepressant and Antipsychotic agents:  Pathophysiology of Insomnia, Phobia, Depression, Psychosis, Bipolar mania, schizophrenia, ADHD. Antibiotic and antibacterial agents: Classification, principles of action, mechanism of development of resistance therapeutic uses, adverse effect of penicillin, cephalosporin, Fluoroquinolones, Macrolids and aminoglycosides. Overview of rational choice of antibiotics. Antiprotozoal drugs, Anti-fungal Drugs,  and Antiviral Drugs. 3 Credits

 

PHR 324L

 

Pharmacology Lab II
Maintenance and handling of experimental animals, routes for drug administration. Effect of CNS stimulants and depressants on rats. Effect of drugs on gastrointestinal (GI) motility and GI absorption of rats.In vitro test for the evaluation of drugs acting on the cardiovascular system. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory drugs in Carrageenan-induced edema of rats. Analysis and interpretation of experimental data. 1 Credit

PHR 326

Pharmaceutical Analysis II
Introduction to Chromatography: Thin layer Chromatography, Column Chromatography, High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and Gas chromatography (GC). Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy: Introduction, theory and principle of NMR,  applications of NMR in pharmaceutical analysis. Mass Spectrometry (MS): Introduction, basic principle of MS, molecular ion, mass fragmentation, determination of molecular formula, application of GC-MS.  3 Credits.

 

PHR 326L

Pharmaceutical Analysis Lab-II
Assay of acetyl salicylic acid in aspirin tablets, non-aqueous assay of phenobarbitone tablets, determination of potency of penicillin tablets, determination of potency of vitamin tablets, determination of calcium gluconate tablets and injections by EDTA titration, determination of saponification value, iodine value and acid value of fixed oils, assay of sulfa-drugs by nitrate titration, microbiological assay of vitamins and antibiotics. 1 Credit

PHR 328

Pharmacotherapy II
Pharmacotherapy of various Infectious Diseases, Laboratory tests to direct antimicrobial pharmacotherapy, antimicrobial regimen selection, CNS infection Hematologic Disorders, Pharmacotherapy of Renal Disorders: Clinical assessment of kidney function, acute kidney injury, Endocrinologic Disorders, Oncologic Disorders: Cancer treatment and chemotherapy, breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, prostate cancer, lymphomas. Immunologic Disorders. 3 Credits

PHR 400

Viva-voce

PHR 416

Pharmaceutical Technology III
Introduction to sterile pharmaceuticals: Aseptic technique, Parenteral preparations. Ophthalmic preparations, Aerosol drug delivery system: Advantages of aerosol dosage forms, aerosol systems, Suppository: Definition, types of suppositories, advantage and disadvantage of suppository dosage form, factors affecting drug absorption, Blood components and plasma substitutes and expenders: Packaging Materials for pharmaceutical products. 3 Credits

 

PHR 416L

Pharmaceutical Technology Lab III
Formulation and preparation of ointments, creams, lotion and suppositories etc. and their physical evaluation.

 

PHR 417

 

Pharmaceutical Dispensing
The prescription: Definition of dispensing & prescription, parts of prescription, types of prescription, dispensing the prescription, Calculations of doses for infants, adults and elderly patients, enlarging and reducing recipes, Dispensing techniques: Compounding and dispensing procedures, packaging, storage and stability of medicines. Principles in dispensing, Good dispensing practices: 2 Credits

PHR 417L

Pharmaceutical Dispensing Lab
Compounding and Dispensing aspects of solutions (for oral use, external use, for body cavities),suspensions, emulsions and creams, ointments, pastes, gels, suppositories, pessaries, powders, granules, lozenges, pastilles, pills, tablets, capsule, tablet, triturate, etc. Incompatibilities, Prepackaging   1 Credit

PHR 418

Quality Assurance and Quality Control
Detail study of WHO cGMP guide line, MHRA guideline, TGA guideline, etc., Good Laboratory Practices, Sampling and sampling plan, Control charts, Concept of Quality control and quality assurance, Hazards associated with chemicals and Laboratory safety, Importance of calibration, Analytical methods validation.  2 Credits

PHR 424

Pharmacotherapy III
Psychiatric Disorders, childhood disorders, Neurologic Disorders. Pharmacotherapy of Gynecologic and Obstetric Disorders. Urologic Disorders, Dermatologic Disorders, Nutritional Disorders, Ophthalmic and otolaryngological Disorders, Pediatric pharmacotherapy, pediatric fluid, Geriatric drug use, geriatric dementias, geriatric urologic disorders, osteoporosis. Substance abuse: Drug abuse, alcohol use disorders, tobacco use, drug dependence. End-of-Life care/ palliative care.  3 Credits

PHR 500

Final Viva Voce: All topics covered in the B. Pharm. Professional undergraduate program.   1 Credit

PHR 502

Functional foods and Nutraceuticals
Overview on medical foods, functional foods and dietary supplements. Relationship of nutrition and health, dietary guidelines/food pyramid, food habit and obesity, effects of trans and omega 3,6,9 fatty acids on health and diseases.  Antioxidant, antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory and hypolipedimic herbs. Food preservation, food irradiation, fermentation, processing of dairy foods,  cereals and grains, beverages, special infant foods and formulas, microorganisms in food, food packaging.  2 Credits

 

 

PHR 512

Clinical Pharmacokinetics
Compartmental analysis: One-compartment open model and multi- compartment models of intravenous bolus administration.   Drug absorption process: Pharmacokinetics of oral drug absorption process in zero- and first-order model. Multiple dosage regimens: Drug accumulations, estimation of pharmacokinetic parameters, intermittent intravenous infusion, Multiple dosage regimens of extravascular administration. Nonlinear Pharmacokinetics.  2 Credits

PHR 513

Drug Information
An overview of drug information sources, retrieval processes, and analysis. This course will allow to integrate drug information services and utilizing electronic means of the pharmaceutical care model of patient care, which seeks to support the safe, effective, and cost-effective use of medications.  2 Credits

PHR 514

Project & Internship
This is a research course. This course is designed to equip the undergraduate students with the basic methodology of continuing research on various disciplines of pharmaceutical sciences. The students will have to submit a dissertation for partial fulfillment of Bachelor of Pharmacy degree. This internship training is mandatory for all the students after they have completed at least 140 credits. The internship will be arranged in pharmaceutical industries located in Bangladesh. 3 Credits

 

PHR 521

Advance Pharmacy Practice Experiences APPE
Clinical experiences in different settings and the opportunity to care for various types of patients and their illnesses. The desired outcome of these practical encounters is to provide students with the tools necessary to apply the knowledge received from didactic instruction and early practice experiences to the “real-life” patient care settings under the guidance of a knowledgeable practitioner. Finally they will submit a report for evaluation.   3 Credits

PHR 325

Pharmaceutical Biotechnology
Introduction to biotechnology: Structure and function of DNA; Recombinant DNA technology: DNA Library construction and screening, Gene expression and regulation; Polymerase chain reaction; Pharmaceutical application of recombinant DNA technology. Manufacturing of biotech products; Insulin and vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, Gene therapy.     3 Credits

PHR 414

GMP and Pharmaceutical Industrial Practices
This course reviews the recent global developments and trends in all the necessary steps of manufacturing quality pharmaceuticals. General provisions, Organization and personnel, Buildings and facilities, Equipment, Control of components and drug product containers and closures, Production and process control, Packaging and labeling control, Holding and distribution, Laboratory controls, Records and reports, Returned and salvaged drug products. 3 Credits

PHR 425

Pharmaceutical Marketing & Management
Pricing of drugs; Pricing methods. Market Promotion, Advertising, Market demand and forecasting, Tools of pharmaceutical management; Improving decision making; Qualities of a manager. Social and legal organizations; Sole proprietorship; General partnership; Public limited company; Private limited company. Personnel management; Motivation; Staff requirements theory. Inventory control; Purchasing; Effective buying policies; Selecting the sources of supply.  3 Credits

 

PHR 426

Pharmaceutical Engineering
Pharmaceutical industry design, materials for Pharmaceutical plant construction. Pharmaceutical water Engineering, Clean room technology, Control on Air circulation, Environments, personals and Materials uses in Clean room, Various types of filters, Testing the efficacy of clean room filters, humidification and dehumidification, HVAC systems, Clean room testing and monitoring and living particle count, Clean room discipline and gowning practice, Cleaning and disinfection of clean rooms.  3 Credits

PHR 427

Pharmacy Law and Regulatory Affairs
Brief history of pharmacy law, Basics of dispensing laws and rules, Controlled substances, Prescription legality, completeness, appropriateness, Professional practice standards, Medical specialty and Scope of Practice. Drug Act 1940; Drug (Control) Ordinance 1982;   Accepted standards of harmonization and technical requirements for the registration of pharmaceuticals for human use; Approval process, format and registration of pharmaceuticals in Bangladesh. 3 Credits

PHR 510

Hospital and Community Pharmacy
Introduction: goals, minimum standards, abilities required for a hospital pharmacist, Pharmacy and therapeutics committee, Hospital formularies, Purchasing and inventory control, Drug distribution in a hospital, Pharmacy practice, Medication use evaluation: Definition and types, Rational use of drugs in hospital: Organization and structure of Community Pharmacy, Documentation, Over-the-counter products, Community pharmacy economics and management. 3 Credits

 

 

Department of Public Health

Bachelor of Science in Nursing**
** (under development and pending submission)

Curriculum Overview
The Bachelor of Science in Nursing is a four-year undergraduate program under the School of Health & Life Sciences at North South University. To achieve the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree a student must complete at least 120 semester credit hours and fulfill all undergraduate degree requirements of North South University. During the four years period, a student will complete following types of courses:

Category

Contents

Remarks

General Education Courses

Languages, Art, Music, Theatre or Performing Arts, Social Sciences, Computer, Mathematics, and Sciences

Courses are offered centrally by the university. Students are expected to complete these courses within the first six semesters (four months/semester).
Details of these courses are available in the common undergraduate general education course listing of the university and are not included in this degree summary.

Science /
School Curriculum

Biology, Chemistry, Calculus and Statistics

Courses are offered by the School of Health and Life Sciences. Students are expected to complete these courses within the first six semesters (four months/semester). Details of these courses are available School “core” curriculum of the school and are not included in this degree summary.

 

Major/
Dept. Curriculum

Nursing Science

Students are expected to start these courses after completing all university general education courses and School “core” courses.
Semester duration will be 4 months.
In addition to Major (Compulsory) courses, students should take any three from the list of Major (Elective) Courses.

Free Electives

 

Students will take any three courses as free elective courses.

Total

 

120 Credits

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree program requires a minimum of 120 Credits, taking about 4 years/12 semesters to complete. The breakdown of the 120 Credits are given below:

Category

Credits

University General Education Courses

37

School Core

36

Major Required Core

29

Electives

9

Free Electives

9

Total

120 Credits

Eligibility Criteria

  • A minimum GPA of 3.5 in both S.S.C. and H.S.C. from science background 
  • Acceptable scores in NSU’s admission test
  • Average grade point 2.5 or above in five subjects in O level and A level in two subjects with average grade point of 2.0 or above, in the scale of A=5, B=4, C=3, D=2 and E=1 (one E is acceptable)
  • Biology and Mathematics in H.S.C. or A level is mandatory

Student Assessment Criteria

  • Students will be evaluated through 2 midterm examinations and 1 final examination followed by oral assessment and assignments.
  • Student attendance will also be a criterion of assessment where 70% is mandatory.
  • Grading will be as per the NSU grading system
  • Students will enjoy one week examination preparatory time before midterm and final examinations.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing                                             (120 Credits)

UNIVERSITY GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES                           (37 CREDITS)

 

Languages                                                                                         (12 CREDITS)
ENG 102/ENG 103, ENG 105           English composition                            6
ENG 111                                             Public Speaking                                  3
ENG 115                                             Literature                                             3

Humanities                                                                                           (9 CREDITS)
PHI 101/PHI 104                    Philosophy/Ethics                                           3
HIS 101/HIS 102                    History (World/Indo-Bangladesh/Islamic)     6

 

Social Sciences                                                                                       (9 CREDITS)
POL 101/POL 104                  Political Science/Government                         3
ECO 101/ECO 104                 Economics (Micro/Macro Principles)              3
SOC 101/GEO 205/ANT 101 Sociology./Geography./Anthropology            3

Computer & Math skills                                                                       (3 CREDITS)
MIS 105                                  Introduction to Computers                                         -
MAT 112/MAT 116                College Algebra/Pre-calculus     in SHLS core          -          
STA 172                                  Statistics I                                    in SHLS core         -

Sciences (with Lab)                                                                                (4 CREDITS)
BIO 103                                  Biology I                            in SHLS core          -
CHE 101                                 Chemistry I                                 in SHLS core          -
PHY 107L                              Physics I                                                                      -

School Core (SHLS)                                                                              (36 CREDITS)
MAT 112/MAT 116 College Algebra/Pre-calculus                                                    3
STA 172 Statistics I                                                                                                    3
MAT 120 Calculus I:                                                                                                  3
BBT 230 Statistics II (Biostatistics)                                                                           3
Science with Lab:   
BIO 103 Biology I                                                                                                      4
BIO 201 Biology II                                                                                                    4
CHE 101 Chemistry I                                                                                                 4
CHE 201 General Chemistry II                                                                                  4
CHE 202 Organic Chemistry I                                                                                   4
CHE 301 Organic Chemistry II                                                                                  4

 Major Required Courses                                                     (29CREDITS)                 
NUR 101        Introduction to Professional Nursing: Concepts and Practice            3
NUR 202        Pathophysiology for Nursing Practice                                                3
NUR 206        Introduction to Concepts of Illness                                                    2
NUR 252        Maternity and Women’s Health                                                        3
NUR 304        Concepts in Community Health Nursing                                            3
NUR 309        Leadership and Management of Nursing Practice                              3
NUR 320        Nursing Care of Children and Their Families                                     3
NUR 321        Patient Safety and Health Care Quality                                             3
NUR 401        Adult Medical Surgical Nursing                                                         3
NUR 403        Advanced Adult Medical Surgical Nursing                                       3


 ELECTIVE COURSES                                                            (9 CREDITS)

NUR 211 Cultural Competence in Health Care: Bangladesh and Global Contexts  3
NUR 251 Health Assessment                                                                                     3
NUR 303 Mental Health Nursing                                                                               3
NUR 305 Health Policy, Quality and Political Processes                                          3
NUR 308 Legal and Ethical Issues in Nursing                                                           3
NUR 311 Global Health                                                                                             3

FREE ELECTIVE COURSES                                                  (9 CREDITS)
           
Course Descriptions

NUR 101 Introductions to Professional Nursing: Concepts and Practice
This course is an introduction to associate degree nursing roles and nursing process with an emphasis on societal norms and the multicultural influences on health care needs. It focuses on professional development that includes an introduction to associate degree nursing roles and nursing process and the need to appreciate the differences that exist among culturally diverse patient populations. This course provides the student with in-depth study of health patterns, cultural diversity, health perception, management, and self-perception across the life span while utilizing the nursing process and clinical judgment. 3 Credits

NUR 202 Pathophysiology for Nursing Practice
This course is designed to explore the illness component of health, with emphasis on the pathophysiological and psychosocial aspects. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify knowledge from nursing and contributing disciplines as a foundation for the understanding of illness; describe selected theories of stress and adaptation; identify basic pathophysiological and psychosocial aspects of illness; relate common manifestations of illness to the underlying pathophysiological and psychosocial processes; identify physical environmental factors associated with the development of illness; recognize the significance of research to the evidence base of nursing practice related to illness; recognize the different pathological changes related to human variation and lifespan. 3 Credits

NUR 206 Introductions to Concepts of Illness
Concepts of illness related to field of health & disease. Socialization norms and roles (in health and disease), class, gender, health over the early life course, social factors impacting on chronic and acute disease, health and illness issues go beyond the medically influenced everyday common understanding of pathological bodies (disease). Thus this course introduces the students to the complex relationship with social issues and health. The course explores the sociological understanding of health and illness which considers structural and social factors. 2 Credits

 

NUR 211 Cultural Competences in Health Care: Bangladesh and Global Contexts
The course is designed to understand and analyse the key contemporary issues in health culture in terms of patient-provider relationship and how the cultural competence is practiced across the globe. Understanding the global health and social policy that affect the design and structure of the health care system and how the Bangladesh health context is aligned with the global health delivery system. The health policy process and initiatives that shape care delivery will also be taught. 3 Credits

NUR 251 Health Assessments
The course is designed for the development of the knowledge and skills necessary for conducting comprehensive and need-specific health assessments for individuals in the context of their family and community and for determining areas in which health promotion activities should be implemented or reinforced. Students use structured interviews to elicit health histories and health practices and perform physical examinations in a systematic manner and contribute in the identification of a broad range of normal variations through practice with peers in the laboratory setting. 3 Credits

NUR 252 Maternity and Women’s Health
This course is to utilize knowledge from nursing and contributing disciplines related to reproductive health concerns, life events and health alterations of the child bearing family and gynaecological client to maximize client care outcomes; recognize pathophysiological and pharmacological aspects related to the nursing care of the child bearing and gynaecological client; demonstrate progressive development of communication skills including technology which supports the child bearing family and gynaecological client; promote factors that create a culture of safety and caring for the child bearing family and gynaecological client; assess the reproductive health of the child bearing family and gynaecological client within the context of the developmental process. 3 Credits

NUR 303 Mental Health Nursing
The course focuses on care of clients experiencing mental health problems and emphasizes the clinical application of mental health theory in nursing care of patients with acute and chronic mental health problems. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to synthesize knowledge from nursing and the social, health and behavioural sciences to describe the nature of mental adaptations throughout the lifespan; demonstrate effective therapeutic communication skills when dealing with clients, groups and families experiencing maladaptive responses to stress; assess the strengths and weaknesses of the client and family in the context of a group and community environment. 3 Credits

NUR 304 Concepts in Community Health Nursing
Upon completion of this course the student will be able to (a) Synthesize knowledge from nursing, public health, family, and community theory as a foundation for culturally congruent community health nursing practice that is sensitive to race, religion, gender, disability and sexual orientation; (b) Utilize the nursing process and principles of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention that are culturally appropriate in the care of community based clients who differ in terms of health beliefs, values, and practices; (c) Develop skill in the use of independent/interdependent nursing actions to deliver care to clients across the life span; (d) Demonstrate the management of client, family, and community care through appropriate use of concepts of leadership, case management and group process. 3 Credits

NUR 305 Health Policy, Quality and Political Processes
This course will provide students with an understanding of the health policy process and perform analysis relevant to the three main thrusts of policy; cost, quality and access. Students will consider the political, social, economic, and population factors that influence this process. The U.S. health care system will be focused on and comparisons will be made to health systems in other countries as appropriate. The course will integrate quality science and informatics in the context of interdisciplinary, coordinated and ethical health care delivery. Students will have the opportunity to analyse and make recommendations on current health policy issues. 3 Credits

NUR 308 Legal and Ethical Issues in Nursing
This course is designed to provide the theory, knowledge and application necessary to deal with pressing legal and ethical issues in administrative practice. Many concepts are presented that impact patient care on a daily basis. This course is structured to present theories of ethical practice, as well as issues of the law related to health care delivery. You will study both specialties of practice in a blended manner, as the text provides for both to be examined among board-based issues. 3 Credits

NUR 309 Leadership and Management of Nursing Practice
The course is designed as a capstone clinical course to develop the nursing students’ skills in leadership and the management of the delivery of patient care. Students will be placed in clinical settings where they will practice and develop their assessment skills, clinical judgment, and nursing interventions for multiple patient assignments. In addition, students will explore introductory concepts of leadership and management of patient care that will develop their clinical practice in the professional role of the registered nurse. Concepts that will be explored include – advocacy, nursing code of ethics, standards of practice; patient safety, prioritization, managing time, delegation, and supervising care. 3 Credits

NUR 311 Global Health      
This course has been designed so that students will be familiar with international health problems both communicable and non-communicable. Students will be able to communicate and work effectively and at an appropriate level of sophistication with a variety of community groups whose social background may differ widely. This course is a comprehensive introduction to the theory and practice of public health in the international health and hygienic issues. Exploration of the concepts for global public health services, skill development to set as a public health professional to work with common society peoples and special skills or practice areas on current issues related to this field are the course materials here. 3 Credits

NUR 320 Nursing Care of Children and Their Families  
The course focuses on common health problems and nursing intervention for children and adolescents. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to formulate nursing actions that are based on scientific principles and concepts from contributing disciplines in caring for children and adolescents to maximize client care outcomes; develop interpersonal skills in responding in a humanistic manner to the unique needs of children, adolescents, and their families; recognize pathophysiological and pharmacological aspects related to the nursing care of the adult medical surgical client; assess the health needs of diverse populations of children and adolescents based on an understanding of the developmental, psychosocial, environmental, and cultural variables. 3 Credits

NUR 321 Patient Safety and Health Care Quality
This course is all about the processes and skills needed to provide safe, high-quality nursing care. Critical competencies for quality and safety nursing care: patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics. 3 Credits

NUR 401 Adult Medical Surgical Nursing
In this course the students are introduced to the values, knowledge, skills and competencies that are the foundation for safe, evidence-based professional holistic nursing care of adults with common medical and surgical needs. In the clinical and lab environments students will use critical thinking, and effective communication skills to deliver safe, evidence- based care. 3 Credits

NUR 403 Advanced Adult Medical Surgical Nursing
This course builds on the basic concepts introduced in NURS 3112 incorporating complex, multi-system disease processes requiring more developed critical thinking. Students continue to build their knowledge, skills and competencies to appropriately and effectively assess and manage clients/patients in a hospital environment. The students will provide safe, evidence-based professional, holistic nursing care related to the management of clients with advanced medical and surgical needs. 3 Credits

Department of Psychology (New)

Bachelor of Science in Counseling

Minimum credit requirement: 120 Credits
About the program:
The professional major in Counseling is designed to prepare students at the undergraduate level for work in counseling settings or for further graduate education leading to a career as a counselor. It prepares students for entry-level positions in a number of human services settings where counseling skills are necessary. It is also designed to prepare students for entry into a professional Master's degree program in Counseling Psychology and/or the dual-degree programs in Counseling Psychology or Clinical Mental Health Counseling. After successfully meeting the requirements of the Counseling major, students will be able to:

  • Utilize theories of human behavior in assessing clinical problems and develop appropriate skills and interventions.
  • Be able to apply multi-cultural and global perspectives in their approach to counseling practice.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of normal and abnormal psychological development within the human experience across the lifespan.
  • Critically assess and utilize social science research to further their development as counseling professionals.
  • Engage in behaviors and practices that conform to professional values, ethics, and standards.

Curriculum:
The Bachelor of Science in Counseling degree program requires minimum of 120 Credits in about 4 years/12 semesters to complete. The breakdown of the 120 Credits is given below:

Category

Credits

University General Education Courses

37

School Core

36

Major Required Core

29

Electives

9

Free Electives

9

Project work/Intern

Non-credit

Total

120 Credits

Bachelor of Science in Counseling             (120 CREDITS)

UNIVERSITY GENERAL EDUCATION COURSE     (37 CREDITS)

Languages                                                                              (12 CREDITS)
ENG 102/ENG 103, ENG 105 English composition                         6
ENG 111 English speech/Professional Communication                     3
ENG  115 Literature                                                                           3

Humanities                                                                             (9 CREDITS)
PHI 101/PHI 104        Philosophy/Ethics                                           3
HIS 101/HIS 102        History (World/Indo-Bangladesh/Islamic)     6

Social Sciences                                                                       (9 CREDITS)
POL 101/POL 104      Political Science/Government                         3
ECO 101/ECO 104     Economics (Micro/Macro Principles)              3
SOC 101/GEO 205/ANT 101 Soc./Geog./Anthropology                  3

Computer & Math skills                                                       (3 CREDITS)
MIS 105                      Introduction to Computers                                         -
MAT 112/MAT 116    College Algebra/Pre-calculus     in SHLS core          -           
STA 172                      Statistics I                                    in SHLS core         -

Sciences (with Lab)                                                                (4 CREDITS)
BIO 103                     Biology I                 in SHLS core         -
CHE 101                     Chemistry I                      in SHLS core         -
PHY 107L                  Physics I                                                           -
School Core (SHLS)                                                              (36 CREDITS)
MAT 112/MAT116     College Algebra/Pre-calculus                          3
STA 172 Statistics I                                                                            3
MAT 120 Calculus I:                                                                          3
BBT 230 Statistics II (Biostatistics)                                                   3
With Lab    
BIO 103                      Biology I                                                          4
BIO 201                      Biology II                                                         4
CHE 101                    Chemistry I                                                       4
CHE 201                     General Chemistry II                                        4                                                              
CHE 202                     Organic Chemistry I                                         4
CHE 301                     Organic Chemistry II                                        4

Major Required Courses                                                                  (29 CREDITS)

CPY 101         Lifespan Development                                                            3
CPY 102         Theories of Personality                                                           3         
CPY 201         Introductions to Counseling                                                   3
CPY 202         Abnormal Psychology                                                             3
CPY 301         Research Methods in the Social Sciences                               3
CPY 302         Social Policy                                                                           3
CPY 401         Contemporary Issues in Human Services and Counseling     3
CPY 402         Concepts & Skills in Professional Practice                             4
CPY 405         Case Management in Social Work and Counseling                4
CPY 406         Counseling Internship and Seminar                                        0

 

 ELECTIVE COURSES                                                                  (9 CREDITS)
CPY 203         Principles of Art Therapy                                                        3
CPY 204         Principles of Expressive Arts Therapy                                    3
CPY 205         Trauma and Crisis                                                                   3
CPY 303         Counseling Children, Adolescents and Young Adults          3
CPY 304         Applied Group Dynamics                                                       3
CPY 403         Family Interventions                                                               3
CPY 404         Counseling Strategies and Techniques                                   3

FREE ELECTIVE COURSES                                                       (9 CREDITS)


Course Descriptions

UNIVERSITY GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES               (37 CREDITS)
Please see page 34 for General Education Requirements: The Courses
SCHOOL CORE                                                                              (36 CREDITS)
MAT 116  College Algebra/Pre-calculus                                                        3
BBT 203   Statistics I                                                                                     3
MAT 120 Calculus I                                                                                       3
BBT 230  Statistics II (Biostatistics)                                                              3
BIO 103  Biology I                                                                                         4
BIO 201  Biology II                                                                                       4
CHE 101  Chemistry I                                                                                    4
CHE 201  Chemistry II                                                                                  4
CHE 202  Organic Chemistry I                                                                      4
CHE 301  Organic Chemistry II                                                                     4

 

MAT 120

Calculus I
Covers basic calculus and analytic geometry. Coordinates, Graphs and Lines; Functions and Limits; Differentiations; Application of Differentiation; Integration; Logarithmic and Exponential Functions. Prerequisite: MAT116. 3 Credits

 

BBT 230

Statistics II (Biostatistics)
This class presents fundamental concepts in data analysis and statistical inference, focusing on one and two independent samples. Students having taken this class should be able to summarize samples, perform relevant hypothesis tests and perform a collection of two sample comparisons. Classical non-parametric methods and discrete data analysis methods are discussed. The topics cover: Hypothesis Testing; Power and sample size and two group tests; Tests for binomial proportions; Two sample binomial tests, delta method; Fisher's exact tests, Chi-squared tests; Simpson's paradox, confounding; Retrospective case-control studies, exact inference for the odds ratio; Methods for matched pairs, McNemar's, conditional versus marginal odds ratios; Non-parametric tests, permutation tests; Inference for Poisson counts; and Multiplicity. 3 Credits

 

BIO 201

Biology II
This course introduces history, scope and future of Biochemistry and biotechnology. Students learn the basic logics of living organisms, the role of bio-molecules and their interrelationship. The course provides following introductory concepts: i) define and explain the basic concepts in biochemistry; ii) various biochemical pathways; iii) define the biological macromolecules and their subunits; iv) basic applied concepts in biochemistry to biotechnology; v) explain the underlying concepts in biotechnology; and vi) relate the biochemical properties and their principles as tools of biotechnology.
Laboratory work: Main objective of the laboratory section is to bring experience in solving practical problems in biochemistry laboratory, to acquire applicable skills and to teach students to derive conclusions from experiments. Biochemistry part also demonstrates methods of clinical biochemistry and their significance for diagnosis of diseases. 3 Credits

 

 

CHE 201

 

Chemistry II
Thermodynamics - First law, Second law and Introduction, definitions, Thermodynamic terms and basic concepts; Thermochemistry, Exothermic and endothermic reactions, standard enthalpy of formation, thermochemical equations; The nature of chemical equilibrium, law of mass action, equilibrium constant,  relationship between ?G and Keq, effect of temperature and pressure, Le Chatelier’s principle,, Chemical Kinetics and it Definition, reaction rate, rate laws, order reactions, molecularity of a reaction, pseudo first order reaction, half-life, Catalysis, Photochemistry and Spetrophotometry, Transmittance and absorbance, Beer-Lambert law, Properties of liquids, Acids and bases.
Laboratory Work: The laboratory section includes following experiments: Calibration of the calorimeter, determining the heat of fusion of ice, determination of specific heat of an unknown metal, determination of heat of solution and heat of neutralization, determination of second order reaction: iodination of aniline by measuring the optical density of reaction medium. 3 Credits

 

CHE 202

Organic Chemistry I
This course is a comprehensive introduction in fundamental aspects of biological chemistry, for freshmen students. Knowledge of structure, functionality and reactivity of the organic molecules is vital for understanding the mechanism of numerous biological processes and biochemical reactions. This course provides a foundation of organic chemistry, i.e. the understanding of structure, properties, interactions, transformations and nomenclature of organic compounds. Major topics included: Structure & Properties of the Organic Compounds & Bonding; Saturated Hydrocarbons: Alkanes and Cyclic Alkanes; Unsaturated Hydrocarbons: Alkenes & Alkynes; Introduction to Isomerism; Alkyl Halides; Introduction to Aromaticity: Benzene and its derivatives; Alcohol, Phenols & Ethers (-OH group/derivatives); Chemistry of Carbonyl (-CO-) compounds and carboxylic acid derivatives.
Laboratory Work:  The students will get practical experiences on the detection of an unknown organic compound based on their physical and chemical properties. Emphasis will be given on the nature of different laboratory solutions and how to prepare them accurately. Moreover students will also get basic idea how to detect specific organic compound present in biological sample. A number of specific organic reactions will also be demonstrated in this lab. 3 Credits

 

CHE 301

Organic Chemistry II
The course starts with a review of organic functional group's structure & functions and stereochemistry. Later, the discussion will continue with the structures of small bio-molecules, e.g. carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleotides, and lipids. Next, the formation of large bio-molecules from these building blocks is described with reaction mechanisms in terms of the RNA world hypothesis.  The chemistry behind the formation and degradation of these compounds both in vitro and in vivo will be covered with emphasis on learning about complex biological systems from simpler chemical ones. The curriculum covers: carbohydrate chemistry, amino acids chemistry, lipids, lipoproteins, cholesterol and nucleic acid chemistry, introduction to bioorganic synthesis of secondary metabolites.
Laboratory Work: The organic chemistry laboratory section includes detection of different bio-molecules from various sources, determination of chemical properties of representative organic molecules, and detection of organic contents of representative biological samples. 3 Credits

 

Major Required Courses                                                       

(29 CREDITS)

 CPY 101

Lifespan Development

3

 CPY 102

Theories of Personality

3

 CPY 201

Introductions to Counseling

3

 CPY 202

Abnormal Psychology

3

 CPY 301

Research Methods in the Social Sciences

3

 CPY 302

Social Policy

3

 CPY 401

Contemporary Issues in Human Services and Counseling

3

 CPY 402

Concepts & Skills in Professional Practice

4

 CPY 406

Counseling Internship and Seminar

4

 

 

 

CPY 101

Lifespan Development
This course offers a comprehensive study of the theoretical perspectives and contemporary research on human development, exploring various stages of life and the developmental tasks associated with each. The major theories pertaining to cognitive, emotional, moral, and social development throughout the lifespan are explored, with attention given to the interaction of environmental and familial factors with the usual course of development. 3 Credits

 

CPY 102

Theories of Personality
This course explores the major paradigms of personality theory through the use of lectures, discussions, and case studies. Current research is examined and models of personality development are discussed as they relate to current clinical practices. Perspectives will include biological and trait; psychoanalysis, along with other Neo-Freudian perspectives; feminist; social-behavioral; and humanistic/holistic. 3 Credits

 

 CPY 201

Introductions to Counseling
This course introduces some basic issues central to the helping relationship. It offers: 1) an orientation to such topics as developmental perspective, self-image, experienced needs, perception of reality, etc., and how these relate to the counselor in a helping relationship; 2) an overview of current psychotherapies both on a theoretical and practical level; 3) an understanding of the psychological processes which contribute to a style of effective communication; and 4) an examination of the background, status, and future of the counseling field. 3 Credits

 

 

 CPY 202

Abnormal Psychology
Students are introduced to the dynamics of normal and abnormal behavior and adjustment. The course emphasizes the study of basic needs, anxiety, defense mechanisms, neurosis, psychosis, psychotherapy, and prevention of disorder. In-depth consideration of psychoanalytic theory is contrasted with existential and other theories. Case studies will be used. 3 Credits

 

 
CPY 301

 

Research Methods in the Social Sciences
Study of the logic, rules, and techniques of social science research. Topics include relationship of theory and research; research design; measurement; and analysis of data, including elementary statistical analysis. Data collection methods such as experimentation, observation, interviews and questionnaires, and secondary analysis of available data are studied and utilized in research projects. 3 Credits

 

 CPY 302

Social Policy
This course analyzes major policies in the Bangladesh that provide for individuals' and groups' social welfare. Major emphasis is on income supplementation and poverty policies, including welfare and social security; health policies, criminal justice policies and family and child welfare policies. Students engage in critical analysis of policies, especially in terms of who is well served, who is not and what policies need development and change. Comparisons are made to social policies in other nations. 3 Credits

 

 CPY 401

Contemporary Issues in Human Services and Counseling
This course is designed as a senior capstone course for counseling majors. Students critically examine selected contemporary issues related to the development of public policy and legislation. Topic explorations include study of the ethical issues related to service delivery and how political, economic, and social pressure impact policy development. Through analysis of targeted contemporary issues students will examine the connections between social policy, the human service professional, and the delivery of services. 3 Credits

 

 CPY 402

Concepts & Skills in Professional Practice
This course combines theory with practice as students engage in the first of their required internships. The course focuses on the development of communication skills, clinical skills of interviewing, case study, and professional conduct. Students are exposed to the ethics governing the delivery of professional services, with special attention paid to social services in diverse communities. The internship component of the course is designed to help students integrate theory with clinical skills in practice. Students spend a minimum of 90 hours in the field throughout the semester. 4 Credits

 

CPY 405

Case Management in Social Work and Counseling
This course will focus on the knowledge, values, and skills of entry-level generalist case management. Topics to be covered include the case manager's role and function, interviewing, assessment, problem solving, client systems, casework, and case management in the social service agency. This course will be experientially based, utilizing case studies and class exercises. 4 Credits

 

 CPY 406

Counseling Internship and Seminar
The student works under the supervision of an experienced professional in a community setting with a Counseling focus for 180 hours throughout the semester. This experience is supported by a faculty led professional development seminar to examine the issues growing out of daily field experience and to relate them to theories of human development, social policy, and counseling. Internship seminars will be conducted on-line.  Students must secure an internship site before the first class. Non Credits

 

 

 

ELECTIVE COURSES                                                  (9 CREDITS)  
CPY 203         Principles of Art Therapy                                              3                       
CPY 204         Principles of Expressive Art Therapy                          3
CPY 205         Trauma and Crisis                                                        3               
CPY 303         Counseling Children, Adolescent and Young Adults            3     
CPY 304         Applied Group Dynamics                                            3
CPY 403         Family Interventions                                                    3             
CPY 404         Counseling Strategies and Techniques                        3
CPY 405        Case Management in Social Work and Counseling     3

 

CPY 203

Principles of Art Therapy
This course provides an introduction to the history, philosophy, and theory of art therapy. Students will learn about the creative process and visual expression as it relates to therapy. Readings, lectures, films, and experiential exercises will be utilized. No artistic ability or training is necessary. 3 Credits

 

CPY 204

Principles of Expressive Art Therapy
This course provides an introduction to the history, philosophy and theory of expressive arts therapy. Students will study the unique features of different media of creative expression: visual art, dance/movement, drama, creative writing, and music. The class will explore the integration of the arts in therapeutic practice. Readings, lectures, films and experiential exercises will be utilized. 3 Credits

 

CPY 205

Trauma and Crisis
In this course, students gain insights and skills at the paraprofessional level for dealing with severe interpersonal and intrapersonal difficulties which are sometimes perceived as crisis situations. Such difficulties include child abuse, severe drunkenness, drug abuse, rage, and traumatizing fear or grief. Analysis of case studies and role-playing is included in the course, and community speakers at class sessions supplement the course instruction. 3 Credits

 

CPY 303

Counseling Children, Adolescent and Young Adults
Students examine current theories underlying the counseling of children and adolescents. The play approaches of Axline and Moustakas; the person-centered interviewing techniques of Rogers; Glasser's Reality Therapy; Skinner's behavior modification theory; Satir's family counseling; Freud's frameworks, and others are examined in some depth. Students use case studies and role-playing in order to experience personally the issues implicit in counseling with children and youth. In addition, the course facilitates self-exploration and self-understanding in order to prepare students for work as child or youth services professionals. 3 Credits

 

CPY 304

Applied Group Dynamics
This course is designed for students who wish to increase their ability to function effectively in groups. Attention is given to understanding the processes and development of small groups, and to participation, influence, authority, leadership, and other aspects of working in groups. Students are expected to choose and pursue behavior goals for themselves. 3 Credits

 

CPY 403

 

 

 

CPY 404

 

 

Family Interventions
This course examines how different theories of family functioning help in understanding and diagnosing family problems. Students learn specific strategies for enhancing positive family functioning at three levels: [1] individual's experience of the family, [2] family structure and patterns of interaction, and [3] the community context of the family. 3 Credits

Counseling Strategies and Techniques
This course focuses on the refinement of individual counseling procedures and an in-depth examination of various theoretical approaches to therapy. The seminar makes extensive use of cassettes, videos, and classroom exercises focusing on how the therapist and client interact. Strategies stress peer and faculty feedback in classroom exercises and role-playing. 3 Credits

 

 
                                                                       

 

FREE ELECTIVE COURSES                                                       9 CREDITS

Graduate Degree Programs

Department of Biology & Chemistry

Master of Science in Biotechnology

Biotechnology is a rapidly expanding, cutting-edge scientific discipline with new discoveries and often life-saving products at a breathtaking pace. This industry, a merger of science and business, demands a multi-disciplinary workforce skilled in basic-research, product development, regulatory affairs and commercialization.
The Biotechnology industry harnesses advances in molecular biology, genomics, and proteomics to move discoveries and ideas out of the laboratory and into the product development pipeline. Students in the Master of Science in Biotechnology program learn to advance their careers by broadening their skill base and understanding of this dynamic field.
The Master of Science in Biotechnology is grounded in Biochemistry and Cell Biology. With this foundation in science, students continue with studies in the areas of pure science, applied science, lab science, regulatory affairs and biotechnology business. The curriculum is designed so that graduates can participate fully in research; lead lab teams, help to make development and planning decisions, create and apply research modalities to larger schemes set in large research projects. Also, managers and marketers, lawyers and liaisons, all are able to bridge the worlds between their roles and the scientists in their organization, allowing for effective communications and decision making.
The Master of Science in Biotechnology courses and curriculum, presented here, has been developed in consultation with the present courses and curriculum of similar programs at Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University and Vanderbilt University, USA.

Course Structure:
Foundation courses                 12 Credits
Core courses                            12 Credits
Elective courses                      12 Credits
Total                                       36 Credits

Thesis and Non-thesis: Students taking course BBT701 (6 credits), Research in Biotechnology will be on thesis group; others not taking BBT701 will be on non-thesis group. The Non-thesis group graduate students have to take two more theory courses (3+3=6 credits).

Requirements for Master of Science degree in Biotechnology


Foundation courses (4 Courses)

Course ID

Course Title

Credits

 BBT 601

 Biochemistry

3

 BBT 608

 Advanced Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

3

 BBT 615

 Advanced Cell Biology

3

 BBT 622

 Microbiology

3

 Credits for foundation courses

12

 

 

Core courses (4 Courses)

Course ID

Course Title

Credits

 BBT 630

 Principles of Immunology

3

 BBT 638

 Virology

3

 BBT 645

 Plant Biotechnology

3

 BBT 652

 Industrial Microbiology

3

 BBT 671

 Bioinformatics

3

 BBT 685

 Biostatistics

3

 BBT 695

 Pharmaceutical Biotechnology

3

 BBT 630

 Principles of Immunology

3

Credits for core courses

36

Elective courses (3 or 4 Courses)

Course ID

Course Title

Credits

 BBT 659

 Genes & Disease

3

 BBT 678

 Practical Computer Concepts for Bioinformatics

3

 BBT 701

 Research in Biotechnology

6

 BBT 708

 Economic Aspects of Biotechnology

3

 BBT 713

 Managing Biotechnology Professionals

3

 BBT 721

 Marketing Aspects of Biotechnology

3

 BBT 731

 Managerial Finance for Biotechnology

3

 BBT 741

 Introduction to CGMP Compliance 

3

 BBT 751

 QA/QC for the Pharmaceutical & Biotechnology
Industries

3

 BBT 760

 Ethical, Legal, & Regulatory Aspects of the
Biotechnology Enterprise

3

 BBT 773

 Biology of HIV & AIDS

3

 BBT 781

 Protein Bioinformatics

3

 BBT 785

 Methods in Proteomics

3

 BBT 791

 Genomics

3

Credits for elective courses

12

Total Semester Credit Hours

36

 

Course Descriptions

 

BBT 601

Biochemistry
This course explores the roles of essential biological molecules including proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates, with an introduction to nucleic acids. Students examine the structure of proteins, their function, the methodologies for the purification and characterization of proteins, and the alteration of protein function through protein engineering. Enzymes and their kinetics and mechanisms are covered in detail. This course provides the linkage between the inanimate world of chemistry and the living world of biology.  3 Credits

BBT 608

Advanced Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
This course focuses on intermediary metabolism and the role carbohydrates and lipids play in cell function. In addition, students examine nucleic acid structure and function and investigate the tools used in recombinant DNA technology. Specific topics include glycolysis, Kreb’s cycle, oxidative phosphorylation; and DNA replication, transcription, translation, gene regulation, targeted expression of desired genes in plants and animals and post-transcriptional gene silencing like RNA interference RNAi). Prerequisite: BBT 601 Biochemistry. 3 Credits

BBT 615

Advanced Cell Biology
This course covers cell organization and subcellular structure. Students examine the evolution of the cell, chromosome and plasma membrane structures and behaviours, mechanics of cell division, sites of macromolecular synthesis and processing, transport across cell membranes, cell dynamics, organelle biogenesis, and cell specialization. Students also are introduced to the experimental techniques used in cell biology to study cell growth, manipulation, and evaluation. Prerequisite: BBT 601 Biochemistry. 3 Credits

BBT 622

Microbiology
This course is an overview of microorganisms important in clinical diseases and biotechnology. Students are introduced to the general concepts concerning the morphology, genetics, and reproduction of these microbial agents. Lectures focus on individual organisms with emphasis on infectious diseases, biotechnology applications, molecular and biochemical characteristics, and molecular and serological identification methods. Students will also discuss the impact biotechnology, and particularly genomics, will have on the development of antibiotics and vaccines as treatment and preventative measures. 3 Credits

BBT 630

Principles of Immunology
This course covers molecular and cellular immunology, including antigen and antibody structure and function, effector mechanisms, complement, major histocompatibility complexes, B- and T-cell receptors, antibody formation and immunity, cytotoxic responses, and regulation of the immune response. Students are also introduced to the applied aspects of immunology, which include immunoassay design, various formats and detection methods, and flow cytometry. Special topics include immunomodulation, immunosuppression, immunotherapy, autoimmunity, and vaccination. Prerequisites: BBT 601: Biochemistry; BBT 608: Advanced Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; BBT 615: Cell Biology I. 3 Credits

BBT 638

Virology
This series of lectures and discussions emphasizes fundamental principles related to the interaction of animal viruses with host cells. General topics include chemical and physical properties of viruses, virus classification, cultivation and assay of viruses, molecular events during viral replication and morphogenesis, persistent infections, viruses as the cause of neoplasia, and other subjects. Viruses are “entities” studied by some microbiologists.  They are fascinating because although they are acellular and cannot be considered as “true living” organisms, they cannot be considered as “non living” either…or are they?  Some biologist would say that viruses are simply selfish pieces of nucleic acids, which had managed to be propagated by all kinds of organisms.  One thing is true, with their amazing diversity it is not surprising to find that there at least one virus for just about each living organism that inhabits this planet cockroaches appear to be the exception so far).  In this course with will cover the basics of virus structure, biochemistry, replication, pathogenesis and diversity. Prerequisite: BBT 601: Biochemistry; BBT 608: Advanced Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and BBT 615: Advanced Cell Biology I. 3 Credits

BBT 645

Plant Biotechnology
In this course, students are introduced to the application of recombinant DNA technology to agriculture. Studied are methods for the introduction of foreign DNA into plant and animal cells and generation of stably transformed plants and animals. Students consider specific examples of the use of transgenic plants and animals in biotechnology, which can provide protection against insects, diseases, and tolerance to specific herbicides. They also investigate how recombinant growth hormones can result in leaner meat, greater milk yield, better feed utilization, how transgenic plants and animals can serve as bioreactors for the production of medicinal or protein pharmaceuticals, methods of introducing foreign genes to plants, inducible control of gene expression, and use of different/suitable promoters for tissue specific expression. Because recombinant agricultural products are released into the environment or consumed as foods, students also need to become familiar with environmental safety issues. Prerequisites: BBT 601: Biochemistry; BBT 608: Advanced Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; BBT 615: Advanced Cell Biology I  3 Credits

BBT 652

Industrial Microbiology
Industrial microbiology is primarily associated with the commercial exploitation of microorganisms, and involves processes and products that are of major economic, environmental and social importance throughout the world. One of the major aspects of industrial microbiology is related to production of valuable microbial products via fermentation processes. These include traditional fermented foods and beverages, such as bread, beer, cheese and wine, which have been produced for thousands of years. In addition, over the last hundred years or so, microorganisms have been further employed in the production of numerous chemical feedstocks, energy sources, enzymes, food ingredients and pharmaceuticals. This course is intended to be an introduction to industrial microbiology to masters students on a range of applied biology, microbiology, biochemistry, biotechnology, food science and chemical engineering courses. This course will provide an overview of industrial microbiology/biotechnology as an applied biological science. At the end of this subject, students will appreciate the breadth of industrial microbiology, and be able to discuss broadly the use of microorganisms in these areas. They should be able to discuss how different types of industry may obtain, handle, and maintain microorganisms. Fermenters will be considered as a major part of this subject. Students will be able to utilise the basic principles behind the operation of batch and continuous fermenters; discuss the differences between industrial processes that are purely chemical processes and those that are microbiological, and discuss the different uses of batch and continuous fermentation for different industrial purposes. They will be aware of the different methods of genetic improvement that have been used to modify microorganisms for different fermentations. They will learn examples of the modification of chemical compounds in microbial processes.  Prerequisites: BBT 601: Biochemistry; BBT 608: Advanced Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; BBT 615: Advanced Cell Biology I. 3 Credits

BBT 659

Genes and Disease
Because of recent advances, powerful diagnostic tests now detect genetic diseases, and there is promise of gene replacement therapy. In this course students cover general genetic principles, DNA tools for genetic analysis, cytogenetics, gene mapping, the molecular basis of genetic diseases, animal models, immunogenetics, genetics of development, genetics of cancer, and treatment of genetic diseases. Molecular methods of analysis are emphasized. Prerequisites: All four-core courses.3 Credits

BBT 671

Bioinformatics
Retrieval and analysis of electronic information are essential in today’s research environment. This course explores the theory and practice of biological database searching and analysis. In particular, students are introduced to integrated systems where a variety of data sources are connected through worldwide web access. Information retrieval as well as interpretation is discussed and many practical examples in a computer laboratory setting enable students to improve their data mining skills. Methods included in the course are searching the biomedical literature, sequence homology searching and multiple alignments, protein sequence motif analysis, and several genome analytical methods. Classes are held in a computer laboratory. Acquaintance with computers is required. Prerequisites: BBT 601: Biochemistry; BBT 608: Advanced Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.3 Credits

BBT 678

Practical Computer Concepts for Bioinformatics
This course introduces students with a background in the life sciences to the basic computing concepts of the UNIX operating system, relational databases, structured programming, object-oriented programming, and the Internet. Included is an introduction to SQL and the Perl scripting language. The course emphasizes relevance to molecular biology and bio-informatics. It is intended for students with no computer programming background, but with a solid knowledge of molecular biology. Prerequisites: BBT 601: Biochemistry. BBT 608: Advanced Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 3 Credits

BBT 685

Biostatistics
This course introduces statistical concepts and analytical methods as applied to data encountered in biotechnology and biomedical sciences. It emphasizes the basic concepts of experimental design, quantitative analysis of data, and statistical inferences. Topics include probability theory and distributions; population parameters and their sample estimates; descriptive statistics for central tendency and dispersion; hypothesis testing and confidence intervals for means, variances, and proportions; the chi-square statistic; categorical data analysis; linear correlation and regression model; analysis of variance; and nonparametric methods. The course provides students a foundation to evaluate information critically to support research objectives and product claims and a better understanding of statistical design of experimental trials for biological products/devices. Prerequisites: Basic mathematics algebra); scientific calculator. 3 Credits

BBT 695

Pharmaceutical Biotechnology
Pharmaceutical Biotechnology has a long tradition and is rooted in the last century, first exemplified by penicillin and streptomycin as low molecular weight biosynthetic compounds. Today, Pharmaceutical Biotechnology still has its fundamentals in fermentation and bioprocessing, but the paradigmatic change affected by biotechnology and pharmaceutical sciences has led to an updated definition. The biopharmaceutical industry has changed dramatically since the first recombinant protein Humulin) was approved for marketing in 1982. The range of resources required for the pharmaceutical industry has expanded from its traditional fields. Advances in the field of recombinant genetics allows scientists to routinely clone genes and create genetically modified organisms that can be used in industrial production processes. Also, specific therapeutic proteins can be synthesized in nonbiological ways, and recombinant proteins can be isolated from complex mixtures in commercially viable processes. Therapeutic proteins and the recently approved antisense oligonucleotides and recombinants antibodies represent new and innovative biotech drugs that are different from classical drugs in the development and production process. In this area, pharmaceutical companies are confronted with new challenges to develop new products and to apply new technologies. In this course, you will find updated facts and figures about the Biopharmaceuticals, and discussions of how biotechnology is applied in human and animal health care, and in industrial and environmental processes. Pharmaceutical Microbiology course consists of Ten Chapters: 1) Pharmaceuticals, Biologics and Biopharmaceuticals; 2) Antimicrobial Compounds; 3) Recombinant and Synthetic Vaccines; 4) Enzyme Therapeutics; 5) Recombinant Pharmaceuticals; 6) Monoclonal Antibodies and Recombinant Antibodies; and 7) Nucleic Acids as Therapeutic Agents. The text material essentially embodies not only an ample emphasis on the vivid coverage of fundamental principles of microbiology as a scientific discipline but also maintains a manageable length for the apprehension of brilliant students. 3 Credits

BBT 701

Research in Biotechnology for thesis student
Students in the biotechnology program have the opportunity to enrol in an independent research course. This elective course is an option after a student has completed at least eight graduate-level courses and has compiled a strong academic record. Prior to proposing a project, interested students must have identified a research topic and a mentor who is familiar with their prospective inquiry and who is willing to provide guidance and oversee the project. The research project must be independent of current work related responsibilities as determined by the project mentor. The mentor may be a faculty member teaching in the biotechnology program, a supervisor from the student’s place of work, or any expert with appropriate credentials. Prerequisites: All   foundation courses and two core courses. 6 Credits

BBT 708

Economic Aspects of Biotechnology
This course examines the economic, business, and financial forces that define and shape the biotechnology industry, with special focus on early stage and growing companies. A major focus is on decision making under uncertainty, which includes how to interpret and screen various input types in the decision process and how to balance the empirical and intuitive approaches to odelling problems arising from the nature of the biotechnology business. The course will permit the student to prepare an analytic approach to complex problems, identify and assess risks and payoffs, evaluate risks and payoffs in monetary and non-monetary terms, develop a structure for strategy and tactics, and understand how and why people make the decisions they make. Topics include defining and distinguishing the biotechnology industry, competitive forces and impact on strategy, regulation of genetic products, planning under uncertainty, system thinking and system failure, the economic environment, estimating costs and benefits, strategic components, marketing and sales, research and development, and valuing a company.   3 Credits

BBT 713

Managing Biotechnology Professionals
The roles of managers and leaders within biotechnology companies undergo constant change. Biotechnology managers must engage in new and innovative problem-solving strategies; lead a diverse and global workforce; develop partnerships with other businesses, customers, and competitors; manage horizontally and across teams; and utilize technology as a competitive advantage. The student is able to address current challenges in his/her own organization and learn methods of implementing change, such as negotiation techniques and motivation. The course includes in-depth discussions of leadership skills, communication, conflict resolution, and goal integration. Students research a biotechnology organization and odelli what is working and not working within the management systems and suggest alternatives. 3 Credits

BBT 721

Marketing Aspects of Biotechnology
This course introduces students to the strategic and tactical approaches used in the marketing of biotechnological products and services. Students gain a thorough understanding of the research and planning necessary to develop a marketing plan, the relationship between the marketing and sales functions, the difference between marketing a scientific product and a scientific service, pricing strategies, distribution alternatives, communications, promotion, and the importance of perception. Knowledge of marketing terminology and techniques prove helpful to anyone in the industry.  3 Credits

BBT 731

Managerial Finance for Biotechnology
This course integrates the tools of financial analysis with real-world problems in the technology industries. Topics include modelling, costs and benefits, and ratio and break-even analysis. Students will read, prepare, and odelli financial statements. The difference between management financial and tax financial statements will also be covered. 3 Credits

BBT 741

Introduction to cGMP Compliance
This course will introduce students to the cGMP model for quality systems. Compliance to current Good Manufacturing Practices is required in the production of biotechnology as well as drug products. After an introduction to the history of cGMP and the current regulations as they exist today, participants in this course will learn to develop quality systems that will ensure compliance Topics will include cGMP history, to the applicable regulations, comparison of other Regulatory models, Quality Assurance/Quality Control, Document Management and Systems Implementation. 3 Credits

BBT 751

QA/QC for the Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Industries
There are many new quality initiatives for drugs, biotech products and medical devices that have been recently introduced. These include risk based, science based and systems based assessments. Students will be presented with a comprehensive overview of the current best practices in quality assurance and quality control. Students will also be exposed to the most recent theories and expectations from the Food and Drug Administration. 3 Credits

BBT 760

Ethical, Legal, and Regulatory Aspects of the Biotechnology Enterprise
This course provides an overview of the important ethical, legal, and regulatory issues that are critical to the biotechnology industry. The course is divided into the three sections of ethics, legal issues, and regulations, each section taught by a faculty member who specializes in the area. The three sections are organized to provide basic material in a way that allows for an appreciation of how each influences the others. The section on ethics introduces students to core ethical values that guide the practice of science in the biotechnology industry. The section on legal issues focuses on key legal concepts, such as protecting inventions and intellectual property, and licensing. The section on regulation addresses the range of regulatory oversight mechanisms with which the biotech industry must comply and strategies for doing so. 3 Credits

BBT 773

Biology of HIV and AIDS
This course includes an overview of the biology and life cycle of the immunodeficiency virus, including the simian viruses SIVs). Specific areas of HIV immunolopathogenisis are emphasized, to include HIV diagnosis, HIV-induced immune dysfunction, and therapeutic breakthroughs in the treatment of HIV-1 disease. Students become familiarized with current methods in biotechnology that have advanced our understanding of the biology of retroviruses. Special topics include international genetic variation subtypes and clades). HIV vaccine development and global economic impact. Prerequisites: BBT 601: Biochemistry; .BBT 602: Advanced Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; BBT 603: Advanced Cell Biology I. 3 Credits

 

BBT 781

 

Protein Bioinformatics
Because the gap between the number of protein sequences and the number of protein crystal structures continues to expand, protein structural predictions are increasingly more important. This course provides a working knowledge of various computer-based tools available for predicting the structure and function of proteins. Topics include protein database searching, protein physicochemical properties, secondary structure prediction, and statistical verification. Also covered are graphic visualization of the different types of three-dimensional folds and predicting 3-D structures by homology. Computer laboratories complement material presented in lectures. Prerequisites: BBT 601: Biochemistry; BBT 602: Advanced Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; BBT 610: Bioinformatics. 3 Credits

BBT 785

Methods in Proteomics
This course covers the analytical methods used to separate and characterize pharmaceutical compounds predominantly proteins) derived through biotechnology. While emphasis is placed on the general principles and applicability of the methods, current protocols are discussed, and problem sets representing realistic developmental challenges are assigned. Topics include chromatography HPLC, SEC, IEC), electrophoretic techniques 2-D gel electrophoresis), spectroscopic methods UV/Vis, fluorescence, CD), analytical ultracentrifugation, microarrays, mass spectroscopy, amino acid analysis, sequencing, and methods to measure protein-protein interactions. Prerequisites: BBT 601: Biochemistry; BBT 608: Advanced Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 3 Credits

BBT 791

Genomic Sequencing and Analysis
The completion of the human genome sequence is just the latest achievement in genome sequencing. Armed with the complete genome sequence, scientists need to identify the genes encoded within, to assign functions to the genes, and to put these into functional and metabolic pathways. This course will provide an overview of the laboratory and computational techniques beginning with genome sequencing and annotation, extending to bioinformatics analysis and comparative genomics and including functional genomics. Prerequisites: BBT 601: Biochemistry; BBT 602: Advanced Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; BBT 671: Bioinformatics. 3 Credits

MS in Environmental Science and Management (MESM)

 

Foundation Courses (6 credits)

Course Code

Title

Credits

ENV 501

Fundamentals of Environmental Science and Management

3

ENV 502

Environmental Economics

3

Total

 

6

 

Core Courses (18 credits)

Course Code

Title

Credits

ENV 602

Resource and Ecological Economics

3

ENV 606

Environmental and Social Impact Assessment

3

ENV 609

Integrated Resource Management

3

ENV 615

Research Methodology

3

ENV 627

Pollution Control

3

ENV 652

Geographic Information System

3

Total

 

18

 

Elective Courses (12 credits)-Take any 4 course; Thesis can substitute 2 courses

Course Code

Title

Credits

ENV 605

Geography and Natural Disaster

3

ENV 624

Ecological Systems and Biodiversity

3

ENV 626

Integrated Water Resources Planning and Management

3

ENV 629

Waste Management

3

ENV 630

Urban Environmental Management

3

ENV 632

Coastal Environmental Management                                                  

3

ENV 635

Project Development, Monitoring and Assessment

3

ENV 649

Climate Change

3

ENV 685

Water Supply and Sanitation

3

ENV 697

Thesis

3

Total

 

12

 

 

 

In Total: 6+18+12

36

 

 

 

Course Descriptions

Foundation Courses (6 credits)

ENV 501

Fundamentals of Environmental Science and Management
Major components of the environment, population dynamics, environmental management system, biogeochemical cycles, biosphere, lithosphere, atmosphere and hydrosphere, characteristics of ecosystems, management of forests, ranks of biodiversity, renewable and nonrenewable energy sources, concepts of waste management. 3 Credits

ENV 502

Environmental Economics
Free market system and public policy, economic toolkits for environmental management, economic rationale for environmental regulation, economics of rural-urban relations and environmental implications, economists’ articulation of environmental problems, economic development and environmental degradation, environmental management measures, valuation of environmental damages and amenities. 3 Credits

Core Courses (18 credits)

ENV 602

Resource and Ecological Economics
Economic and environmental resources, abiotic and biotic resources, resource availability and limits to growth, ecological economic principles, concepts of market failure and externality, theory of optimal extraction and use of nonrenewable and renewable resources, economic valuation of ecological goods and services, intertemporal equilibrium and ecological economic models in water, fisheries and forestry sectors, globalization, international trade and environmental sustainability, pollution control policies and their implications for growth, efficiency and equity. 3 Credits

ENV 606

Environmental and Social Impact Assessment
Environmental movement, emergence and evolution of environmental impact assessment (EIA); principles of EIA, EIA process for different development projects; EIA methodologies/tools; public participation, EIA regulations in Bangladesh, social impact assessment (SIA), integration of EIA and SIA; tools and methods of SIA, strategic environmental assessment (SEA), integrated environmental assessment (IEA); writing and reviewing EIA report; case studies. 3 Credits

ENV 609

Integrated Resource Management
Concept & Dynamics of INRM; History, evolution, and characteristics of INRM; Challenges and Issues of INRM in practice; Elements of an Integrated Resource Management Approach; Social, political, cultural, institutional, economic, and ecological dimensions of IRM; Linkages between natural and social systems: resilience, sustainability and other perspectives; Indigenous Knowledge (IK) in IRM; Significance and processes of community involvement in IRM; Developing participatory and local level planning for IRM options; Understanding research & learning in the context of IRM Process, tools and strategies; Case studies on sectoral integration: Integrated Watershed Management; Government plan and guidelines; Review of Selected NRM Policies in Bangladesh. 3 Credits


ENV 615

Research Methodology
Research paradigm, qualitative research methods, data collection, processing analysis and interpretation, statistical tools and SPSS, social research methods – survey, interview, ethical issues in social research, quantitative environmental research: field- and/or laboratory based research, safety issues in environmental research design, modeling and simulation, techniques for disseminating research outcome: thesis, articles and presentation, writing research proposals. 3 Credits

ENV 627

Pollution Control
Overview of pollution control: scientific, regulatory, fiscal and other instruments, causes and effects of water, air, soil and noise pollution, air quality standards, gaseous and particulate matter pollution control techniques, noise measurement and control, water quality standards, effluent treatment plant, solid waste management, hazardous waste management and risk analysis, case studies of pollution control strategies and regulations at Bangladeshi and global context. 3 Credits

ENV 652

Geographic Information System
History, Concepts and Application of GIS; Introduction to Arc Catalog and Arc Map; Tabular Data and Basic Queries; Image Projection and Geo-referencing; GIS Data Entry and Management; Cartographic Representation and Map Preparation; Field Work on data acquisition, processing, manipulation, analysis and product generation using vector based GIS software; Participatory GIS and Spatial analysis; Network analysis; Remote Sensing; Image interpretation, processing and analysis; GPS and its use in GIS and remote sensing and individual GIS-RS data project.  3 Credits

Elective Courses (12 credits)-Take any 4 course; Thesis can substitute 2 courses

ENV 605

Geography and Natural Disaster
Introduction to geography, geology and physiography, natural resources and their geographic distribution, environment  and associated problems, dynamic relationships between geological, atmospheric and hydrological processes, causes and geographical distribution of natural disasters, disaster management cycle; hazard, risk, and vulnerability, coping and adaptation mechanisms, analysis of physical characteristics of natural disasters, prediction of their impact on human population; disaster risk reduction strategy; disaster, environment and development. 3 Credits

ENV 624

Ecological Systems and Biodiversity
Basics of ecology and ecosystem, energy and nutrient cycling, population regulation, community structure, ecological succession, terrestrial and aquatic biomes, human impacts on ecosystem and biodiversity, biodiversity conservation at genetic, species and ecosystem levels, roles of protected area, ecological critical area and community conserved areas, national and global conventions and protocols for biodiversity conservation and bio-safety, context of economic development, case studies of biodiversity conservation. 3 Credits

 

 


ENV 626

Integrated Water Resources Planning and Management
Global water availability, scope and major sub-systems of IWRM, overview of hydrology, fluid mechanics and river morphology, water resources system of Bangladesh – rainfall, rivers, wetlands and catchment’s characteristics, urban hydrology and drainage issues, water related disaster management, national policy and plans for water resources, integrated planning and management, transboundary water sharing issues and international water law, climate change and water resources. 3 Credits


ENV 629

Waste Management
Basic principles of waste management, classification of wastes, waste production, collection, disposal and treatment design: 3Rs, thermal and biological treatment processes, engineered sanitary land filling, community based waste management: Bangladesh perspective, economics of waste management, waste to energy, context of sustainable development and protection of natural resources. 3 Credits

ENV 630

Urban Environmental Management
Urban environmental management (UEM) paradigm in planning education; urbanization, urban development, and sustainable cities, meanings of urbanization and urban growth components, urbanization and economic development, demographic and economic settings of urbanization, water safety, sanitation, waste, air pollution, transportation; urban infrastructure financing and cost recovery, decentralized urban system, urban poverty and the informal sector, gender issues, environmental policy for UEM, climate change and cities. 3 Credits

ENV 632

Coastal Environmental Management
Definitions and processes; Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM), fundamentals of coastal processes; coastal resources and ecosystem; wetlands; forestry and mangrove ecosystem; coral reefs; agriculture and fisheries; mining; land use planning and protected area management; human activities and their impact on coastal environments; introduction to Bangladesh coast; development activities; socio-economic aspects in coastal areas: natural hazards and vulnerability level; climate change and its effect on coastal region; Bangladesh National Coastal Zone Management policy. 3 Credits

ENV 635

Project Development, Monitoring and Assessment
Knowledge areas, tools and solutions to support the planning, controlling and monitoring, resource allocation, performance measurement, project management cycle, leadership and management skills, methods for identifying the risks to cause cost overruns, delayed schedules, and failure to meet performance standards, techniques to acquire goods and services, project evaluation, understanding of national planning documents and project management challenges in Bangladesh. 3 Credits

ENV 649

Climate Change
Historical perspective, science of climate change, three regimes of climate change – mitigation, impact and adaptation; impacts of climate change across sectors, regions, countries and communities; vulnerability, adaptive capacity and adaptation needs; IPCC and other perspectives, UNFCCC and Kyoto protocol, CDM, climate change policy, justice and negotiation, financing climate change. 3 Credits

ENV 685

Water Supply and Sanitation
Importance of safe drinking water and improved sanitation, water safety plan, planning and design considerations for water supply and sanitation, pressure-velocity-head relationships, ground water hydrology, water demand and peak factor design flow, water treatment processes, disposal, treatment and management of human waste and wastewater, appropriate sanitation technologies for disaster prone areas, urban and rural sanitation: country situation and international test case scenarios. 3 Credits

ENV 697

Thesis. 6 Credits

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Master of Pharmacy in Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy  (PCP)

Duration: 16 months
Total credit hours:  36
Semester: 4
Course Contents: Thesis

Type of Courses

Number of Courses

Credit Hours

Core Courses

3

9

Specialized course/ Track courses

4

12

Elective/Optional Courses/Directed studies

3

9

Dissertation

1

4

Seminar

1

1

Viva-voce

1

1

Total

13

36

Non-Thesis:


Type of Courses

Number of Courses

Credit Hours

Core Courses

3

9

Specialized course/ Track courses

4

12

Elective/Optional Courses/Directed studies

4

12

Assignment

1

1

Seminar

1

1

Viva-voce

1

1

Total

13

36

 

Distribution of Courses:

Core Courses compulsory for all students)

Course code

Course Title

Total Credits

PHR 5001

Advanced Pharmacology I

3

PHR 5002

Advanced Pharmaceutical analysis

3

PHR 5003

Advanced Statistics in Pharmaceutical Sciences

3

 

Specialized courses/ Track courses

PHR 5011

Advanced Pharmacology II

3

PHR 5012

Toxicology & Safety Pharmacology

3

PHR 5013

Clinical Pharmacy

3

PHR 5015

Drug Use Management

3

 

Elective Courses: Any three Thesis and four Non-Thesis) courses

PHR 5101

Pharmaceutical Marketing and Brand Management

3

PHR 5106

Pharmaceutical Biotechnology

3

PHR 5107

Cellular & Molecular Biology

3

PHR 5108

Drug Regulatory Affairs

3

PHR 5201

Drug Design

3

PHR 5208

Quality control and Quality Assurance

3

PHR 5110

Dissertation (Thesis)

4

PHR 5111

Seminar

1

PHR 5112

Viva voce

1

PHR 5113

Assignment Non-Thesis)

1

Semester-wise Distribution of Courses
Semester-I:


Type of Courses

Course Code

Course Titles

Credits

Core

PHR 5001

Advanced Pharmacology I

3

Core

PHR 5002

Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis

3

Core

PHR 5003

Advanced Statistics in Pharmaceutical Sciences

3

Total

 

 

9

Semester-II:                                                                                            


Type of Courses

Course Code

Course Titles

Credits

Specialized

PHR 5011

Advanced Pharmacology II

3

Specialized

PHR 5012

Toxicology & Safety Pharmacology

3

Specialized

PHR 5013

Clinical Pharmacy

3

Total

 

 

9

Semester-III:


Type of Courses

Course Code

Course Titles

Credits

Specialized

PHR 5015

Drug Use Management

3

Elective

 

Elective I 

3

Elective

 

Elective II

3

Total

 

 

9

Semester-IV    


Type of Courses

Course Code

Course Titles

Credits

Elective

 

Elective III

3

Dissertation

PHR 5110

Dissertation

4

Seminar

PHR 5111

Seminar

1

Viva Voce

PHR 5112

Viva Voce

1

Total

 

 

9

Course Descriptions

PHR 5001 Advanced Pharmacology-I
Care, handling and breeding techniques of laboratory animals and relevant ethical concerns. Organization of preclinical screening programme and safety assessment tests for various classes of drugs including CNS drugs, NSAIDS/SAIDS, drugs acting on CVS, drugs acting in GIT, Diuretics, anti-histamines, Muscle relaxants, anti-diabetics, Antifertility agents, androgens, Anti-thyroid agents, Dermatological agents, Antitumor agents, Anthelmintics, Antimalarials, Antileprotics. In vitro testing of drugs. Animal cell lines and their uses.

PHR 5002 Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis
Spectroscopic Methods including details on UV, IR, NMR, Mass Spectroscopy with examples, Separation Techniques including GLC, HPLC, HPTLC, Chiral Chromatography, lon Pair Chromatography & Capillary Electrophoresis and their application in pharmacy, Thermal Analysis; TGA, DTA, DSC and other methods and application, Immunochemical Techniques- Immuno electrophoresis, Immunoprecipitation, ELISA, RIA, QA and QC ; Validation of equipments, processes, products, etc..

PHR 5003 Advanced Statistics in Pharmaceutical Sciences
Statistics and its application, Variables and Attributes, Classification and tabulation of data. Populations and samples. Frequency distributions. Graphical presentation of data, Describing and summarizing data, Hypothesis testing, Test of significance: various Parametric tests, Non-parametric tests, Regression analysis and correlation, Chi-square & odds ratio, Biostatistics for clinical trials, Study design & types of study. Sampling & sample size determination, Statistical test for bioequivalence. Statistical software package (SPSS, SAS etc).

PHR 5011 Advanced Pharmacology-II
Clinical evaluation of new drugs. Organization, Ethics and protocol for clinical trials, TDM principles, Clinical pharmacology of drugs used in CVS. Pain management, Immunopharmacology, Pharmacotherapy of Gastrointestinal diseases. Pharmacotherapy of Renal diseases. Pharmacotherapy of Respiratory diseases. Pharmacotherapy of Hepatic disorders. Pharmacotherapy of Infectious diseases: Pharmacotherapy of Neoplastic disorders.

PHR 5012 Toxicology & Safety Pharmacology
Fundamental Principles, Molecular aspects of toxicology, Organ toxicology, Necrosis and apoptosis, Raspiratory toxicology, Gastrointstinal toxicology, Nephotoxicology, Cardiovascular toxicology, Toxicology of blood, Immunoxicology; Endocrine toxicology. General reproductive toxicology. Functional neurotoxicology. Neurobehavioural toxicology. Food, nutritional toxicology. Medical and clinical toxicology. Ecotoxicology. Occupational toxicology. Carcinogencity mutagenicity; Teratogenicity.

 

PHR 5013 Clinical Pharmacy
Introduction Scope objective & goals in healthcare, Practice of Clinical Pharmacy in hospitals & community, Fundamentals of diseases: Symptoms & disease identification, Therapeutic use of medicine; Drug Selection & Administration, Reasons for noncompliance, Strategies for Improving Compliance, Use of drugs in Geriatric, Pediatric patients & in Pregnancy. Monitoring the patient in health & illness, Drug information, Therapeutic management of Cardiovascular diseases, Renal disorders, Respiratory disorders. Clinical testing of drugs

PHR 5014 Drug Use Management
This course focus extensibly on the following Problems of Irrational Use of Drugs, Sampling To Study Drug Use, Drug Use Indicator Study, Changing Drug Use Practices, Decisions Making for Rational Use Intervention, Role Of Dispensers in Promoting Drug Use Management, Effective Public Education, Standard Treatment.

PHR 5101 Pharmaceutical Marketing and Brand Management
Introduction to various aspects of essential marketing operations in a pharma. Pricing of drugs; 4Ps vs 6Ps: strategies of pricing and methods. Market Promotion: Approaches; Developing Appraising the opportunity; Media planning; Measuring effectiveness.  Market, demand and forecasting. Pharmaceutical Brand Management; Defining, responsibilities, Brand management across the product life cycle, Current best practices, Brand analysis and research, Contribution of marketing research, Market analysis and segmentation for pharmaceutical branding.

PHR 5106 Pharmaceutical Biotechnology
Industrial Microorganisms: profiling. Industrial Fermentation: Screening, detection, assay, fermentation economics. Industrial Fermentor: Batch and continuous operation, Typical Fermentation Processes: Antibiotics and Enzyme Fermentation, Other Fermentation: yeast and Vitamins. Downstream Processing; Harvesting, Cell Disintegration, Clarification of crude extract, Product Entrichment: precipitation, ultrafiltration, extraction. Chromatography. Biotechnology product formulation, stability studies, quality control, packaging.

PHR 5102 Stem Cell Technology and Regenerative Medicine
The course is designed for in-depth approach to biological topics.  It introduces the physical and chemical organization of living organisms; cell structure, function, and metabolism; classical and molecular genetics; gene regulation; genetic engineering and evolution. Particular emphasize will be given to cancer biology, cell Control by cell cycle and signal transduction pathways and different therapeutic approaches from molecular point of view (such as protein kinase inhibitors, immunotherapy, radiation therapy, therapy in cardiovascular diseases).

PHR 5103 Drug Regulatory Affairs
Concepts, working techniques, tools for pharmaceuticals registration at home and abroad. Accepted standards of harmonization and technical requirements for human use; Approval process and format in Bangladesh. Drug Regulatory Affairs, Intellectual Property Rights, Record keeping, Environment protection Act, Professional ethical norms, Relationship of trust, ethics in pharmacy practice, deficiencies and adherence of self regulation. Code of ethics. Government health and drug policies. ICH, ISO, FDA guidelines for manufacturing quality pharmaceuticals

 

PHR 5105 Pharmaceutical Microbiology
This course focuses on the concepts, working techniques and tools needed to understand the functions of pharmaceutical microbes.

 

Master of Pharmacy in Pharmaceutical Technology & Biopharmaceutics (PCB)

 

Duration: 16 months
Total credit hours:  36
Semesters: 4
Course Contents: Thesis

Type of Courses

Number of Courses

Credit Hours

Core Courses

3

9

Specialized course/ Track courses

4

12

Elective/Optional Courses/Directed studies

3

9

Dissertation

1

4

Seminar

1

1

Viva-voce

1

1

Total

13

36

Non-Thesis:


Type of Courses

Number of Courses

Credit Hours

Core Courses

3

9

Specialized course/ Track courses

4

12

Elective/Optional Courses/Directed studies

4

12

Assignment

1

1

Seminar

1

1

Viva-voce

1

1

Total

13

36

 

Distribution of Courses:

Core Courses compulsory for all students)

Course code

Course Title

Total Credits

PHR 5001

Advanced Pharmacology I

3

PHR 5002

Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis

3

PHR 5003

Advanced Statistics in Pharmaceutical Sciences

3

 

Specialized courses/ Track courses

PHR 5021

Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology

3

PHR 5022

Advanced Pharmaceutics

3

PHR 5023

Advanced Biopharmaceutics & Pharmacokinetics

3

PHR 5209

Pharmaceutical Industrial Management

3

 

Elective Courses: Any three Thesis) and four Non-Thesis) courses

PHR 5101

Pharmaceutical Marketing and Brand Management

3

PHR 5106

Pharmaceutical Biotechnology

3

PHR 5107

Cellular & Molecular Biology

3

PHR 5108

Drug Regulatory Affairs

3

PHR 5201

Drug Design

3

PHR 5208

Quality Control and Quality Assurance

3

 

PHR 5110

Dissertation (Thesis)

4

PHR 5113

Assignment (Non-Thesis)

1

PHR 5111

Seminar

1

PHR 5112

Viva voce

1

Semester-wise Distribution of Courses
Major in Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics

Semester-I:      

Type of Courses

Course Code

Course Titles

Credits

Core

PHR 5001

Advanced Pharmacology I

3

Core

PHR 5002

Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis

3

Core

PHR 5003

Advanced Statistics in Pharmaceutical Sciences

3

Total

 

 

9

Semester-II:                                                                                            


Type of Courses

Course Code

Course Titles

Credits

Specialized

PHR 5021

Pharmaceutical Technology

3

Specialized

PHR 5022

Advanced Pharmaceutics

3

Specialized

PHR 5023

Advanced Biopharmaceutics & Pharmacokinetics

3

Total

 

 

9

Semester-III:   

Type of Courses

Course Code

Course Titles

Credits

Specialized

PHR 5209

Pharmaceutical Industrial Management 

3

Elective

 

Elective II

3

Elective

 

Elective II

3

Total

 

 

9

                                                                                 

 

Semester-IV:
                                                                                                                 


Type of Courses

Course Code

Course Titles

Credits

Elective

 

Elective III

3

Dissertation

PHR 5110

Dissertation

4

Seminar

PHR 5111

Seminar

1

Viva Voce

PHR 5112

Viva Voce

1

Total

 

 

9

 

Course Descriptions

PHR 5001 Advanced Pharmacology-I
Care, handling and breeding techniques of laboratory animals and relevant ethical concerns. Organization of preclinical screening programme and safety assessment tests for various classes of drugs including CNS drugs, NSAIDS/SAIDS, drugs acting on CVS, drugs acting in GIT, Diuretics, anti-histamines, Muscle relaxants, anti-diabetics, Antifertility agents, androgens, Anti-thyroid agents, Dermatological agents, Antitumor agents, Anthelmintics, Antimalarials, Antileprotics. In vitro testing of drugs. Animal cell lines and their uses.

PHR 5002 Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis
Spectroscopic Methods including details on UV, IR, NMR, Mass Spectroscopy with examples, Separation Techniques including GLC, HPLC, HPTLC, Chiral Chromatography, lon Pair Chromatography & Capillary Electrophoresis and their application in pharmacy, Thermal Analysis; TGA, DTA, DSC and other methods and application, Immunochemical Techniques- Immuno electrophoresis, Immunoprecipitation, ELISA, RIA, QA and QC ; Validation of equipments, processes, products, etc.

PHR 5003 Advanced Statistics in Pharmaceutical Sciences
Statistics and its application, Variables and Attributes, Classification and tabulation of data. Populations and samples. Frequency distributions. Graphical presentation of data, Describing and summarizing data, Hypothesis testing, Test of significance: various Parametric tests, Non-parametric tests, Regression analysis and correlation, Chi-square & odds ratio, Biostatistics for clinical trials, Study design & types of study. Sampling & sample size determination, Statistical test for bioequivalence. Statistical software package (SPSS, SAS etc).

PHR 5021 Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology
Advanced Tablet Technology: various granulation techniques; advantages and disadvantages, machineries. Physics of tablet compression; stages and effect of compression, factors affecting, problems. Advanced drug Delivery Systems: TDDM, Mucosal, nasal, ocular, IUD, liposome, nanoparticle, biodegradable and hydrogels, lung delivery. Pilot Plant Scale-Up Techniques; GMP considerations, pilot plant design. Biotechnology Preparations: Insulin, GH, vaccines, antibody, -based pharmaceuticals, recombinant human proteins, FSH; their QA and QC .

PHR 5004 Advanced Pharmaceutics
Solids: Particle size, shape, surface properties. granulation, compression, compaction of mixture, lubrication. Dissolution: drug release, test apparatus for different dosage forms. Enhancement of dissolution rate. Surfactant System: Phase behavior, Factors affecting; Micellization; CMC and micelle size, thermodynamics and kinetics of micelle formation. Solubilization, surfactants in emulsions and suspensions. Effect on dissolution, permeability, absorption and antibacterial activity. Cyclodextrins. Polymer science, Solid dispersions, Accelerated stability studies.

PHR 5023 Advanced Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics
Clinical pharmacokinetics and its importance: half-life, KE, clearance, extraction rate, AUC, protein binding, drug’s conc. in plasma and urine data. Vd; tissue permeability, Physicochemical properties of drugs, Physiological barriers Volume of distribution. Clinical concepts and kinetics of physiological parameters of distribution. Elimination of drug: Renal excretion vs Non renal excretion, BA/ BE: absolute and relative; AUC, Dissolution, IVIVC, Non linear PK. PK and pharmacological correlation, MRT, TDM and ADR.

PHR 5101 Pharmaceutical Marketing and Brand Management
Introduction to various aspects of essential marketing operations in a pharma. Pricing of drugs; 4Ps vs 6Ps: strategies of pricing and methods. Market Promotion: Approaches; Developing Appraising the opportunity; Media planning; Measuring effectiveness.  Market, demand and forecasting. Pharmaceutical Brand Management; Defining, responsibilities, Brand management across the product life cycle, Current best practices, Brand analysis and research, Contribution of marketing research, Market analysis and segmentation for pharmaceutical branding.

PHR 5022 Pharmaceutical Biotechnology
Industrial Microorganisms: profiling. Industrial Fermentation: Screening, detection, assay, fermentation economics. Industrial Fermentor: Batch and continuous operation, Typical Fermentation Processes: Antibiotics and Enzyme Fermentation, Other Fermentation: yeast and Vitamins. Downstream Processing; Harvesting, Cell Disintegration, Clarification of crude extract, Product Entrichment: precipitation, ultrafiltration, extraction. Chromatography. Biotechnology product formulation, stability studies, quality control, packaging. 

PHR 5103 Drug Regulatory Affairs
Concepts, working techniques, tools for pharmaceuticals registration at home and abroad. Accepted standards of harmonization and technical requirements for human use; Approval process and format in Bangladesh. Drug Regulatory Affairs, Intellectual Property Rights, Record keeping, Environment protection Act, Professional ethical norms, Relationship of trust, ethics in pharmacy practice, deficiencies and adherence of self regulation. Code of ethics. Government health and drug policies. ICH, ISO, FDA guidelines for manufacturing quality pharmaceuticals.

PHR 5106 Drug Design
Co-relation study of physicochemical properties, stereochemistry and drug action. Isosterism and bio-isosterism; structural variations, metabolite, antagonism and theory of drug action. Recent advances in drug design relevant examples;  new β-lactam antibiotics, Drug design; antagonism and enzyme inhibition, CADD: Molecular and Quantum Mechanics, active sites, design of ligands, receptor-ligand binding; affinity, Searching for similarity, Pharmacophore models, molecular comparisons and common patterns. Rrational Design of Enzyme Inhibitors.

PHR 5024 Pharmaceutical Industrial Management
Pilot plant design, scale-up; facility, equipment selection, Personnel, process validation for various products. QA, GMP considerations, Total quality management and productivity. ISO 9000. Optimization Techniques; statistical design, Production Planning: site selection, layout plan, vendor selection, development capacity (plant, machine, human resources) assessment of production rate changes, inventory management, costing of product and controls, Machinery Engineering, Safety system, Effluent Testing and Treatment plant, system automation.

PHR 5104 Quality Control and Quality Assurance
Concept of Chemical, Biochemical and Clinical equivalence methods and their appraisal, to study of the identity. purity and content uniformity of drugs. QC control; particulate matter, sampling techniques, analytical, biological, clinical testing, fill quantity. Study of stability, BA/ BE. QC and QA; packaging, shelf life, labeling. Statistical methods and random sampleing. IPQC, Source of drug information, Pharmacopoeias; BP, USP, EP, JP etc., GMP, cGMP and relevant documentation.

Master of Public Health (MPH)

Introduction

Today’s world is changing rapidly than that has been imagined few decades ago. With globalization and technological advancements the faster pace of the world has led people to change in their lifestyle as well as their well-being. With a world having increased number of marginalized population, double burden of disease, and population boom, health care sector of poor and low and middle income countries have suffered from adequate health service providers having proper skill mix and competencies to tackle major health problems.

As the life span has been decreasing with the increasing number of emerging and re-emerging diseases, it is absolutely important to have more comprehensive learning over human resource management in health systems. The aspects of migration, from one demographic transition to the other, socioeconomic factors, and political involvements in various areas of the health sector, all of which have caused more challenges and difficulties in coming to solutions regarding health problems. The holistic approach that has been much talked about over the decades may not have found its way as yet to meet the needs of the people, to make them lead a healthy life.

The field of public health is constantly evolving in response to the needs of communities and populations around the world. The underlying mission of public health is to improve the conditions and behaviours that affect health so that all people can attain it. That mission includes not only the practice of public health policy, but the research of public health issues and the education of future leaders who eventually will translate that research into practices and policies to improve the health of people regionally, nationally, and globally.

Students are expected to learn on the moral and ethical values of various dimensions of health and community settings, while they can build competence in proper health systems research in terms of problem identification, creating strategies with effective planning and should be innovators in intervention design factors that focus on quality of life improvement perspectives.

The multidisciplinary field of public health is aimed at improving the quality of life setting for individuals, families, wider communities, populations and societies, both for now and for generations to come. Considering the communicable and non-communicable diseases and getting a comprehensive understanding over the subject matters of preventive measures, students would be exposed to transformative learning principles to gather more knowledge and establish themselves as future leaders and innovators to solve local problems that are feasible and sustainable with globally proven effects.

Focus of Public Health

The main focus of Master of Public Health program is as follows:

  1. Public Health Program Development and Management
  2. Disease prevention, health preservation and promotion, and rehabilitation
  3. Reproductive and Child Health (RCH)
  4. Public Health Nutrition
  5. Environmental health
  6. Public Health Information, Education and Communication
  7. Population development and Demographic analysis
  8. Emerging and Re-emerging diseases like STD/HIV, Bird Flu, Tropical diseases, Malaria, Enteric diseases, etc.
  9. Research and development (R&D)

 

Careful study of the existing health system, the probable shape of a future system, and the preparation of students for required public health practice, research, and teaching activities continue at the forefront of educational planning. In particular, consideration is given to the system roles that need to be filled, the career decisions graduates need to make, and the group and personal relationships necessary to the task of problem solving. As a result of these considerations, a number of carefully designed educa­tional programs have been developed.

The Mission

As a leading private university in Bangladesh, the Master of Public Health Programme of North South University is dedicated to protecting health and saving lives. Every day, the different departments involved in public health work to keep millions around the world safe from illness and injury by pioneering new research, deploying its knowledge and expertise in the field and educating tomorrow's scientists and practitioners in the global defence of human life. The overarching mission of the Master of Public Health Course of North South University, Dhaka is to advance the public's health through learning, discovery, and communication.

The Objectives

Among the overall educational objectives for all graduates of the School is the development of individual competence and im­proved skills, particularly in (1) recognizing and defining public health problems, setting priorities, and using scientific approaches to problem solving; (2) accumulating appropriate data informa­tion, analyzing and interpreting findings, and assessing relevance and validity; and (3) communicating effectively with colleagues and a variety of groups involved in delivering health services.

The major course objectives are:

  1. to provide the highest level of education and training to ensure proven capacity development in public health program management, research and development, and communication
  2. to foster new discoveries leading to improved health for the people of this country and all nations;
  3. to disseminate new knowledge, development and discoveries to concerned academic policy-makers and development partners.

 

The Master of Public Health (MPH) degree is the most widely recognized professional credential for leadership in public health. The program emphasizes active, student-directed learning, problem solving, and the acquisition of skills essential to the practice of public health. The program is organized around five career-oriented concentrations (see later in Major concentration chapter). In addition to the common core curriculum, each concentration offers specialty electives and a selection of areas of interest, allowing students to explore in depth one or more spheres of relevance to their career goals. The concentrations and areas of interest enable students in the interdisciplinary MPH program to establish a second "home" in one of the school's academic departments

The primary educational objective of the different programs lead­ing to the MPH degree is to provide all candidates with a strong public health foundation along with opportunities to gain new knowledge, credits of view, and skills in the specific areas of public health in which they choose to concentrate. Some previ­ous health or other relevant work experience is highly desirable for all candidates.

For many candidates, the MPH will not be their first professional degree. Many students enter the MPH degree program with previous master’s or doctoral degrees or with varying years of practical experience in professional fields related to public health. Graduates of medical, nursing, dental, and other clinical pro­grams, and applicants who have earned master’s or doctoral de­grees in other health-related areas, or in other academic or pro­fessional areas, will find their academic backgrounds well suited to this program.

Student Profile and Recruitment

MPH Admission Requirements
 
The minimum qualifications for admission to Graduate programs are:

Academic Qualifications

  1. Bachelor degree in Medicine and Surgery (MBBS) or equivalent professional degree in alternate medicine, dentistry, Doctor of Medicine (MD), Food and Nutrition and Pharmacy from any recognized national and overseas university with at least two years of practical exposure in the professional field. The doctor must have to be registered with Bangladesh Medical and Dental Council/National Registration Authority

or

  1. Four year undergraduate degree from a recognized university with a grade point average of 2.5 or more on a scale of 4.0 in social sciences, anthropology and economics

 

or

  1. Three-year bachelors’ degree with honours, with at least a second class in social sciences, anthropology and psychology

or

  1. Master degree in health related subject or in any social science, management and other science subjects with an experience of working in health related fields.

or

  1. A two years graduation in nursing from any recognized university after duly completed four years registered nursing course from government recognized institute. Students other than medical graduate may required to appear before Medical Background Examination Committee to prove their understanding about human health and diseases. They may require taking additional preparatory courses at NSU even after qualifying the test.

 

The candidate must qualify in an admission application consisting of a statement containing the perspective and goal of the candidate in the field of public health as well as undergo an interview.
An entrance exam designed to measure basic writing, numeric and logical skills may be required of all students.
Admission of International Applicants
For purposes of admission, all persons who are not citizens or permanent residents of Bangladesh are defined as international applicants. In most cases international applicants seeking admission into NSU must meet the same academic standards for admission, as those required for native students. There are wide variations; however, between educational systems throughout the world that makes exact comparison of educational standards difficult.
International applicants are selected on the basis of their prior academic work, English proficiency, probability of success in the chosen curriculum (as evidenced by prior work in the academic area involved), and certification of adequate financial resources.
Provisional Admission
NSU may tentatively accept applicants for admission who cannot produce official transcripts by the first week of classes, such admissions are provisional. All provisional students who enter the University without complete credentials for admission will be required to submit the appropriate credentials as a prerequisite for continued enrolment. Required credentials must be submitted within the semester of initial enrolment.
Fraudulent Applications
Individuals who provide fraudulent information on applications for admission or readmission are subject to immediate dismissal from the university.
The Students

As the program is a multi-disciplinary one, students are selected from different disciplines. The student body include:

  1. Graduates and post-graduate degree holders in medical and health related studies who want to deepen their understanding of public health;
  2. Social science and other graduates who have work experience in the health field and want to specialize in public health;
  3. Professionals who are working in NGOs, development organisations or in the private sector with a public health focus;
  4. Academics and researchers who want to refine their knowledge and research skills in public health issues.

 

Faculty

The faculty for teaching courses and guiding students in the program will be carefully chosen considering their academic record, teaching skills and research experience. Team teaching will be used for multi-disciplinary courses or courses requiring both theoretical frameworks and practical experiences. Specialist faculty from other universities and other institutions from within and outside the country will be engaged to conduct courses. Faculty will hold Ph.D degree, MD or equivalent, MPH and be recognized experts in their field. They will be drawn from national and overseas resource pool.

COURSEWORK

To earn an MPH. degree, all students must satisfactorily com­plete at least 36 credits of coursework. At least 36 credits of coursework are required for the MPH degree including core courses; specific area or track required courses, and some electives or optional courses. Most of the reputed universities in North America namely George Washington University, Georgia Regents University, Case Western Reserve University, University of Miami are offering 40 credits. As we are candidate for North American accreditation, so it is required to revise from 51 to 36 credits.

Prerequisite and Fundamental Courses:
For the students who are eligible but weak in English, Computer literacy, and non-oriented with the medical terminology are required to enrol in these subjects offered by the department (see the course structure model).
Core Courses (Total 18 credits: to be completed by 2 semesters): Considering the global standard of public health learning in the internationally reputed universities, the core curriculum required for all MPH can­didates is comprised of courses in Epidemiology, Biostatistics, Research Methodology, Health Information, Education and Communication. These courses provide a common body of knowledge in basic concepts in public health and practice, and are required of all candidates for the MPH degree regardless of previous training, professional interest ca­reer objectives, or program concentration. All core courses are offered at least twice a year following the principles of adult learning and education process, from simple to complex manner. By successfully complet­ing a waiver examination in a core area, a student may be per­mitted to substitute a course in the same or another area.
After completing the study of the core subjects (18 credits), an MPH Fellow will have a proven skill in public health research, public health program management and Communication.
Area of concentration (Credits varies as per requirement of the track or area): These courses provide a series of educational experiences focusing on specific public health areas and offer students opportunities to concentrate on particular issues, skills, interests, or career goals. All candidates for the MPH degree are expected to select one of the major area or track and to follow the prescribed program of study within that area.  Students must apply for an area of concentration they would like to pursue after completion of the first semester or at the beginning of the study. Each of these areas of concen­tration has specific educational objectives, requirements, and methods of study. For an overview, see “Area of Concentration.”
Double Concentration: A student can have two areas of concentration, if s/he had completed the required courses for one concentration and intend to take the required courses of another concentration. In such a case, the total credit will be more than the required 36 credits.
Elective or Optional Courses: Elective or optional courses may be selected from within a student’s area of concentration or in a related field, and from courses offered within the programme or the department. The choice of electives is made with the approval of the department.
Thesis (Total 6 credits hours: to be completed by one exclusive semester, Thesis can substitutes two courses): All MPH students the student will conduct a field research in their chosen public health field and will write a masters level Thesis. Planning for this work will be initiated during the elective period along with a faculty advisor. Fieldwork can be done in Bangladesh or in home country for international students. Synopsis of Research Topic must be approved by Thesis committee of the MPH programme before commencing the research work. A complete Thesis guideline is available in the department for the students.
Course Waiver: MPH students who have completed similar subjects from recognized UGC approved university the core, optional and tract subjects of MPH program during previous degree obtained (at home and abroad) may apply for course/subject waiver with the true copy of original transcript (within 2 years). The waiver committee of the Department will evaluate and recommended for waiver. Although, students are coming for MPH program from different discipline where some of them have master’s or doctoral degrees or with different practical experiences in professional fields related to public health, a student may apply for course waiver depending on their profession or practical experiences. In such case, policy of waiver could be consider as follows-

  1. For Medical Graduate (MBBS, BDS or equivalent) having at least 3 years experience related to public health or relevant fields can apply for a waiver with relevant documents of 1 course which will be evaluated by the approved committee.
  2. For Non Medical Graduate (Social Sciences, other Science degrees or equivalent) with having at least 3-5 years experience related to public health or relevant discipline, can apply for a waiver with relevant documents of 1 course which will be evaluated by the approved committee.
  3. For senior Public Health professional having tremendous experiences in the relevant field of Public Health for more than 15 years, can apply for a waiver of 1-2 courses with relevant documents which will be evaluated by the approved committee.

The University reserves the right to withdraw, add to, or modify the courses of instruction or to change the instructors or schedul­ing at any time.

EXAMINATIONS:
In general, the courses are evaluated by a series of examinations or tests. As per NSU’s standard rule, there will be two midterms and one final written examination. Usually, the each of the midterms contains 20% and the final exam contains 40% of the grades. The rest 20% is distributed among class attendances, homework, quizzes, etc. At least 70% class attendance is mandatory to qualify for the examinations. The respective course teacher will determine the distribution of marks and the type of examinations he/she wants to take depending on the specific need of the subject.
Students will receive a one week exam preparatory leave prior to mid-term and final examination.
For Dissertation, students assessment will be conducted through research presentation followed my oral examination that will contain 30% of the total and mandatory for every student. Participation of all dissertation committee members is mandatory as well. Furthermore, presentation session for each candidate will be at least for 30 minutes where the presentation session will be followed by a Q/A session.  A renowned external examiner will be included in the assessment committee in each dissertation examination session.
Dissertation topics will be approved by the respective supervisors considering the national interest and relevance to public health courses.
GRADES   
Letter grades indicating the quality of course work completed is described elsewhere in this catalogue. MPH program has a MINIMUM PASSING SCORE OF GPA 3.0.

Transfer Students:
Transfer MPH Students (those with previous University/Institution credits) are expected to have at least 2.5 GPA in all credits earned within previous two years. Course catalogue/prospectus and the official transcripts from the previously attended University/institution must be furnished with an application to the Dean of the School of Health and Life Sciences.
For MPH Program, a student may apply for transfer/waiver of maximum 15 credits (out of 36). All earned credits must have GPA 2.5 or more which were earned within previous two years.
Applications will be scrutinized /examined by the Department for relevancy of the contents, credits and grades applied for transfer/waiver.
Duration of the MPH Program
The duration of the Masters in Public Health (MPH) program with Thesis will be of 12 to 36 months. However, there will be provision for experienced students to accelerate the six months allocated to Thesis and to have the final internship waived, thus completing the full course in one calendar year. Each of the short course electives will carry two university credits, enabling non-full time students to accumulate credits towards a diploma or degree. A series of short courses will be offered on the core subjects in the beginning year of the program. These courses will be awarded credit that could then be applied toward the requirements for the MPH degree, for candidates accepted into the degree program.

Distribution of Courses:

Total credit hours:  36, Duration: 1 year to 2 years, Semesters: 3-6

 Course Contents:
The Program offers 6 core courses and several elective/optional courses in the curriculum. The university encourages most of the core courses to be completed in the first two semesters. There is arrangement for flexible options as per need of the respective learner.

 

Sl. No.

Type of Courses

 

Number of Courses

Credit Hours

Duration

01.

Prerequisite (as needed)

:

3

9

1 semester

02.

MPH Core Courses

:

6

18

2 semesters

03.

Required/Track courses

:

3

9

2 semesters

04.

Elective course

:

1

3

1 semester

05.

Thesis/2 Elective Courses

:

 

6

Final semester

 

Total

 

 

36

 

MPH Core Courses: 18 credit hours (Compulsory for all students): 

 

Course Code

Course Title

Total Credits

Duration

PBH 642

Fundamentals of Epidemiology

3

1 semester

PBH 611

Fundamentals of Biostatistics

3

1 semester

PBH 663

Bangladesh Public Health Studies

3

1 semester

PBH 712

Research Methodology

3

1 semester

PBH 631

Fundamentals of Environmental Health

3

1 semester

PBH 701

Health Services Management and Administration

3

1 semester

 

Total

18

 

Students have to choose one of the areas of concentration/track. Each area requires completion of specified credit hours as described in the next pages. The University determines the courses required for specific Area of concentrations. MPH Electives require a minimum enrolment of 10 students

DISTRIBUTION OF COURSES BY CONCENTRATION

EPIDEMIOLOGY

 

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

MPH Core Courses

18

 

EPIDEMIOLOGY Concentration Courses
(any three)

9

PBH 742

Epidemiology II

3

PBH 711

Data management and analysis

3

PBH 842

Clinical Epidemiology

3

PBH 644

Epidemiology of Non Communicable Diseases

3

 

Elective Course (any one)

 

PBH 653 

Health Economics and Financing

3

PBH 681

Public Health Nutrition

3

PBH 708

Total Quality Management and Clinical Governance

3

PBH 805

Thesis 

6

 

Total

36

HEALTH SERVICE AND HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

MPH Core Courses

18

 

HEALTH SERVICE AND HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT Concentration Courses (any three)

9

PBH 704

Principles and Functions of Hospital Management

3

PBH 707

Operations Management & Leadership Development

3

PBH 706

Human Resource Development and Management (HRD & HRM)

3

PBH 678

Health Policy, Planning and Law

3

 

Elective Course (any one)

 

PBH 653 

Health Economics and Financing

3

PBH 681

Public Health Nutrition

3

PBH 708

Total Quality Management and Clinical Governance

3

PBH 805

Thesis

6

 

Total

36

DISASTER MANAGEMENT

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

MPH Core Courses

18

 

DISASTER MANAGEMENT Concentration Courses (any three)

9

PBH 734

Hazard and Disaster Management

3

PBH 715

Information Technology in Disaster Management

3

PBH 736

Disaster Risk Analysis and Management

3

PBH 678

Health Policy and Planning

3

 

 Elective Course (any one)

 

PBH 653 

Health Economics

3

PBH 681

Public Health Nutrition

3

PBH 708

Total Quality Management and Clinical Governance

3

PBH 805

Thesis

6

 

Total

36

 

 

ENVIRONMENTAL AND OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

MPH Core Courses

18

 

ENVIRONMENTAL and OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH Concentration Courses (any three)

9

PBH 731

Fundamentals of Occupational Health and Safety 

3

PBH 732

Environmental Toxicology

3

PBH 733

Environmental Risk assessment and management

3

PBH 665

Behaviour Change Communication

3

 

Elective Course (any one)

 

PBH 653 

Health Economics and Financing

3

PBH 681

Public Health Nutrition

3

PBH 708

Total Quality Management and Clinical Governance

3

PBH 805

Thesis

6

 

Total

36

REPRODUCTIVE AND CHILD HEALTH (RCH)

 

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

MPH Core Courses

18

 

REPRODUCTIVE aND CHILD HEALTH (RCH) Concentration Courses (any three)

9

 

PBH 671

Introduction to Reproductive Health

3

PBH 672

Maternal and Child Health

3

PBH 771

Adolescent Health

3

PBH 665

Behaviour Change Communication

3

 

Elective Course (any one)

 

PBH 653 

Health Economics and Financing

3

PBH 681

Public Health Nutrition

3

PBH 708

Total Quality Management and Clinical Governance

3

PBH 805

 Thesis

6

 

Total

36

 

 

HIV/AIDS AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

MPH Core Courses

18

 

HIV/AIDS and INFECTIOUS DISEASES Concentration Courses (any three)

9

 

PBH 741

Public Health Aspects of HIV/AIDS/STDs

3

PBH 643

Epidemiology of HIV/AIDS and Infectious Diseases

3

PBH 745

HIV/AIDS Interventions and Community Care

3

PBH 665

Behaviour Change Communication

3

 

Elective Course (any one)

 

PBH 653 

Health Economics and Financing

3

PBH 681

Public Health Nutrition

3

PBH 708

Total Quality Management and Clinical Governance

3

PBH 805

 Thesis

6

 

Total

36

PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

MPH core courses

18

 

PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION Concentration Courses
(any three)

9

 

 

 

PBH 681

Introduction to Public Health Nutrition

3

PBH 781

Clinical Nutrition

3

PBH 782

Public Health aspects of Nutritional deficiency

3

PBH 665

Behaviour Change Communication

3

 

Elective Course (any one)

 

PBH 653 

Health Economics and Financing

3

PBH 681

Public Health Nutrition

3

PBH 708

Total Quality Management and Clinical Governance

3

 

Thesis (PBH 805 & 806) / 2 Elective courses

6

 

 

36

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

m-HEALTH


Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

MPH Core Courses

18

 

PUBLIC HEALTH m-HEALTH Concentration Courses
(any three)

9

 

 

 

PBH 682

Introduction to m-Health

3

PBH 784

Fundamentals of Health Informatics

3

PBH 783

Public Health Governance

3

PBH 665

Behaviour Change Communication

3

 

Elective Course (any one)

 

PBH 653 

Health Economics

3

PBH 681

Public Health Nutrition

3

PBH 708

Total Quality Management and Clinical Governance

3

 

Thesis (PBH 805 & 806) / 2 Elective courses

6

 

 

36

GLOBAL HEALTH FOR POLICY AND PRACTICE

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

MPH Core Courses

18

 

PUBLIC HEALTH GLOBAL HEALTH FOR POLICY AND PRACTICE Concentration Courses
(any three)

9

 

 

 

PBH 684

Introduction to Global Health

3

PBH 786

Fundamentals of Health Policy and Practice

3

PBH 783

Public Health Governance

3

PBH 665

Behaviour Change Communication

3

 

Elective Course (any one)

 

PBH 653 

Health Economics

3

PBH 681

Public Health Nutrition

3

PBH 708

Total Quality Management and Clinical Governance

3

 

Thesis (PBH 805 & 806) / 2 Elective courses

6

 

 

36

 

ECO-HEALTH AND CLIMATE CHANGE

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

MPH Core Courses

18

 

PUBLIC HEALTH ECO-HEALTH AND CLIMATE CHANGE Concentration Courses
(any three)

9

 

 

 

PBH 691

Introduction to Eco-Health

3

PBH 790

Introduction to Ecology of Health and Disease

3

PBH 791

Climate Change and Demography

3

PBH 736

Disaster Risk Analysis and Management

3

 

Elective Course (any one)

 

PBH 653 

Health Economics

3

PBH 681

Public Health Nutrition

3

PBH 708

Total Quality Management and Clinical Governance

3

 

Thesis (PBH 805 & 806) / 2 Elective courses

6

 

 

36

Course Descriptions

 

Course Code

Course Title and Description

PBH 611/STA 611

Fundamentals of Biostatistics

 

Statistics and its application. Variables and Attributes. Classification and tabulation of data. Hypothesis testing: concepts, types, p-value. Test of significance: parametric tests (t-test, One way ANOVA, multiple comparison tests (Bonferoni, Duncan, Dunnet, Tukey), repeated measure ANOVA; Non-parametric tests: Mann-whiteney, Wilcoxon rank test, Kruskal-Wallis test, multiple comparison tests (Tukey), Friedman's test. 3 Credits

PBH 631

Fundamentals of Environmental Health

 

Key concepts of Environmental Health and health problems, Water, sanitation and Hygiene. With diarrhoeal and Infectious diseases, Air and water pollution, Various threats to environment and occupational health hazards. It will concentrate on the study of the effect on human health of the physical, biologic and chemical factors in the external environment.  3 Credits

PBH 642

Fundamentals of Epidemiology

 

Basic concepts of epidemiology, principles, aims and importance of epidemiology in public health, and various epidemiological designs (descriptive, analytic and applied epidemiology); Measurement of disease burden of community (Measures of disease frequency: Incidence, Prevalence; Measures of association: RR/ OR, Measures of potential Impact etc) Epidemiological Triads, Infectious and non-infectious disease Epidemiology. 3 Credits

PBH 643

Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology of HIV/AIDS

 

Infectious disease epidemiology monitors the occurrence of infectious diseases and develops strategies for preventing and controlling disease.  In addition to knowing basic epidemiologic methods, infectious disease epidemiologists need to be familiar with the features of important infectious diseases as well as laboratory techniques for the identification and quantification of infectious agents. 3 Credits

PBH 644

Epidemiology of Non- Communicable Diseases

 

This class will review the epidemiology of chronic diseases like cancer, heart diseases, neuralgic, metabolic disorders, etc. and their control measures.  The students are introduced to the application of epidemiologic methods for the study of cancer, injury, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, respiratory disease, sensory, GI, and others. Consideration of traditional intervention programs and alternative intervention strategies is stressed. 3 Credits

PBH 653/ ECO 653

Health Economics

 

This course will provide an overview of qualitative and quantitative decision making with a dominant focus on quantitative techniques for decision-making using clinical and economic end points and their role in clinical strategies of health care and health policy. Demand model, economics and public health overview, input-output model and measurement of activities of daily living are discussed in this course with practical assignments. 3 Credits

PBH 661

Health Behaviour and Education

 

Knowledge of sociology and psychology will help students to understand public health practice and peoples’ reaction to good health and ill health. Studies in stress, culture and human development will provide students with an understanding of people, society and human relations not only of the client but also of the public health professional-client/professional interactions. 3 Credits

PBH 662

Health Education and Health Promotion

 

This course outlines main approaches commonly taken to health promotion, indicating the key strengths and weaknesses of each approaches. The course also focuses on theories and principles, which underline health promotion and health education. Health education and promotion will be explored and discussed in terms of the key concepts, clarity, meaning, definition, and objectives of public health, public health practices, and issues and on the problems in Bangladesh.
3 Credits

PBH 663

Bangladesh Public Health Studies

 

This course is designed to provide an understanding about the Bangladesh history and of its independence. The course is also designed to learn about the culture, traditions and the health care scenario in Bangladesh and how the health care system works in the country. The concept of Public Health and the challenges and success stories of public health in Bangladesh context will also be explored in this course. 3 Credits

PBH 665

Behavior Change Communication (BCC)

 

The course will include sessions on evaluation of health communication programs. This course covers the underlying concepts, principles, historical development, theory, and current practice of health promotion. It is organized around an ecological framework, with class sessions focusing on theory and practice at the individual, group, community, organization, and policy levels.
3 Credits

PBH 672

Maternal and Child Health

 

The following areas will be covered: MCH in the global perspectives, prenatal care, risk behaviour in pregnancy, breastfeeding, and maternal and infant mortality, violence, abuse and neglect of women and children. This is an interactive course in which we will consider, develop, challenge, and evaluate ideas and views across the scientific, clinical, economic, political, and ethical/legal aspects of each issue.
3 Credits

PBH 678

Health Policy and Planning

 

This course encompasses criteria and planning principles for institutional and community personal health care services. Rationale and methods used in developing short and long range plans. The role of the individual health facility, inter-hospital affiliations, city and government health agencies, and professional organizations in the community planning process. This course examines the issues pertinent to the role of the planning and marketing functions.
3 Credits

 

PBH 681

Public Health Nutrition

 

After completion of this course learners will be able to define and discuss nutrition sciences, characteristics of different food components, dietary sources, assessment of nutritional state problems and solution with planning of advice regarding healthy good consumption habits. The course guides the students to identify risks of nutrition related problems and as public health nutrition specialists, describe and analyze the food and nutrition system in a community.
3 Credits

PBH 682

Introduction to m-Health

 

Introduces core principles and methods for implementing mHealth and eHealth interventions in Low and Middle-Income Countries (LMIC). Through case studies and interactions with practitioners, students articulate basic requirements for mHealth applications and eHealth systems; consider approaches to assess applications of information and communication technologies; and identify and discuss challenges for deploying mHealth and eHealth systems in LMIC. 3 Credits

PBH 701

Health Administration and Management

 

The purpose of this course is to provide basic knowledge regarding all the major public health disciplines including principles of public policy formulation, ethical functions, public health Laws and administration, Health economics, Medical audit and Disaster management, which student will acquire during subsequent study unit. 3 Credits

PBH 704

Hospital Management

 

The course includes hospital manpower, logistic and resource planning and management, hospital need assessment for resources, manpower, services based on demand-supply index, procurement, human motivation, health counselling, hospital service networking and coordination, leadership development, decision-making, service quality control, and crisis management. 3 Credits

PBH 706/HRM 706

Human Resource Development and Management (HRD & HRM) for Health Services

 

Effective human resource management is a priority strategic objective of successful organizations. When organizations don’t achieve high performance results, the problem often can be attributed to mismanagement or “under-management” of human resources. Successful health services administrators and public service managers are knowledgeable about HR trends and implications and are equipped to engage them strategically. 3 Credits

PBH 707/MGT 707

Operation Management & Leadership Development

 

The course will introduce to the students with the basic concepts of operational management and leadership development. Particular emphasise will be given to applied concepts, functions, principles and strategies of management focusing planning, organizing, staffing, leading, monitoring and evaluating the management performances.
3 Credits

PBH 708/MGT 708

Total Quality Management and Clinical Governance

 

This course is designed to introduce the student to principals of clinical quality management and performance improvement in the health-care industry. Focus is on standards and implementation of quality programs and principals and concepts of performance improvement. The course also covers additional areas such as utilization management, risk management, and tools and techniques used in performance improvement and quality management.
3 Credits

PBH 711/STA 711

Data Management and Analysis

 

The course introduces students with advanced biostatistics required in public health. The course emphasizes on specific problems, common aspects of model construction, testing linearity and other assumptions, and modifications needed for clustered data. This course will use computer software like SPSS, Excel, Epi-Info, GIS, etc.
3 Credits

PBH 712

Research Methodology

 

Study of this course provides a guide for quantitative and qualitative research strategies aiming at developing learner’s understanding and critical awareness about the research process. It promotes public health professionals to develop ability to critique research issues, general principles and concepts in public health research with emphasis on critical appraisal of issues. 3 Credits

PBH 715

Information Technology in Disaster Management

 

This course is aimed to provide the learners with the skills of various aspects use of information technology is disaster risk assessment and management. The course will include topics on role of IT in disaster management, needs of IT for the managers and the people, use of IT in reducing disaster loss, conceptual flow of disaster-related information, 3 Credits

PBH 731

Occupational Health

 

This course provides students with a comprehensive idea about different aspects of microorganisms, parasites and insects that are important for the health of the community. This offers students a general introduction, public health importance and recent advances in microbiology, introduction to medical Parasitology, common parasitic diseases of public health importance in Bangladesh and their interventions. 3 Credits

PBH 732

Environmental Toxicology

 

The course introduces students with the foundations of how environmental pollutants affect biological health. A discussion of major environmental pollutants, their sources, interactions with atmospheric, terrestrial and aquatic systems, exposure of people, animals and other biota, and their dose-response relationships.  and exposure routes of pollutants, and effects of exposure and risk perception,. 3 Credits

PBH 733

Environmental Risk Assessment and Management

 

This course will provide students with knowledge related to (1) the broad field of environmental risk assessment, (2) the risk associated with a chemical or radionuclide, (3) general steps involved in the risk assessment process, and (4) several tools that can be used in defining environmental risks, particularly as related to human health. 3 Credits

PBH 734

Hazard and Disaster Management

 

This course is designed to provide opportunities for learning of skills that can be applied to all hazards. Initially the focus will be on "natural" hazards - hazards related to the behaviour of natural systems affecting people and facilities. The students will be able to contribute constructively to the practice and development of hazard and disaster management procedures with potential to take a leading role in due course. 3 Credits

PBH 736

Disaster Risk Analysis and Management

 

Using the rubric of risk analysis the course engages its participants to consider the risk of natural, biological, chemical or other disasters. Course participants will also gain an understanding of the process of developing actionable intelligence that can be used by the public health, medical and public safety communities to reduce risk and enhance the security planning, prevention, response, mitigation and recovery process. 3 Credits

PBH 737

Environmental Risk and Health Impact

 

Examines emerging public health challenges posed by incidents involving chemicals, radiation and biological agents.  Students are provided with the opportunity to undertake guided research on current topics in the field and discuss their findings with graduate students and faculty members. 3 Credits

PBH 741

Public Health Aspects of HIV/ AIDS/STDs

 

This course provides an overview of the theories and behavioural interventions used to reduce risk of HIV transmission and examine their impact in a variety of populations. Current research findings of these major theoretical models in various “at risk” populations will be critiqued. This course is designed to assist the student in planning and implementing HIV prevention programs. Course content is delivered through lectures, group discussion, and assigned readings. 3 Credits

PBH 742

Epidemiology II

 

This course is designed to provide practical skills on various epidemiological design namely, descriptive, analytic and experimental studies. Important epidemiological issues like, random errors, bias, confounding and effect modifications, screening tests, investigation of epidemics, epidemic surveillance, causal inference interpretation and critical appraisal of epidemiological methods. 3 Credits

PBH 747

HIV/AIDS Interventions and Community Care

 

Students will be able to understand the progression of HIV/AIDS and its impact on individual, groups and communities. Students will be able to analyze the link between socio-cultural aspects and prevention strategies concerning the spread of HIV/AIDS and gain knowledge on how to respond and help people infected and affected by HIV/AIDS.
3 Credits

PBH 771

Adolescent Health

 

The adolescents in our country lack necessary information about safe reproductive health practices and they do not know how to protect themselves from unwanted pregnancy and diseases like STDs/HIV/AIDS. The limited reproductive health services that exist in the community are often non-responsive to the broader needs of the adolescents. The course also introduces child abuse, violence towards children and other related issues. 3 Credits

PBH 781

Clinical Nutrition

 

This course provides an understanding of the principles of nutrition assessment in terms of the requirements in infancy and early childhood, inborn errors of metabolism, hyperlipidemic syndromes, nutrition and malnutrition, intestinal mal-absorption syndromes, metabolic bone disease, nutrition and cancer, obesity, malnutrition in the hospital and nutrition in the elderly patient. Students are familiarized with the application of dietary modification 3 Credits

PBH 782

Public Health aspects of Nutritional deficiency

 

This course will begin with an overview of the immune response to infection, considering both the protective mechanisms that operate to control inflammation, and discussing the effect of inflammation on nutritional status.  Then it will include the effects of Protein energy malnutrition (PEM), principally considering studies conducted on paediatric populations, the effects of specific micronutrients on human health conditions. 3 Credits

PBH 783

Public Health Governance

 

This program focuses on issues of governance and analyses how society deals with challenges and policy problems, often by combining the resources of government, private and community sectors. Students develop practical knowledge combined with high level research skills and a critical, enquiring approach to questions of governance and policy development in the new millennium. 3 Credits

PBH 784

Fundamentals of Health Informatics

 

To develop an understanding of health information and to provide an introduction to all core elements of the program. Included will be an introduction to the philosophy of the program and to the basic ethical framework that will apply throughout the program. 3 Credits

PBH 790

Introduction to Ecology of Health and Disease

 

The course is the consideration of the interrelationships and interdependencies between individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities, and societies and their effects on health status. High level wellness, health, and disease are distinguished. Concepts are developed based on the evolution of public health in civilizations as well as contemporary influences. 3 Credits

PBH 791

Climate Change and Demography

 

The overall aim of this subject is to provide an introduction to the socio-political, scientific, and economic aspects of the phenomenon known as Climate Change. In doing so it is hoped that the student will emerge with an enhanced ability to analyse claims both about the science itself and the responses that can be made by humanity at present and for the future, based on current scientific data and its predictions over the next decades. 3 Credits

PBH 805

Thesis

 

This course is basically the most vital part of the EMPH program. Students have to meet departmental standards while presenting this Thesis work.  Each of the students has to take and submit a Thesis according to the prescribed universal format of the University. Students are encouraged to spend sufficient time on their thesis project for data collection, analysis and report writing and defence.
6 Credits (3+3)
The total course is divided in two parts:
PBH 805 – Thesis proposal development: 3 credits and
PBH 806 – Final Thesis and Defence: 3 credits

PBH 842

Clinical Epidemiology

 

This course will help students to learn or refine the skills of Epidemiology, defined as the study and management of illness in individuals as well as populations using different epidemiological methods. Students will learn the epidemiologic process, how to design and assess studies of prognosis or outcomes of illness, treatments, diagnostic tests and on screening programs, as well as the basic requirements for randomized clinical trials and drug development trials. 3 Credits

EXECUTIVE MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Introduction

Today’s world is changing rapidly than that has been imagined few decades ago. With globalization and technological advancements the faster pace of the world has led people to change in their lifestyle as well as their well-being. With a world having increased number of marginalized population, double burden of disease, and population boom, health care sector of poor and low and middle income countries have suffered from adequate health service providers having proper skill mix and competencies to tackle major health problems.

As the life span has been decreasing with the increasing number of emerging and re-emerging diseases, it is absolutely important to have more comprehensive learning over human resource management in health systems. The aspects of migration, from one demographic transition to the other, socioeconomic factors, and political involvements in various areas of the health sector, all of which have caused more challenges and difficulties in coming to solutions regarding health problems. The holistic approach that has been much talked about over the decades may not have found its way as yet to meet the needs of the people, to make them lead a healthy life.

The field of public health is constantly evolving in response to the needs of communities and populations around the world. The underlying mission of public health is to improve the conditions and behaviours that affect health so that all people can attain it. That mission includes not only the practice of public health policy, but the research of public health issues and the education of future leaders who eventually will translate that research into practices and policies to improve the health of people regionally, nationally, and globally.

Students are expected to learn on the moral and ethical values of various dimensions of health and community settings, while they can build competence in proper health systems research in terms of problem identification, creating strategies with effective planning and should be innovators in intervention design factors that focus on quality of life improvement perspectives.

The multidisciplinary field of public health is aimed at improving the quality of life setting for individuals, families, wider communities, populations and societies, both for now and for generations to come. Considering the communicable and non-communicable diseases and getting a comprehensive understanding over the subject matters of preventive measures, students would be exposed to transformative learning principles to gather more knowledge and establish themselves as future leaders and innovators to solve local problems that are feasible and sustainable with globally proven effects.

Focus of Public Health

The main focus of Master of Public Health program is as follows:

      1.   Public Health Program Development and Management
2.   Disease prevention, health preservation and promotion, and   rehabilitation
3.   Reproductive and Child Health (RCH)

  1. Public Health Nutrition
  2. Environmental health
  3. Public Health Information, Education and Communication
  4. Population development and Demographic analysis
  5. Emerging and Re-emerging diseases like STD/HIV, Bird Flu, Tropical diseases, Malaria, Enteric diseases, etc.
  6. Research and development (R&D)

Careful study of the existing health system, the probable shape of a future system, and the preparation of students for required public health practice, research, and teaching activities continue at the forefront of educational planning. In particular, consideration is given to the system roles that need to be filled, the career decisions graduates need to make, and the group and personal relationships necessary to the task of problem solving. As a result of these considerations, a number of carefully designed educa­tional programs have been developed.

The Mission

As a leading private university in Bangladesh, the Master of Public Health Programme of North South University is dedicated to protecting health and saving lives. Every day, the different departments involved in public health work to keep millions around the world safe from illness and injury by pioneering new research, deploying its knowledge and expertise in the field and educating tomorrow's scientists and practitioners in the global defence of human life. The overarching mission of the Master of Public Health Course of North South University, Dhaka is to advance the public's health through learning, discovery, and communication.

The Objectives

Among the overall educational objectives for all graduates of the School is the development of individual competence and im­proved skills, particularly in (1) recognizing and defining public health problems, setting priorities, and using scientific approaches to problem solving; (2) accumulating appropriate data informa­tion, analyzing and interpreting findings, and assessing relevance and validity; and (3) communicating effectively with colleagues and a variety of groups involved in delivering health services.

 

The major course objectives are:

1. to provide the highest level of education and training to ensure proven capacity development in public health program management, research and development, and communication
2. to foster new discoveries leading to improved health for the people of this country and all nations;
3. to disseminate new knowledge, development and discoveries to concerned academic policy-makers and development partners.

The Executive Master of Public Health (EMPH) degree is the most widely recognized professional credential for leadership in public health. The programme emphasizes active, student-directed learning, problem solving, and the acquisition of skills essential to the practice of public health. The program is organized around five career-oriented concentrations (see later in Concentration areas chapter). In addition to the common core curriculum, each concentration offers specialty electives and a selection of areas of interest, allowing students to explore in depth one or more spheres of relevance to their career goals. The concentrations and areas of interest enable students in the interdisciplinary EMPH program to establish a second "home" in one of the school's academic departments

The primary educational objective of the different programs lead­ing to the EMPH degree is to provide all candidates with a strong public health foundation along with opportunities to gain new knowledge, credits of view, and skills in the specific areas of public health in which they choose to concentrate. Some previ­ous health or other relevant work experience is highly desirable for all candidates.

For many candidates, the EMPH will not be their first professional degree. Many students enter the EMPH degree program with previous master’s or doctoral degrees or with varying years of practical experience in professional fields related to public health. Graduates of medical, nursing, dental, and other clinical pro­grams, and applicants who have earned master’s or doctoral de­grees in other health-related areas, or in other academic or pro­fessional areas, will find their academic backgrounds well suited to this program.

 

 

 

 

Student Profile and Recruitment

EMPH Admission Requirements
 
The minimum qualifications for admission to Graduate programs are:

 

Academic Qualifications

1. Bachelor degree in Medicine and Surgery (MBBS) or equivalent professional degree in alternate medicine, dentistry or Doctor of Medicine (MD) Food and Nutrition and Pharmacy from any recognized national and overseas university with at least two-five years of practical exposure in the professional field of public health. The doctor must have to be registered with Bangladesh Medical and Dental Council/National Registration Authority

Or

  1. Four year undergraduate degree from a recognized university with a grade point average of 2.5 or more on a scale of 4.0 in social sciences, anthropology and economics

 

Or

  1. Three-year bachelors’ degree with honours, with at least a second class in social sciences, anthropology and psychology

Or

  1. Master degree in health related subject or in any social science, management and other science subjects with an experience of working in health related fields.

Or

  1. A two years graduation in nursing from any recognized university after duly completed four years registered nursing course from government recognized institute. Students other than medical graduate may required to appear before Medical Background Examination Committee to prove their understanding about human health and diseases. They may require taking additional preparatory courses at NSU even after qualifying the test.

 

The candidate must qualify in an admission application consisting of a statement containing the perspective and goal of the candidate in the field of public health as well as undergo an interview.
An entrance exam designed to measure basic writing, numeric and logical skills may be required of all students.

Admission of International Applicants
For purposes of admission, all persons who are not citizens or permanent residents of Bangladesh are defined as international applicants. In most cases international applicants seeking admission into NSU must meet the same academic standards for admission, as those required for native students. There are wide variations; however, between educational systems throughout the world that makes exact comparison of educational standards difficult.
International applicants are selected on the basis of their prior academic work, English proficiency, probability of success in the chosen curriculum (as evidenced by prior work in the academic area involved), and certification of adequate financial resources.
Provisional Admission
NSU may tentatively accept applicants for admission who cannot produce official transcripts by the first week of classes, such admissions are provisional. All provisional students who enter the University without complete credentials for admission will be required to submit the appropriate credentials as a prerequisite for continued enrolment. Required credentials must be submitted within the semester of initial enrolment.
Fraudulent Applications
Individuals who provide fraudulent information on applications for admission or readmission are subject to immediate dismissal from the university.
The Students

As the program is a multi-disciplinary one, students are selected from different disciplines. The student body include:

1. Graduates and post-graduate degree holders in medical and health related studies who want to deepen their understanding of public health;
2. Social science and other graduates who have work experience in the health field and want to specialize in public health;
3. Professionals who are working in NGOs, development organisations or in the private sector with a public health focus;
4. Academics and researchers who want to refine their knowledge and research skills in public health issues.

Faculty

The faculty for teaching courses and guiding students in the program will be carefully chosen considering their academic record, teaching skills and research experience. Team teaching will be used for multi-disciplinary courses or courses requiring both theoretical frameworks and practical experiences. Specialist faculty from other universities and other institutions from within and outside the country will be engaged to conduct courses. Faculty will hold Ph.D degree, MD or equivalent, EMPH and be recognized experts in their field. They will be drawn from national and overseas resource pool.

COURSEWORK

To earn an EMPH degree, all students must satisfactorily com­plete at least 36 credits of coursework. At least 36 credits of coursework are required for the EMPH degree including core courses; specific area or track required courses, and some electives or optional courses. Most of the reputed universities in North America namely George Washington University, Georgia Regents University, Case Western Reserve University, University of Miami are offering 40 credits. As we are candidate for North American accreditation, so it is required to revise from 51 to 36 credits.
Prerequisite and Fundamental Courses:
For the students who are eligible but weak in English, Computer literacy, and non-oriented with the medical terminology are required to enrol in these subjects offered by the department (see the course structure model).
Core Courses (Total 18 credits: to be completed by 2 semesters): Considering the global standard of public health learning in the internationally reputed universities, the core curriculum required for all EMPH can­didates is comprised of courses in Epidemiology, Biostatistics, Research Methodology, Health Information, Education and Communication. These courses provide a common body of knowledge in basic concepts in public health and practice, and are required of all candidates for the EMPH degree regardless of previous training, professional interest ca­reer objectives, or program concentration. All core courses are offered at least twice a year following the principles of adult learning and education process, from simple to complex manner. By successfully complet­ing a waiver examination in a core area, a student may be per­mitted to substitute a course in the same or another area.
After completing the study of the core subjects (18 credits), an EMPH Fellow will have a proven skill in public health research, public health program management and Communication.
Area of Concentration (Credits varies as per requirement of the track or area): These courses provide a series of educational experiences focusing on specific public health areas and offer students opportunities to concentrate on particular issues, skills, interests, or career goals. All candidates for the EMPH degree are expected to select one of the major area or track and to follow the prescribed program of study within that area.  Students must apply for an area of concentration they would like to pursue after completion of the first semester or at the beginning of the study. Each of these areas of concen­tration has specific educational objectives, requirements, and methods of study. For an overview, see “Area of Concentration.”
Double Concentration: A student can have two areas of concentration, if s/he had completed the required courses for one concentration and intend to take the required courses of another concentration. In such a case, the total credit will be more than the required 36 credits.
Elective or Optional Courses: Elective or optional courses may be selected from within a student’s area of concentration or in a related field, and from courses offered within the programme or the department. The choice of electives is made with the approval of the department.

Community Diagnosis and Field Practice (Practical Experience) [Total credit 3 hours: to be completed within a semester]: All EMPH degree candidates must meet a practical experience requirement equivalent in time and effort to a minimum of one academic term. The practicum provides educational opportunities that are different from, and supplementary to, the more academic aspects of the program. The focus, content, approach, and timing of the practicum vary with the major courses and with the particular needs of each student. For example, it may take the form of field or agency observations; placement in an administrative, research, or clinical setting; participation in ongoing research or program activities; or independent study. It may be completed before or after the final term of academic work, or be integrated into the academic program. Students must consult with the course in-charges or practicum advisor to assure satisfying the requirement. A guideline is available in the department for the practicum course.
Thesis (Total 6 credits hours: to be completed by one exclusive semester, Thesis can substitutes two courses): All EMPH students the student will conduct a field research in their chosen public health field and will write a masters level Thesis. Planning for this work will be initiated during the elective period along with a faculty advisor. Fieldwork can be done in Bangladesh or in home country for international students. Synopsis of Research Topic must be approved by Thesis committee of the EMPH programme before commencing the research work. A complete Thesis guideline is available in the department for the students.
Course Waiver: EMPH students who has completed similar subjects from recognized UGC approved university the core, optional and tract subjects of EMPH program during previous degree obtained (at home and abroad) may apply for course/subject waiver with the true copy of original transcript (within 2 years). The waiver committee of the Department will evaluate and recommended for waiver. Although, students are coming for EMPH program from different discipline where some of them have master’s or doctoral degrees or with different practical experiences in professional fields related to public health, a student may apply for course waiver depending on their profession or practical experiences. In such case, policy of waiver could be consider as follows-

      1. For Medical Graduate (MBBS, BDS or equivalent) having at least 3 years experience related to public health or relevant fields can apply for a waiver with relevant documents of 1 course which will be evaluated by the approved committee.
      2. For Non Medical Graduate (Social Sciences, other Science degrees or equivalent) with having at least 3-5 years experience related to public health or relevant discipline, can apply for a waiver with relevant documents of 1 course which will be evaluated by the approved committee.
      3. For senior Public Health professional having tremendous experiences in the relevant field of Public Health for more than 15 years, can apply for a waiver of 1-2 courses with relevant documents which will be evaluated by the approved committee.

The University reserves the right to withdraw, add to, or modify the courses of instruction or to change the instructors or schedul­ing at any time.

 

EXAMINATIONS:
In general, the courses are evaluated by a series of examinations or tests. As per NSU’s standard rule, there will be two midterms and one final written examination. Usually, the each of the midterms contains 20% and the final exam contains 40% of the grades. The rest 20% is distributed among class attendances, homework, quizzes, etc. At least 70% class attendance is mandatory to qualify for the examinations. The respective course teacher will determine the distribution of marks and the type of examinations he/she wants to take depending on the specific need of the subject.
Students will receive a one week exam preparatory leave prior to mid-term and final examination.
For Dissertation, students assessment will be conducted through research presentation followed my oral examination that will contain 30% of the total and mandatory for every student. Participation of all dissertation committee members is mandatory as well. Furthermore, presentation session for each candidate will be at least for 30 minutes where the presentation session will be followed by a Q/A session.  A renowned external examiner will be included in the assessment committee in each dissertation examination session.
Dissertation topics will be approved by the respective supervisors considering the national interest and relevance to public health courses
GRADES
Letter grades indicating the quality of course work completed is described elsewhere in this catalogue. EMPH program has a MINIMUM PASSING SCORE OF GPA 3.0
Transfer Students:
Transfer EMPH Students (those with previous University/Institution credits) are expected to have at least 2.5 GPA in all credits earned within previous two years. Course catalogue/prospectus and the official transcripts from the previously attended University/institution must be furnished with an application to the Dean of the School of Health and Life Sciences.
For EMPH Program, a student may apply for transfer/waiver of maximum 15 credits (out of 36). All earned credits must have GPA 2.5 or more which were earned within previous two years.
Applications will be scrutinized /examined by the Department for relevancy of the contents, credits and grades applied for transfer/waiver.
Duration of the EMPH Program
The duration of the Masters in Public Health (EMPH) program with Thesis will be of 12 to 36 months. However, there will be provision for experienced students to accelerate the six months allocated to Thesis and to have the final internship waived, thus completing the full course in one calendar year. Each of the short course electives will carry two university credits, enabling non-full time students to accumulate credits towards a diploma or degree. A series of short courses will be offered on the core subjects in the beginning year of the program. These courses will be awarded credit that could then be applied toward the requirements for the EMPH degree, for candidates accepted into the degree program.

Distribution of Courses:

 

 

 

 

 Total credit hours:  36, Duration: 1 year to 2 years, Semesters: 3-6
Course Contents:
The Program offers 6 core courses and several elective/optional courses in the curriculum. The university encourages most of the core courses to be completed in the first two semesters. There is arrangement for flexible options as per need of the respective learner.

Sl. No.

Type of Courses

 

Number of Courses

Credit Hours

Duration

01.

Pre Requisite (as needed)

:

3

9

1 semester

02.

EMPH Core Courses

:

6

18

2 semesters

03.

Required/Track courses

:

4

12

2 semesters

04.

Thesis/2 Elective Courses

:

 

6

Final semester

 

Total

 

 

36

 

EMPH Core Courses: 18 credit hours (Compulsory for all students):

 

Course Code

Course Title

Total Credits

Duration

EMPH 642

 Operational Epidemiology

3

1 semester

EMPH 611

 Applications of Biostatistics

3

1 semester

EMPH 663

 Bangladesh Public Health Studies

3

1 semester

EMPH 712

Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methodology

3

1 semester

EMPH 631

Climate Change and Environmental Health

3

1 semester

EMPH 701

Public Health and Population Studies

3

1 semester

 

Total

18

 

Students have to choose one of the areas of concentration/track. Each area requires completion of specified credit hours as described in the next pages. The University determines the courses required for specific Area of concentrations.

EMPH Electives require a minimum enrolment of 10 students

 

DISTRIBUTION OF COURSES BY CONCENTRATION:

EPIDEMIOLOGY

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

EMPH Core Courses

18

 

EPIDEMIOLOGY Concentration Courses (any four)

12

 

 

 

EMPH 742

Epidemiology II

3

EMPH 711

Data management and analysis

3

EMPH 842

Clinical Epidemiology

3

EMPH 644

Epidemiology of Non-Communicable Diseases

3

EMPH 744

Microbial Disease Transmission and Public Health Disease Burden

3

 

Elective Course

 

EMPH 707
EMPH 716
EMPH 621
EMPH 732

Principles of Organizational Leadership & Communication Public Health Geriatrics
Public Health Moral Values and Ethics
Eco-Health

3
3
3
3

EMPH 805

Thesis

6

 

Total

36

 

 HEALTH SERVICE AND HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT

 

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

EMPH Core Courses

18

 

HEALTH SERVICE AND HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT Concentration Courses (any four)

12

 

 

 

EMPH 704

Principles and Functions of Hospital Management

3

EMPH 653

Health Economics and Financing

3

EMPH 706

Human Resource Development and Management (HRD & HRM)

3

EMPH 678

Health Policy, Planning and Law

3

EMPH 625

Organizational Analysis for Health Service Improvement

3

 

Elective Course (any two)

 

EMPH 707
EMPH 716
EMPH 621
EMPH 737

Principles of Organizational Leadership & Communication Public Health Geriatrics
Public Health Moral Values and Ethics
Eco-Health

3
3
3
3

EMPH 805

Thesis

6

 

Total

36

 

DISASTER MANAGEMENT

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

EMPH Core Courses

18

 

DISASTER MANAGEMENT Concentration Courses (any four)

12

 

 

 

EMPH 623

Managing People and Organizations in Health Care

3

EMPH 734

Hazard and Disaster Management

3

EMPH 715

Information Technology in Disaster Management

3

EMPH 736

Disaster Risk Analysis and Management

3

EMPH 746

Epidemiology of Accidents and Injury

3

 

Elective Course (any two)

 

EMPH 707
EMPH 716
EMPH 621
EMPH 737

Principles of Organizational Leadership & Communication Public Health Geriatrics
Public Health Moral Values and Ethics
Eco-Health

3
3
3
3

EMPH 805

Thesis

6

 

Total

36

 

 

 

 

 

ENVIRONMENTAL AND OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

EMPH Core Courses

18

 

ENVIRONMENTAL AND OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH Concentration Courses (any four)

12

 

 

 

EMPH 731

Occupational Health 

3

EMPH 732

Introduction to Environmental Toxicology

3

EMPH 733

Environmental Risk Management

3

EMPH 665

Behaviour Change Communication

3

EMPH 735

Industrial Hygiene and Hazard Management

 

 

Elective Course (any two)

 

EMPH 707
EMPH 716
EMPH 621
EMPH 737

Principles of Organizational Leadership & Communication Public Health Geriatrics
Public Health Moral Values and Ethics
Eco-Health

3
3
3
3

EMPH 805

Thesis

6

 

Total

36

REPRODUCTIVE AND CHILD HEALTH (RCH)

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

EMPH Core Courses

18

 

REPRODUCTIVE AND CHILD HEALTH (RCH) Concentration Courses (any four)

12

 

 

 

EMPH 671

Reproductive Health

3

EMPH 672

Maternal and Child Health

3

EMPH 771

Adolescent Health

3

EMPH 665

Behaviour Change Communication

3

EMPH 772

Contemporary Issues in Reproductive Health Management

3

 

Elective Course (any two)

 

EMPH 707
EMPH 716
EMPH 621
EMPH 737

Principles of Organizational Leadership & Communication Public Health Geriatrics
Public Health Moral Values and Ethics
Eco-Health

3
3
3
3

EMPH 805

Thesis

6

 

Total

36

HIV/AIDS and INFECTIOUS DISEASES

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

EMPH Core Courses

18

 

HIV/AIDS and INFECTIOUS DISEASES Concentration Courses (any four)

12

 

 

 

EMPH 741

Public Health Aspects of HIV/AIDS/STDs

3

EMPH 643

Epidemiology of HIV/AIDS and Infectious Diseases

3

EMPH 745

HIV/AIDS Interventions and Community Care

3

EMPH 665

Behaviour Change Communication

3

EMPH 802

Health Rights, Welfare and Ethics-Social Context

3

 

Elective Course (any two)

 

EMPH 707
EMPH 716
EMPH 621
EMPH 737

Principles of Organizational Leadership & Communication Public Health Geriatrics
Public Health Moral Values and Ethics
Eco-Health

3
3
3
3

EMPH 805

Thesis

6

 

Total

36

PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION  

Course Code

Course Title

Credit Hours

 

EMPH Core Courses

18

 

PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION Concentration Courses (any  four)

12

 

 

 

EMPH 681

Public Health Nutrition

3

EMPH 781

Clinical Nutrition

3

EMPH 782

Public Health Aspects of Nutritional Deficiency

3

EMPH 665

Behaviour Change Communication

3

EMPH 703

Public Health Problems and Community Diagnosis

3

 

Elective Course (any two)

 

EMPH 707
EMPH 716
EMPH 621
EMPH 737   

Principles of Organizational Leadership & Communication Public Health Geriatrics
Public Health Moral Values and Ethics
Eco-Health

3
3
3
3

EMPH 805

Thesis

6

 

Total

36

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CORE COURSES

Course Code

Course Title and Description

 

EMPH 642

 

Operational Epidemiology

 

Basic concepts of epidemiology, principles, aims and importance of epidemiology in public health, and various epidemiological designs (descriptive, analytic and applied epidemiology); Measurement of disease burden of community (Measures of disease frequency: Incidence, Prevalence; Measures of association: RR/ OR, Measures of potential Impact etc) Epidemiological Triads, Infectious and non-infectious disease Epidemiology, Sources of epidemiological data and their uses in public health etc. 3 Credits

EMPH 611/STA 611

Applications of Biostatistics

 

Statistics and its application. Variables and Attributes. Classification and tabulation of data. Populations and samples. Frequency distributions. Graphical presentation of data. Describing and summarizing data: statistical averages & measures of dispersion; Probability and probability distributions. Hypothesis testing: concepts, types, p-value. 3 Credits

EMPH 663

Bangladesh Public Health Studies

 

This course is designed to provide an understanding about the Bangladesh history and of its independence. The course is also designed to learn about the culture, traditions and the health care scenario in Bangladesh and how the health care system works in the country. The concept of Public Health and the challenges and success stories of public health in Bangladesh context will also be explored in this course. 3 Credits

 

EMPH 712

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methodology

 

Study of this course provides a guide for quantitative and qualitative research strategies aiming at developing learner’s understanding and critical awareness about the research process. It promotes public health professionals to develop ability to critique research issues, general principles and concepts in public health research with emphasis on critical appraisal of issues. Provides the student with the basic concepts and methodologies needed to undertake evaluation research. 3 Credits

EMPH 631

Climate Change and Environmental Health

 

Key concepts of Environmental Health and health problems related with climate change. The concepts of water, sanitation and hygiene factors will also be explored in this course. With diarrhoeal and Infectious diseases, Air and water pollution, Topics covered will include approaches to control the major environmental health problems in industrialized and developing countries. 3 Credits

 

EMPH 701

 

Public Health and Population Studies

 

This course introduces issues to familiarise students with the fundamentals of demography and demographic literature, along with demography analysis of population structures and population dynamics. Topics will include Davis-Blake theory of fertility determinants, demographic transition theory, concept and measurement of rates, ratios and risk, use of demographic and health survey data and other data source, and Urbanization and Migration.3 Credits

 

ELECTIVE COURSES

Course Code

Course Title and Description

EMPH 621

Public Health Moral Values and Ethics

 

This course explores how law can both promote and impede the public’s health. It describes the legal concepts that underlie the public health system and frame public health policy. It explains and clarifies the role of law in public health practice, administration, and enforcement. Legal and ethical issues in the delivery of health care are presented. In terms of confidentiality, informed consent, the elements of and defences against malpractice, legal and practical issues commonly encountered by medical assistants. 3 Credits

EMPH 623/MGT 623

Managing People and Organizations in Health care

 

This course emphasizes visionary leadership and management of diverse health care professionals in complex organizational structures. Individual leadership talents in handling various organizational challenges, such as leading organization change, building strong culture, developing effective teams, resolving conflicts, implementing effective motivational systems, and nurturing a learning organization are investigated. 3 Credits

EMPH 625/MGT 625

Organization Analysis for Health Service Improvement

 

To acquire the skills needed to analyze and interpret dynamic environments, formulate health services strategies and to develop organizational capabilities in line with the country’s requirements. Particular attention will be given to the leadership and change management skills needed to implement the previously formulated strategies and adapt new effective strategies. 3 Credits

EMPH 643

Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology of HIV/AIDS

 

Infectious disease epidemiology monitors the occurrence of infectious diseases and develops strategies for preventing and controlling disease.  It will focus on the aetiology, distribution, determinants, prevention and control of infectious diseases of major public health importance.
3 Credits

EMPH 653/ECO 653

Health Economics

 

This course will provide an overview of qualitative and quantitative decision making with a dominant focus on quantitative techniques for decision-making using clinical and economic end points and their role in clinical strategies of health care and health policy. Topics include competition in health care, cost-effectiveness or benefit analysis, cost measurement and control. 3 Credits

 

EMPH 665

 

Behavior Change Communication (BCC)

 

This course deals with the theory and principles of behaviour change communication. Communication processes in the health context. Planning, strategies and management of behaviour change communication (BCC) programs, both in Bangladesh and internationally. The focus of learning is not so much on “how to do” health promotion, as on “how to think” about the conceptual, ideological, and political issues which underlie health promotion practice. 3 Credits

EMPH 671

Reproductive Health

 

The course also covers conceptual and theoretical issues of reproductive health. At the end of the course the student will be able to identify the health needs of mothers and children of the country in general and prioritize the identified health needs for planning, organizing and managing Reproductive health programs in order to provide effective promotional, preventive and essential curative care to the women and children of the country. 3 Credits

EMPH 672

Maternal and Child Health

 

The following areas will be covered: MCH in the global perspectives, prenatal care, risk behaviour in pregnancy, breastfeeding, and maternal and infant mortality, violence, abuse and neglect of women and children. This is an interactive course in which we will consider, develop, challenge, and evaluate ideas and views across the scientific, clinical, economic, political, and ethical/legal aspects of each issue.
3 Credits

EMPH 678

Health Policy and Planning

 

This course encompasses criteria and planning principles for institutional and community personal health care services. Rationale and methods used in developing short and long range plans. The role of the individual health facility, inter-hospital affiliations, city and government health agencies, and professional organizations in the community planning process. This course examines the issues pertinent to the role of the planning and marketing functions in a health organization.
3 Credits

EMPH 681

Public Health Nutrition

 

After completion of this course learners will be able to define and discuss nutrition sciences, characteristics of different food components, dietary sources, assessment of nutritional state problems and solution with planning of advice regarding healthy good consumption habits. The course guides the students to identify risks of nutrition related problems and suggest appropriate interventions, work independently as public health nutrition specialists, describe and analyze the food and nutrition system in a community. 3 Credits

EMPH 703

Public Health Problems and Community Diagnosis

 

This course deals with the aspects of diagnosis of community health problem. The class will identify disease prevalence, prepare disease profile, identify community leaders and opinion makers in resolving community health problems. It critically reviews the community participation and involvement in Health Care System in context of different countries. 3 Credits

EMPH 704

Hospital Management

 

The course will be introduced to the students with the basic concepts of hospital management focusing on hospital manpower, logistic and resource planning and management, hospital need assessment for resources, manpower, services based on demand-supply index,  procurement, human motivation, health counselling, hospital service networking and coordination, leadership development, decision-making, service quality control, and crisis management. 3 Credits

EMPH 706

Human Resource Development and Management (HRD & HRM) for Health Services

 

The course will focus on introduction to health manpower planning, production, utilization including human resource management for health. Successful health services administrators and public service managers are knowledgeable about HR trends and implications and are equipped to engage them strategically. 3 Credits

EMPH 707/MGT 707

Principles of Organizational Leadership & Communication

 

The course will introduce to the students with the basic concepts of operational management and leadership development. Particular emphasis will be given to applied concepts, functions, principles and strategies of management focusing planning, organizing, staffing, leading, monitoring and evaluating the management performances. Special emphasis will be given to leadership and situational development, decision-making, crisis and in conflict management.
3 Credits

EMPH 715

Information Technology in Disaster Management

 

This course is aimed to provide the learners with the skills of various aspects use of information technology is disaster risk assessment and management. The course will include topics on role of IT in disaster management, needs of IT for the managers and the people, use of IT in reducing disaster loss, conceptual flow of disaster-related information.
3 Credits

EMPH 716

Public Health Geriatrics

 

Public Health Geriatric course is mainly focused on the field of gerontology studies and how people age. This introductory course gives an overview of the biology, sociology and psychology of aging and the resources available to the aged. The responsibilities of geriatric care providers are also discussed here. 3 Credits

EMPH 731

Occupational Health

 

Public health professionals will find the elements of this course comfortable while working in their day-to-day life and in practical work area after completion of it. This offers students a general introduction, public health importance and recent advances in microbiology, introduction to medical parasitology, common parasitic diseases of public health importance in Bangladesh and their interventions. 3 Credits

EMPH 732

Environmental Toxicology

 

The course introduces students with the foundations of how environmental pollutants affect biological health. A discussion of major environmental pollutants, their sources, interactions with atmospheric, terrestrial and aquatic systems, exposure of people, animals and other biota, and their dose-response relationships.  Some of the physical and chemical changes induced in the environment by pollutants, contaminant fate and transport, and bioremediation are also discussed. 3 Credits

EMPH 733

Environmental Risk Assessment and Management

 

This course will provide students with knowledge related to (1) the broad field of environmental risk assessment, (2) the risk associated with a chemical or radionuclide, (3) general steps involved in the risk assessment process, and (4) several tools that can be used in defining environmental risks, particularly as related to human health. 3 Credits

EMPH 734

Hazard and Disaster Management

 

This course is designed to provide opportunities for learning of skills that can be applied to all hazards. Initially the focus will be on "natural" hazards - hazards related to the behaviour of natural systems affecting people and facilities. The students will be able to contribute constructively to the practice and development of hazard and disaster management procedures with potential to take a leading role in due course. 3 Credits

EMPH 735

Industrial Hygiene and Hazard Management

 

Chemical, physical and other hazards and stresses found in the work environment.  Recognizing potential hazards by understanding industrial processes, toxicity of environmental contaminants and occupational disease processes. Students will gain knowledge of the OSHA and EPA regulations related to health and safety issues and will learn about personal safety equipment and techniques, administrative controls, and hazardous waste sampling. 3 Credits

EMPH 736

Disaster Risk Analysis and Management

 

Using the rubric of risk analysis the course engages its participants to consider the risk of natural, biological, chemical or other disasters. Course participants will also gain an understanding of the process of developing actionable intelligence that can be used by the public health, medical and public safety communities to reduce risk and enhance the security planning, prevention, response, mitigation and recovery process. 3 Credits

EMPH 737

Eco-Health

 

Examines emerging public health challenges posed by incidents involving chemicals, radiation and biological agents.  Students are provided with the opportunity to undertake guided research on current topics in the field and discuss their findings with graduate students and faculty members. 3 Credits

EMPH 741

Public Health Aspects of HIV/ AIDS/STDs

 

This course provides an overview of the theories and behavioural interventions used to reduce risk of HIV transmission and examine their impact in a variety of populations. Current research findings of these major theoretical models in various “at risk” populations will be critiqued. This course is designed to assist the student in planning and implementing HIV prevention programs. Course content is delivered through lectures, group discussion, and assigned readings. 3 Credits

EMPH 745

Non-Communicable Disease Control

 

This course will include topics in non-communicable diseases of public health importance including epidemiology, monitor disease activity, and methods of prevention and control. Important chronic diseases in both the industrialized and developing world will be considered e.g. cancer, heart diseases, genetic disorders, environmental diseases, etc., and compare their impact on populations, practice approaches used to monitor diseases and examine local and global efforts to control. 3 Credits

EMPH 746

Epidemiology of Accidents and Injury

 

This course will include the topics related to injury and conditions related to or resulting from injury. It will include intentional and unintentional injuries, road traffic accidents, drowning, accidental and intentional poisoning, and other forms of injuries; disabilities and losses resulting from injuries, DALY, rehabilitation methods, etc. The students will be equipped with the knowledge of control measures of various types of injuries, perform research and formulae policy 3 Credits

EMPH 771

Adolescent Health

 

This course deals with the health issues concerning growing children at puberty. These include issues regarding food, nutrition, hygiene, sexual and reproductive health, drugs and addiction issues. Problems of coping with family and society at this period of growth are also well discussed here especially with developing country settings. It focus on the information about safe reproductive health practices and they do not know how to protect themselves from unwanted pregnancy and diseases. 3 Credits

EMPH 772

Contemporary Issues in Reproductive Health Management

 

The course is designed to focus on major national and international reproductive health problems, the effect on both male and female and develops strategies to address them. Predictive values of diagnostic tests, physiology and treatment issues are also covered. The student will gain clinical knowledge and perform exercises to reinforce methodological issues presented in the class 3 Credits

 

EMPH 781

Clinical Nutrition

 

Provides students with insights into the principles and practice of clinical nutrition It is an introduction to nutrition related diseases in terms of cause and treatment, emphasizing homeostasis and regulation and includes nutritional requirements and dietary allowances, energy and protein balance, metabolic roles of vitamins and minerals, and the metabolic effects of dietary components, such as fibre. Includes nutritional requirements in infancy, adulthood and for the elderly. 3 Credits

EMPH 782

Public Health aspects of Nutritional Deficiency

 

This course will include the effects of protein energy malnutrition (PEM) on immune function, principally considering studies conducted on paediatric populations,  the effects of specific micronutrients on immune function, geriatric nutrition and the use of nutritional supplements, issues of importance for the older people of Bangladesh, role of nutritional status on human health, particularly affected by chronic diseases due to obesity (metabolic syndrome), chronic infections, aging, cancers and autoimmune diseases. 3 Credits

EMPH 802

Health Rights, Welfare and Ethics-Social Context

 

The course comprises the socio-economic aspect of Public Health in the context of Bangladesh and also other international communities. The course also includes important ethical issues in epidemiology and public health including confidentiality and privacy protection, informed consent, and the balancing of risks and benefits. 3 Credits

EMPH 805 and 806

Thesis

 

This course is basically the most vital part of the EMPH program. Students have to meet departmental standards while presenting this Thesis work.  Each of the students has to take and submit a Thesis according to the prescribed universal format of the University. Students are encouraged to spend sufficient time on their thesis project for data collection, analysis and report writing and defence. 6 Credits (3+3)
The total course is divided in two parts:
– Thesis proposal development: 3 credits and
– Final Thesis and Defence: 3 credits

EMPH 842

Clinical Epidemiology

 

This course will help students to learn or refine the skills of Epidemiology, defined as the study and management of illness in individuals as well as populations using different epidemiological methods. Students will learn the epidemiologic process, how to design and assess studies of prognosis or outcomes of illness, treatments, diagnostic tests and screening programs. 3 Credits