Dr. Muhammad Asad_Uz-Zaman

Full Time Faculty
 Assistant Professor

 Ph.D., Washington State University, USA
 MS, Washington State University, USA

Phone
: +880-2-55668200 Ext:
Email: @northsouth.edu
Office:

Curriculum Vitae

After finishing my BSc and MSc in Physics from Dhaka University in 1998 and 2000, respectively, I started my teaching career as an Advance Level Physics teacher at Bangladesh International Tutorial (BIT). Subsequently, I joined, as a faculty, Independent University, Bangladesh (IUB) in 2000, and then Dhaka University in 2001. In August 2003, I went to the USA for a PhD. During my MS and PhD periods at Washington State University, I conducted introductory physics laboratories and helped students in their tutorial hours for seven semesters.

I completed my PhD in 2011 and I came back to Bangladesh. I continued with Dhaka University as a faculty member in the Physics Department. In the beginning of 2012, I went to United Arab Emirates University as a visiting professor where I also did a post doctoral fellowship for two years, which ended in July 2014. I published six peer-reviewed articles in different reputed international journals.

I enjoy doing physics and teaching physics. I love to interact with students and teach them physics in a very simple way. My idea is to teach them from the knowledge they already have and relate physics problems to their daily life experiences (in most of the cases, this is possible).

Effect of third-order dispersion on the solitonic solutions of the Schrödinger equations with cubic nonlinearity, C. H. Samet, M. Benarous, M. Asad-uz-zaman, and U. Al Khawaja, Advances in Mathematical Physics,  Volume  2014 (2014).

Lax pairs and integrability conditions of higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger equations, M. Asad-uz-zaman, H. C. Samet, and U. Al Khawaja, submitted for publication, Applied Mathematics and Computation.

Modulational instability analysis of the Peregrine soliton, U. Al Khawaja, H. Bahlouli, M. Asad-uz-zaman, and S. M. Al-Marzoug, Communications in Nonlinear Science and Numerical Simulation 19, 2706 (2014).

Directional flow of solitons with asymmetric potential wells: Soliton diode, M. Asad-uz-zaman and U. Al Khawaja, Europhysics Letters 101, 50008 (2013).

Modification of roton instability due to the presence of a second dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate, M. Asad-uz-Zaman and D. Blume, Physical Review A 83, 033616 (2011).

Tuning the structural and dynamical properties of a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate: Ripples and instability islands, M. Asad-uz-Zaman and D. Blume, New Journal of Physics 12, 065022 (2010).

Aligned dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate in a double-well potential: From cigar-shaped to pancakeshaped, M. Asad-uz-Zaman and D. Blume, Physical Review A 80, 053622 (2009).

2003-2005: Graduate School Scholar Award, Physics and Astronomy Dept., Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA.

2000: Gold medal, International conference on Applied Mathematics and Mathematical Physics, Shahjalal

University of Science and Technology, Sylhet, Bangladesh.

1995-2000: Dhaka University Scholarship, Physics Department, Dhaka University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Conference:

Invited talk, April 26-30, 2013: Joint Meeting: Scientific days of the LPTPM and of the Physics Department,

Lax pairs and integrability conditions of higher-order nonlinear Schr ¨odinger equations, M. Asad-uz-Zaman, Chlef, Algeria.

Invited talk, January 2, 2013: Nonlinearity, difficult but full of possibilities: Soliton diode is a specific example, M. Asad-uz-zaman, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Invited talk, November 8, 2012: Directional flow of solitons with asymmetric potential wells: Soliton diode, M. Asad-uz-zaman, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.

DAMOP, June 13-17, 2011: Contributed talk, given by D. Blume, Modification of roton instability due to the presence of a second dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate, M. Asad-uz-Zaman and D. Blume, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

DAMOP, May 25-29, 2010: Poster presented, Tuning the structural and dynamical properties of a dipolar Bose–Einstein condensate: ripples and instability islands, M. Asad-uz-Zaman and D. Blume, Houston, Texas, USA.

Weakly bound systems in Atomic and Nuclear Physics, March 8-12, 2010: Workshop attended, Seattle, Washington, USA.

DAMOP, May 19-23, 2009: Poster presented, Dipolar BEC in a double-well potential, M. Asad-Uz- Zaman and D. Blume, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA.

2008-2011: PhD in Physics, Mean-field studies of dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates, Adviser: D.

Blume, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA. CGPA 3.76 out of 4.

2003-2007: MS in Physics, Investigating electron flow through a quantum point contact, Adviser: S.

Tomsovic, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA. CGPA 3.76 out of 4.

1998-2000: M.Sc. in Physics, Dhaka University, Dhaka, Bangladesh. First class fourth position.

1994-1998: B.Sc. in Physics, Dhaka University, Dhaka, Bangladesh. First class first position

July 2012-July 2014: Postdoctoral fellow, Department of Physics, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.

Doing research on a project to increase the bit rate in optical fiber communication system with Prof. Usama Al Khawaja.

Feb 2012-June 2012: Visiting Professor, Department of Physics, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.

Taught undergraduate level physics courses.

September 2011-Feb 2012: Assistant Professor (Part time), Department of Electrical Engineering and

Computer Science, North South University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Taught undergraduate level physics courses.

May 2011-Feb 2012: Lecturer, Physics Department, Dhaka University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Taught Nuclear physics and conducted laboratories for physics and numerical methods.

Fall2003-Spring 2006 and Fall 2008: Teaching Assistant, Physics and Astronomy Dept., Washington

State University, Pullman, WA, USA.

Conducted two sections of introductory physics lab (PHYS 201) and helped students in tutorial hours.

2001-2003: Lecturer, Physics Department, Dhaka University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Taught an undergraduate level physics course, led a problem class, and conducted a lab.

2000-2001: Junior Lecturer, Independent University, Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Taught an undergraduate level physics course and led a lab.

2000-2003: Part Time Physics Teacher, Bangladesh International Tutorial, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Taught an advanced level physics course and conducted a lab.

The experimental realization of Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in 1995 opens a new and unexpected play ground for physicist to explore the complicated phenomena in other branches of physics. Some of the key parameters, which determine the physics of the system, can be controlled. Therefore, the effect of these parameters can be understood in a clean and clear model system. Next few years, extensive  work, both experimentally and theoretically, has been done on systems with isotropic short-range interaction. The constituent atoms of BECs has also dipole moment, however small. Dipole-dipole interaction is long-ranged and angle dependent. Since the strength of the isotropic short-range interaction can be tuned to vanish, the effect of the dipole-dipole interaction can be observed. Theoretical studies of purely dipolar BECs shows interesting mechanical and dynamical properties compared to isotropic short-range interacting BECs. The first dipolar BEC was observed with chromium atoms in 2005. 


The research I conducted in my PhD is the mean-field study of dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates. In particular, I extensively studied the properties of dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates loaded into a double well potential by solving the Gross-Pitaevskii and Bogoliubov de Gennes equations numerically. Before joining the group, I had no experience at all with numerics. Soon, I became comfortable with Fortran language, and was able to write all the necessary codes from scratch and have a very good handle on numerics. I also studied the properties of two dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates loaded into two separate traps by numerically solving the coupled Gross-Pitaevskii and Bogoliubov de Gennes equations.

Currently I am working on the nonlinear dynamics. Specifically, I am working on the generation of rogue waves and how to manage these waves by external potentials. Rogue wave is a special type of nonlinear wave which has much larger amplitude compared to the background wave. It is localized both in space and time and has the property that it appears from nowhere and disappears without a trace. One of the simplest models for rogue wave is the Peregrine solution which has the form of a rational function. By using Darboux transformation, a technique commonly used to solve nonlinear Schr ¨odinger equations by transforming the original equation by a set of linear equations of an auxiliary field, all the higher order Peregrine solutions can be obtained. For managing or exciting the rogue wave, we study the rogue wave dynamics by preparing an initial state and evolving it with real time.

Another study we are pursuing is the soliton interaction with different potentials, i.e., impurity in optical fibers. This is one of the key factors which control the bit rate in optical fiber communication system. Soliton is a type of solution of the nonlinear Schr ¨odinger equation with the property that it can travel a long distance without change in shape. This has been used in optical communications and realized in Bose-Einstein condensates recently. The study shows that the soliton can be reflected by a potential well, which is not possible classically. Another interesting property is the existence of a critical velocity below which a soliton reflected almost perfectly and above which the soliton can transmit nearly completely accompanied by a reduction in the center of mass velocity by a certain type of potential wells. We have shown that these two effects can be used to design a soliton diode.

Full Time Faculty
 Assistant Professor

 Ph.D., Washington State University, USA
 MS, Washington State University, USA

Phone
: +880-2-55668200 Ext:
Email: @northsouth.edu
Office:

Curriculum Vitae